Alleged Yahoo Hacker Will Be Extradited To The US

An anonymous reader quotes the AP:
A Canadian man accused in a massive hack of Yahoo emails agreed Friday to forgo his extradition hearing and go face the charges in the United States. Karim Baratov was arrested in Hamilton, Ontario, in March under the…

An anonymous reader quotes the AP:
A Canadian man accused in a massive hack of Yahoo emails agreed Friday to forgo his extradition hearing and go face the charges in the United States. Karim Baratov was arrested in Hamilton, Ontario, in March under the Extradition Act after U.S. authorities indicted him and three others, including two alleged officers of Russia’s Federal Security Service. They are accused of computer hacking, economic espionage and other crimes.

An extradition hearing for the 22-year-old Baratov had been scheduled for early September, but he signed documents before a Canadian judge Friday agreeing to waive it. His lawyer, Amedeo DiCarlo, said that does not amount to an admission of guilt… U.S. law enforcement officials call Baratov a “hacker-for-hire” paid by members of the Federal Security Service, or FSB, considered the successor to the KGB of the former Soviet Union.
Yahoo also believes that attack — which breached at least 500 million Yahoo accounts in 2014 — was perpetrated by “a state-sponsored actor.” The CBC reports that Baratov lives alone in a large, new house in an expensive subdivision. “His parents either bought him the house,” one neighbor told the CBC, “or he’s getting money somewhere else, because he doesn’t seem to work all day; he just drives up and down the street.”
The CBC also reports that Baratov’s Facebook page links to a Russian-language site “which claims to offer a number of services, including servers for rent in Russia, protection from distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, and domain names in China.”

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Tumblr’s Unclear Future Shows That There’s No Money in Internet Culture

Earlier this month as Verizon completed its acquisition, a number of Tumblr employees, as well as those at other Verizon-owned properties, like the Huffington Post, were laid off. This comes at an interesting time for Tumblr, which is increasingly stru…

Earlier this month as Verizon completed its acquisition, a number of Tumblr employees, as well as those at other Verizon-owned properties, like the Huffington Post, were laid off. This comes at an interesting time for Tumblr, which is increasingly struggling to find a business model. From an article on NYMag: The future of Tumblr is still an open question. The site is enormously popular among the coveted youth crowd — that’s partly why then-CEO Marissa Mayer paid $1 billion for the property in 2013 — but despite a user base near the size of Instagram’s, Tumblr never quite figured out how to make money at the level Facebook has led managers and shareholders to expect. For a long time, its founder and CEO David Karp was publicly against the idea of inserting ads into users’ timelines. (Other experiments in monetization, like premium options, never caught on: It’s tough to generate revenue when your most active user base is too young to have a steady income.) Even once the timeline became open to advertising, it was tough to find clients willing to brave the sometimes-porny waters of the Tumblr Dashboard. Since it joined Yahoo, the site has started displaying low-quality “chum”-style ads in between user posts on the Dashboard. Looked at from a bottom-line perspective, Tumblr is an also-ran like its parent company — a once-hot start-up that has eased into tech-industry irrelevance. […] It is rare, but not at all unprecedented, for a site to reach Tumblr’s size, prominence, and level of influence and still be unable to build a sustainable business. Twitter steers a huge portion of online culture, and has become an essential water cooler and newswire for journalists, tech workers, and otaku Nazis, but still has trouble turning a profit.

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Former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer Defends Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick

An anonymous reader writes: Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick has absorbed blistering criticism for the way he handled allegations of sexual misconduct at the San Francisco riding-hailing service. But he can at least count on the support of one big name …

An anonymous reader writes: Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick has absorbed blistering criticism for the way he handled allegations of sexual misconduct at the San Francisco riding-hailing service. But he can at least count on the support of one big name in Silicon Valley: former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer. Speaking at the annual Stanford Directors’ College Tuesday, Mayer defended Kalanick, suggesting that he was unaware of the toxic culture brewing at Uber because of the company’s rapid growth. Mayer’s name has come up in reports as a possible replacement for Kalanick at Uber, though there’s no indication the company has had talks with her. “Scale is incredibly tricky,” Mayer said. “I count Travis as one of my friends. I think he’s a phenomenal leader; Uber is ridiculously interesting. I just don’t think he knew,” she said. “When your company scales that quickly, it’s hard.” Mayer then compared Uber’s situation to the early days of Google when it first brought in Eric Schmidt as CEO to help co-founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page manage the company.

