Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer Could Get $23M Exit Payment, Ex-IAC Executive Will Become CEO

Yahoo has named a replacement for CEO Marissa Mayer once the merger with Verizon becomes official. The next leader of the Sunnyvale-based tech giant will be Thomas J. McInerney, a former chief financial officer of IAC. From a report: Yahoo said Monday …

Yahoo has named a replacement for CEO Marissa Mayer once the merger with Verizon becomes official. The next leader of the Sunnyvale-based tech giant will be Thomas J. McInerney, a former chief financial officer of IAC. From a report: Yahoo said Monday that after it completes the sale of its core search business to Verizon and Marissa Mayer and co-founder David Filo step down as board members of Altaba (the new name for the remaining holdings), Mayer could get a $23 million “golden parachute” payment, and Thomas McInerney will run the remaining part of the business as CEO. Mayer’s golden parachute, a large payment for top executives if they lose their position as a result of a deal, would include $19.97 million in equity and more than $3 million in cash, according to a regulatory filing. It would kick in if there is a change in control, as will be the case in the deal, and she is terminated “without cause” or “leaves for good reason” within a year.

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Marissa Mayer Is Giving Yahoo Employees Her Annual Bonus To Make Up For Massive Hacks

Following two separate security breaches revealed last year that compromised the personal information of more than 1.5 billion users, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer announced today via her Tumblr page that she will be redistributing her annual bonus and equit…

Following two separate security breaches revealed last year that compromised the personal information of more than 1.5 billion users, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer announced today via her Tumblr page that she will be redistributing her annual bonus and equity stock grant to Yahoo employees. The Verge reports: Relevant to Mayer’s admission here, an independent committee Yahoo brought on to investigate the hacks found the company to be at fault for not sufficiently responding to the security incidents. “While significant additional security measures were implemented in response to those incidents, it appears certain senior executives did not properly comprehend or investigate, and therefore failed to act sufficiently upon, the full extent of knowledge known internally by the company’s information security team,” reads the committee’s findings, which are contained in Yahoo’s 10-K report for 2016. As a result of the hacks, Yahoo’s top lawyer, Ron Bell, has been fired, Recode reported today. Mayer has accumulated about $162 million during the five years she’s spent as the company’s CEO in both salary and stock awards, according to CNN. She’s also due about $55 million in severance if she decides to leave the company following its acquisition by Verizon. So it’s safe to say her bonus would involve a hefty amount of money now going to Yahoo employees who have weathered the storm throughout Mayer’s tumultuous tenure.

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Deleting Your Yahoo Email Account? Yeah, Good Luck With That

In the wake of security breach revelations, many of you might have considered deleting your Yahoo account. Many of you might be thinking about doing so soon. Heads up, it turns out, deleting a Yahoo email account isn’t as straightforward as you may hav…

In the wake of security breach revelations, many of you might have considered deleting your Yahoo account. Many of you might be thinking about doing so soon. Heads up, it turns out, deleting a Yahoo email account isn’t as straightforward as you may have imagined, and you again have Yahoo to blame for that. From a report on ZDNet: Several Yahoo users, who last year decided to leave the service, told us that their accounts remained open for weeks or months after the company said they would be closed. David Clarke was one of those departing users, whose dormant account was slowly accumulating junk over the past few years. “This was an ancient email I had set up, had no personal data in it anymore and had a unique password,” writing about his troubles on Medium. “But it’s a part of my digital footprint that I no longer required and decided, given the horrible security practices going on at Yahoo, to vote with my account and have it removed.” Yahoo makes the account deletion process straightforward enough, but users have to wait “in most cases… approximately 90 days” for the account to close. The company says this is to “discourage users from engaging in fraudulent activity.” On day 91, Clarke logged back into his account to find that it was still active. Unbeknownst to him, logging back in simply to check would reset the clock back to zero. “Yahoo confirmed via email yesterday if you access your account it resets the timer,” he told me. “So, if you login to ensure your account has been deleted and it hasn’t, you have to wait at least another 90 days.”

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Deleting Your Yahoo Email Account? Yeah, Good Luck With That

In the wake of security breach revelations, many of you might have considered deleting your Yahoo account. Many of you might be thinking about doing so soon. Heads up, it turns out, deleting a Yahoo email account isn’t as straightforward as you may hav…

In the wake of security breach revelations, many of you might have considered deleting your Yahoo account. Many of you might be thinking about doing so soon. Heads up, it turns out, deleting a Yahoo email account isn’t as straightforward as you may have imagined, and you again have Yahoo to blame for that. From a report on ZDNet: Several Yahoo users, who last year decided to leave the service, told us that their accounts remained open for weeks or months after the company said they would be closed. David Clarke was one of those departing users, whose dormant account was slowly accumulating junk over the past few years. “This was an ancient email I had set up, had no personal data in it anymore and had a unique password,” writing about his troubles on Medium. “But it’s a part of my digital footprint that I no longer required and decided, given the horrible security practices going on at Yahoo, to vote with my account and have it removed.” Yahoo makes the account deletion process straightforward enough, but users have to wait “in most cases… approximately 90 days” for the account to close. The company says this is to “discourage users from engaging in fraudulent activity.” On day 91, Clarke logged back into his account to find that it was still active. Unbeknownst to him, logging back in simply to check would reset the clock back to zero. “Yahoo confirmed via email yesterday if you access your account it resets the timer,” he told me. “So, if you login to ensure your account has been deleted and it hasn’t, you have to wait at least another 90 days.”

