Yahoo Repeatedly Didn’t Invest In Security, Rejected Bare Minimum Measure To Reset All User Passwords: NYTimes

If it wasn’t already enough that the mega breach at Yahoo affects over 500 million users, a new investigative report on The New York Times states the extent to which Yahoo didn’t care about its users’ security (Editor’s note: the link could be paywalle…

If it wasn’t already enough that the mega breach at Yahoo affects over 500 million users, a new investigative report on The New York Times states the extent to which Yahoo didn’t care about its users’ security (Editor’s note: the link could be paywalled; alternate source). The report says Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer refused to fund security initiatives at the company, and instead invested money in features and new products. Despite Edward Snowden warning Yahoo that it was too easy of a target for hackers, the company took one year to hire a new chief information officer. The company hired Alex Stamos, who is widely respected in the industry. But Stamos soon left partly due to clashes with Mayer, The Times adds. And it gets worse. From the report:But when it came time to commit meaningful dollars to improve Yahoo’s security infrastructure, Ms. Mayer repeatedly clashed with Mr. Stamos, according to the current and former employees. She denied Yahoo’s security team financial resources and put off proactive security defenses, including intrusion-detection mechanisms for Yahoo’s production systems. […] But during his tenure, Ms. Mayer also rejected the most basic security measure of all: an automatic reset of all user passwords, a step security experts consider standard after a breach. Employees say the move was rejected by Ms. Mayer’s team for fear that even something as simple as a password change would drive Yahoo’s shrinking email users to other services.

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Yahoo’s Delay in Reporting Hack ‘Unacceptable’, Say Senators

Yahoo won’t be able to get away with its mega data breach from 2014 that it only reported this month. Six senior senators have said Yahoo’s two-year delay in reporting the largest known data breach in history is unacceptable. The senators have asked Ya…

Yahoo won’t be able to get away with its mega data breach from 2014 that it only reported this month. Six senior senators have said Yahoo’s two-year delay in reporting the largest known data breach in history is unacceptable. The senators have asked Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer to explain why the massive hack of more than 500 million accounts wasn’t reported two years ago when the breach occurred. From a ZDNet report:The senators said they were “disturbed” that a breach of that size wasn’t noticed at the time. “That means millions of Americans’ data may have been compromised for two years. This is unacceptable. This breach is the latest in a series of data breaches that have impacted the privacy of millions of American consumers in recent years, but it is by far the largest,” the letter wrote. Sens. Patrick Leahy, Al Franken, Elizabeth Warren, Richard Blumenthal, Roy Wyden, and Edward Markey signed the letter, dated Tuesday. The senators also requested a briefing to senate staffers on its incident response and how it intends to protect affected users.

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Moving Beyond Flash: the Yahoo HTML5 Video Player

Slashdot reader theweatherelectric writes: Over on Streaming Media, Amit Jain from Yahoo has written a behind-the-scenes look at the development of Yahoo’s HTML5 video player. He writes, “Adobe Flash, once the de-facto standard for media playback on th…

Slashdot reader theweatherelectric writes: Over on Streaming Media, Amit Jain from Yahoo has written a behind-the-scenes look at the development of Yahoo’s HTML5 video player. He writes, “Adobe Flash, once the de-facto standard for media playback on the web, has lost favor in the industry due to increasing concerns over security and performance. At the same time, requiring a plugin for video playback in browsers is losing favor among users as well. As a result, the industry is moving toward HTML5 for video playback…

At Yahoo, our video player uses HTML5 across all modern browsers for video playback. In this post we will describe our journey to providing an industry-leading playback experience using HTML5, lay out some of the challenges we faced, and discuss opportunities we see going forward.”
Yet another brick in the wall?
YouTube and Twitch have already switched to HTML5, and last year Google started automatically converting Flash ads to HTML5.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Moving Beyond Flash: the Yahoo HTML5 Video Player

Slashdot reader theweatherelectric writes: Over on Streaming Media, Amit Jain from Yahoo has written a behind-the-scenes look at the development of Yahoo’s HTML5 video player. He writes, “Adobe Flash, once the de-facto standard for media playback on th…