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Ask Slashdot: Advice For a Yahoo Mail Refugee

New submitter ma1wrbu5tr writes: Very shortly after the announcement of Verizon’s acquisition of Yahoo, two things happened that caught my attention. First, I was sent an email that basically said “these are our new Terms of Service and if you don’t ag…

New submitter ma1wrbu5tr writes: Very shortly after the announcement of Verizon’s acquisition of Yahoo, two things happened that caught my attention. First, I was sent an email that basically said “these are our new Terms of Service and if you don’t agree to them, you have until June 8th to close your account”. Subsequently, I noticed that when working in my mailbox via the browser, I kept seeing messages in the status bar saying “uploading…” and “upload complete”. I understand that Y! has started advertising heavily in the webmail app but I find these “uploads” disturbing. I’ve since broken out a pop client and have downloaded 15 years worth of mail and am going through to ensure there are no other online accounts tied to that address. My question to slashdotters is this: “What paid or free secure email service do you recommend as a replacement and why?” I’m on the hunt for an email service that supports encryption, has a good Privacy Policy, and doesn’t have a history of breaches or allowing snooping.

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Marissa Mayer Will Make $186 Million on Yahoo’s Sale To Verizon

Vindu Goel, reporting for the NYTimes: Yahoo shareholders will vote June 8 on whether to sell the company’s internet businesses to Verizon Communications for $4.48 billion. A yes vote, which is widely expected, would end Marissa Mayer’s largely unsucce…

Vindu Goel, reporting for the NYTimes: Yahoo shareholders will vote June 8 on whether to sell the company’s internet businesses to Verizon Communications for $4.48 billion. A yes vote, which is widely expected, would end Marissa Mayer’s largely unsuccessful five-year effort to restore the internet pioneer to greatness. But Ms. Mayer, the company’s chief executive, will be well compensated for her failure. Her Yahoo stock, stock options and restricted stock units are worth a total of $186 million, based on Monday’s stock price of $48.15, according to data filed on Monday in the documents sent to shareholders about the Verizon deal. That compensation, which will be fully vested at the time of the shareholder vote, does not include her salary and bonuses over the past five years, or the value of other stock that Ms. Mayer has already sold. All told, her time at Yahoo will have netted her well over $200 million, according to calculations based on company filings.

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Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer Could Get $23M Exit Payment, Ex-IAC Executive Will Become CEO

Yahoo has named a replacement for CEO Marissa Mayer once the merger with Verizon becomes official. The next leader of the Sunnyvale-based tech giant will be Thomas J. McInerney, a former chief financial officer of IAC. From a report: Yahoo said Monday …

Yahoo has named a replacement for CEO Marissa Mayer once the merger with Verizon becomes official. The next leader of the Sunnyvale-based tech giant will be Thomas J. McInerney, a former chief financial officer of IAC. From a report: Yahoo said Monday that after it completes the sale of its core search business to Verizon and Marissa Mayer and co-founder David Filo step down as board members of Altaba (the new name for the remaining holdings), Mayer could get a $23 million “golden parachute” payment, and Thomas McInerney will run the remaining part of the business as CEO. Mayer’s golden parachute, a large payment for top executives if they lose their position as a result of a deal, would include $19.97 million in equity and more than $3 million in cash, according to a regulatory filing. It would kick in if there is a change in control, as will be the case in the deal, and she is terminated “without cause” or “leaves for good reason” within a year.

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Marissa Mayer Is Giving Yahoo Employees Her Annual Bonus To Make Up For Massive Hacks

Following two separate security breaches revealed last year that compromised the personal information of more than 1.5 billion users, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer announced today via her Tumblr page that she will be redistributing her annual bonus and equit…

Following two separate security breaches revealed last year that compromised the personal information of more than 1.5 billion users, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer announced today via her Tumblr page that she will be redistributing her annual bonus and equity stock grant to Yahoo employees. The Verge reports: Relevant to Mayer’s admission here, an independent committee Yahoo brought on to investigate the hacks found the company to be at fault for not sufficiently responding to the security incidents. “While significant additional security measures were implemented in response to those incidents, it appears certain senior executives did not properly comprehend or investigate, and therefore failed to act sufficiently upon, the full extent of knowledge known internally by the company’s information security team,” reads the committee’s findings, which are contained in Yahoo’s 10-K report for 2016. As a result of the hacks, Yahoo’s top lawyer, Ron Bell, has been fired, Recode reported today. Mayer has accumulated about $162 million during the five years she’s spent as the company’s CEO in both salary and stock awards, according to CNN. She’s also due about $55 million in severance if she decides to leave the company following its acquisition by Verizon. So it’s safe to say her bonus would involve a hefty amount of money now going to Yahoo employees who have weathered the storm throughout Mayer’s tumultuous tenure.