Slashdot reader theweatherelectric writes: Over on Streaming Media, Amit Jain from Yahoo has written a behind-the-scenes look at the development of Yahoo’s HTML5 video player. He writes, “Adobe Flash, once the de-facto standard for media playback on the web, has lost favor in the industry due to increasing concerns over security and performance. At the same time, requiring a plugin for video playback in browsers is losing favor among users as well. As a result, the industry is moving toward HTML5 for video playback…

At Yahoo, our video player uses HTML5 across all modern browsers for video playback. In this post we will describe our journey to providing an industry-leading playback experience using HTML5, lay out some of the challenges we faced, and discuss opportunities we see going forward.”
Yet another brick in the wall?
YouTube and Twitch have already switched to HTML5, and last year Google started automatically converting Flash ads to HTML5.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Yahoo Sued For Gross Negligence Over Huge Hacking

Yahoo apparently took two years to investigate and tell people that its service had been breached, and that over 500 million users were affected. Amid the announcement, a user is suing Yahoo, accusing the company of gross negligence. From a Reuters rep…

Yahoo apparently took two years to investigate and tell people that its service had been breached, and that over 500 million users were affected. Amid the announcement, a user is suing Yahoo, accusing the company of gross negligence. From a Reuters report: The lawsuit was filed in the federal court in San Jose, California, one day after Yahoo disclosed the hacking, unprecedented in size, by what it believed was a “state-sponsored actor.” Ronald Schwartz, a New York resident, sued on behalf of all Yahoo users in the United States whose personal information was compromised. The lawsuit seeks class-action status and unspecified damages. A Yahoo spokeswoman said the Sunnyvale, California-based company does not discuss pending litigation. The attack could complicate Chief Executive Marissa Mayer’s effort to shore up the website’s flagging fortunes, two months after she agreed to a $4.8 billion sale of Yahoo’s Internet business to Verizon Communications. Yahoo on Thursday said user information including names, email addresses, phone numbers, birth dates and encrypted passwords had been compromised in late 2014.

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With Yahoo Bid, Verizon Gobbles Up the Past To Avoid an Obsolete Future

A $4.8 billion Yahoo purchase turns Verizon into a future-focused media powerhouse. The post With Yahoo Bid, Verizon Gobbles Up the Past To Avoid an Obsolete Future appeared first on WIRED.

With Yahoo Bid, Verizon Gobbles Up the Past To Avoid an Obsolete Future

A $4.8 billion Yahoo purchase turns Verizon into a future-focused media powerhouse. The post With Yahoo Bid, Verizon Gobbles Up the Past To Avoid an Obsolete Future appeared first on WIRED.

Once Valued at $125B, Yahoo’s Web Assets To Be Sold To Verizon For $4.83B, Companies Confirm

The reports were spot on. Verizon Communications on Monday announced that it plans to purchase Yahoo’s Web assets for a sum of $4.83 billion in cash. The multi-billion dollars deal will get Verizon Yahoo’s core internet business and some real estate. T…

The reports were spot on. Verizon Communications on Monday announced that it plans to purchase Yahoo’s Web assets for a sum of $4.83 billion in cash. The multi-billion dollars deal will get Verizon Yahoo’s core internet business and some real estate. The announcement also marks a remarkable fall for the Silicon Valley web pioneer, which once had a market capitalization of more than $125 billion. For Verizon, the deal adds another piece to the mammoth digital media and advertising empire it owns. The deal is expected to close early 2017. CNBC reports: The transaction is seen boosting Verizon’s AOL internet business, which the company acquired last year for $4.4 billion, by giving it access to Yahoo’s advertising technology tools, as well as other assets such as search, mail, messenger and real estate. It also marks the end of Yahoo as an operating company, leaving it only as the owner of a 35.5 percent stake in Yahoo Japan, as well as its 15 percent interest in Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba. In December, Yahoo scrapped plans to spin off its Alibaba stake after investors worried about whether that transaction could have been carried out on a tax-free basis. It instead decided to explore a sale of its core assets, spurred on by activist hedge fund Starboard Value. Forbes has called it one of the “saddest $5B deals in tech history.”Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, who was expected to leave — or get fired — said she intends to stay. “For me personally, I’m planning to stay,” Mayer said in a note on Yahoo’s Tumblr page. “I love Yahoo, and I believe in all of you. It’s important to me to see Yahoo into its next chapter.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Once Valued at $125B, Yahoo’s Web Assets To Be Sold To Verizon For $4.83B, Companies Confirm