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Deleting Your Yahoo Email Account? Yeah, Good Luck With That

In the wake of security breach revelations, many of you might have considered deleting your Yahoo account. Many of you might be thinking about doing so soon. Heads up, it turns out, deleting a Yahoo email account isn’t as straightforward as you may hav…

In the wake of security breach revelations, many of you might have considered deleting your Yahoo account. Many of you might be thinking about doing so soon. Heads up, it turns out, deleting a Yahoo email account isn’t as straightforward as you may have imagined, and you again have Yahoo to blame for that. From a report on ZDNet: Several Yahoo users, who last year decided to leave the service, told us that their accounts remained open for weeks or months after the company said they would be closed. David Clarke was one of those departing users, whose dormant account was slowly accumulating junk over the past few years. “This was an ancient email I had set up, had no personal data in it anymore and had a unique password,” writing about his troubles on Medium. “But it’s a part of my digital footprint that I no longer required and decided, given the horrible security practices going on at Yahoo, to vote with my account and have it removed.” Yahoo makes the account deletion process straightforward enough, but users have to wait “in most cases… approximately 90 days” for the account to close. The company says this is to “discourage users from engaging in fraudulent activity.” On day 91, Clarke logged back into his account to find that it was still active. Unbeknownst to him, logging back in simply to check would reset the clock back to zero. “Yahoo confirmed via email yesterday if you access your account it resets the timer,” he told me. “So, if you login to ensure your account has been deleted and it hasn’t, you have to wait at least another 90 days.”

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Deleting Your Yahoo Email Account? Yeah, Good Luck With That

In the wake of security breach revelations, many of you might have considered deleting your Yahoo account. Many of you might be thinking about doing so soon. Heads up, it turns out, deleting a Yahoo email account isn’t as straightforward as you may hav…

In the wake of security breach revelations, many of you might have considered deleting your Yahoo account. Many of you might be thinking about doing so soon. Heads up, it turns out, deleting a Yahoo email account isn’t as straightforward as you may have imagined, and you again have Yahoo to blame for that. From a report on ZDNet: Several Yahoo users, who last year decided to leave the service, told us that their accounts remained open for weeks or months after the company said they would be closed. David Clarke was one of those departing users, whose dormant account was slowly accumulating junk over the past few years. “This was an ancient email I had set up, had no personal data in it anymore and had a unique password,” writing about his troubles on Medium. “But it’s a part of my digital footprint that I no longer required and decided, given the horrible security practices going on at Yahoo, to vote with my account and have it removed.” Yahoo makes the account deletion process straightforward enough, but users have to wait “in most cases… approximately 90 days” for the account to close. The company says this is to “discourage users from engaging in fraudulent activity.” On day 91, Clarke logged back into his account to find that it was still active. Unbeknownst to him, logging back in simply to check would reset the clock back to zero. “Yahoo confirmed via email yesterday if you access your account it resets the timer,” he told me. “So, if you login to ensure your account has been deleted and it hasn’t, you have to wait at least another 90 days.”

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Verizon Explores Lower Price or Even Exit From Yahoo Deal

Verizon is reconsidering its $4.8 billion purchase of Yahoo, according to Bloomberg. Citing a source, the publication claims that Wednesday’s announcement by Yahoo — theft of info from one billion users — has led Verizon to consider scrapping the dea…

Verizon is reconsidering its $4.8 billion purchase of Yahoo, according to Bloomberg. Citing a source, the publication claims that Wednesday’s announcement by Yahoo — theft of info from one billion users — has led Verizon to consider scrapping the deal entirely. From the report: While a Verizon group led by AOL Chief Executive Officer Tim Armstrong is still focused on integration planning to get Yahoo up and running, another team, walled off from the rest, is reviewing the breach disclosures and the company’s options, said the person, who asked not to be identified discussing private information. A legal team led by Verizon General Counsel Craig Silliman is assessing the damage from the breaches and is working toward either killing the deal or renegotiating the Yahoo purchase at a lower price, the person said. One of the major objectives for Verizon is negotiating a separation from any future legal fallout from the breaches. Verizon is seeking to have Yahoo assume any lasting responsibility for the hack damage, the person said.

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