The reports were spot on. Verizon Communications on Monday announced that it plans to purchase Yahoo’s Web assets for a sum of $4.83 billion in cash. The multi-billion dollars deal will get Verizon Yahoo’s core internet business and some real estate. T…

The reports were spot on. Verizon Communications on Monday announced that it plans to purchase Yahoo’s Web assets for a sum of $4.83 billion in cash. The multi-billion dollars deal will get Verizon Yahoo’s core internet business and some real estate. The announcement also marks a remarkable fall for the Silicon Valley web pioneer, which once had a market capitalization of more than $125 billion. For Verizon, the deal adds another piece to the mammoth digital media and advertising empire it owns. The deal is expected to close early 2017. CNBC reports: The transaction is seen boosting Verizon’s AOL internet business, which the company acquired last year for $4.4 billion, by giving it access to Yahoo’s advertising technology tools, as well as other assets such as search, mail, messenger and real estate. It also marks the end of Yahoo as an operating company, leaving it only as the owner of a 35.5 percent stake in Yahoo Japan, as well as its 15 percent interest in Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba. In December, Yahoo scrapped plans to spin off its Alibaba stake after investors worried about whether that transaction could have been carried out on a tax-free basis. It instead decided to explore a sale of its core assets, spurred on by activist hedge fund Starboard Value. Forbes has called it one of the “saddest $5B deals in tech history.”Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, who was expected to leave — or get fired — said she intends to stay. “For me personally, I’m planning to stay,” Mayer said in a note on Yahoo’s Tumblr page. “I love Yahoo, and I believe in all of you. It’s important to me to see Yahoo into its next chapter.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Verizon Nears Deal to Acquire Yahoo

Verizon Communications is nearing a deal to buy Yahoo, Bloomberg reports, citing people familiar with the matter. While nothing is official yet, the publication claims that Verizon is discussing a price close to $5 billion for Yahoo’s core Internet bus…

Verizon Communications is nearing a deal to buy Yahoo, Bloomberg reports, citing people familiar with the matter. While nothing is official yet, the publication claims that Verizon is discussing a price close to $5 billion for Yahoo’s core Internet business. The report adds that Yahoo’s patents are not part of the discussion, and it’s unclear whether the two companies are considering Yahoo’s real estate. “The companies may be ready to announce the deal in the coming days, the people said,” the report adds. Interestingly, CNBC, citing its own sources, is independently reporting the same thing.

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Mozilla Could Walk Away and Still Get More Than $1 Billion If It Doesn’t Like Yahoo’s Buyer

Kara Swisher, reporting for Recode: Under terms of a contract that has been seen by Recode, whoever acquires Yahoo might have to pay Mozilla annual payments of $375 million through 2019 if it does not think the buyer is one it wants to work with and wa…

Kara Swisher, reporting for Recode: Under terms of a contract that has been seen by Recode, whoever acquires Yahoo might have to pay Mozilla annual payments of $375 million through 2019 if it does not think the buyer is one it wants to work with and walks away. That’s according to a clause in the Silicon Valley giant’s official agreement with the browser maker that CEO Marissa Mayer struck in late 2014 to become the default search engine on the well-known Firefox browser in the U.S. Mozilla switched to Yahoo from Google after Mayer offered a much more lucrative deal that included what potential buyers of Yahoo say is an unprecedented term to protect Mozilla in a change-of-control scenario. It was a scenario that Mayer never thought would happen, which is why she apparently pushed through the possibly problematic deal point. According to the change-of-control term, 9.1 in the agreement, Mozilla has the right to leave the partnership if — under its sole discretion and in a certain time period — it did not deem the new partner acceptable. And if it did that, even if it struck another search deal, Yahoo is still obligated to pay out annual revenue guarantees of $375 million.

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