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Verizon Explores Lower Price or Even Exit From Yahoo Deal

Verizon is reconsidering its $4.8 billion purchase of Yahoo, according to Bloomberg. Citing a source, the publication claims that Wednesday’s announcement by Yahoo — theft of info from one billion users — has led Verizon to consider scrapping the dea…

Verizon is reconsidering its $4.8 billion purchase of Yahoo, according to Bloomberg. Citing a source, the publication claims that Wednesday’s announcement by Yahoo — theft of info from one billion users — has led Verizon to consider scrapping the deal entirely. From the report: While a Verizon group led by AOL Chief Executive Officer Tim Armstrong is still focused on integration planning to get Yahoo up and running, another team, walled off from the rest, is reviewing the breach disclosures and the company’s options, said the person, who asked not to be identified discussing private information. A legal team led by Verizon General Counsel Craig Silliman is assessing the damage from the breaches and is working toward either killing the deal or renegotiating the Yahoo purchase at a lower price, the person said. One of the major objectives for Verizon is negotiating a separation from any future legal fallout from the breaches. Verizon is seeking to have Yahoo assume any lasting responsibility for the hack damage, the person said.

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Yahoo Fixes Flaw Allowing an Attacker To Read Any User’s Emails

Yahoo says it has fixed a severe security vulnerability in its email service that allowed an attacker to read a victim’s email inbox. From a report on ZDNet: The cross-site scripting (XSS) attack only required a victim to view an email in Yahoo Mail. T…

Yahoo says it has fixed a severe security vulnerability in its email service that allowed an attacker to read a victim’s email inbox. From a report on ZDNet: The cross-site scripting (XSS) attack only required a victim to view an email in Yahoo Mail. The internet giant paid out $10,000 to security researcher Jouko Pynnonen for privately disclosing the flaw through the HackerOne bug bounty, In a write-up, Pynnonen said that the flaw was similar to last year’s Yahoo Mail bug, which similarly let an attacker compromise a user’s account. Yahoo filters HTML messages to ensure that malicious code won’t make it through into the user’s browser, but the researcher found that the filters didn’t catch all of the malicious data attributes.

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Yahoo Fixes Flaw Allowing an Attacker To Read Any User’s Emails

Yahoo says it has fixed a severe security vulnerability in its email service that allowed an attacker to read a victim’s email inbox. From a report on ZDNet: The cross-site scripting (XSS) attack only required a victim to view an email in Yahoo Mail. T…

Yahoo says it has fixed a severe security vulnerability in its email service that allowed an attacker to read a victim’s email inbox. From a report on ZDNet: The cross-site scripting (XSS) attack only required a victim to view an email in Yahoo Mail. The internet giant paid out $10,000 to security researcher Jouko Pynnonen for privately disclosing the flaw through the HackerOne bug bounty, In a write-up, Pynnonen said that the flaw was similar to last year’s Yahoo Mail bug, which similarly let an attacker compromise a user’s account. Yahoo filters HTML messages to ensure that malicious code won’t make it through into the user’s browser, but the researcher found that the filters didn’t catch all of the malicious data attributes.

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Some Within Yahoo Knew of Massive Breach in 2014

Some within Yahoo knew of a massive data breach that compromised its network when it occurred in 2014, not in late September, when it was first disclosed. From a report on USA Today: An independent committee of Yahoo’s board, which launched an internal…

Some within Yahoo knew of a massive data breach that compromised its network when it occurred in 2014, not in late September, when it was first disclosed. From a report on USA Today: An independent committee of Yahoo’s board, which launched an internal probe in August to learn more about the state-sponsored attack that affected data belonging to at least 500 million members, discovered that staff knew of the attack two years ago. “The company had identified that a state-sponsored actor had access to the company’s network in late 2014,” the company said In a filing with Securities and Exchange Commission.

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Verizon Says Yahoo Name Isn’t Going Away

Verizon is treading carefully with Yahoo, but still wants to seal the deal. From a CNET report: “The deal makes strategic sense,” said Marni Walden, the executive vice president of business innovation for Verizon and the person who pushed for the acqui…

Verizon is treading carefully with Yahoo, but still wants to seal the deal. From a CNET report: “The deal makes strategic sense,” said Marni Walden, the executive vice president of business innovation for Verizon and the person who pushed for the acquisition. “We won’t jump off of a cliff blindly.” She continues to believe there’s value in the Yahoo name, noting that it won’t go away if Verizon completes its acquisition. Brands like Yahoo Mail and Yahoo Finance still draw plenty of eyeballs, and offer the kind of audience that Verizon and AOL lack, she said during a keynote session at The Wall Street Journal Digital conference on Wednesday. Her comments come just weeks after Yahoo disclosed a 2014 breach exposed at least 500 million accounts, making it the worst hack in history. Shortly after, reports found that Yahoo had participated in a government program to sniff user emails, further eroding trust. Verizon said this all had the potential to cause a “material impact” to the deal, which could mean Yahoo takes a reduced price or the deal falls through altogether.

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Verizon Says Yahoo Name Isn’t Going Away

Verizon is treading carefully with Yahoo, but still wants to seal the deal. From a CNET report: “The deal makes strategic sense,” said Marni Walden, the executive vice president of business innovation for Verizon and the person who pushed for the acqui…

Verizon is treading carefully with Yahoo, but still wants to seal the deal. From a CNET report: “The deal makes strategic sense,” said Marni Walden, the executive vice president of business innovation for Verizon and the person who pushed for the acquisition. “We won’t jump off of a cliff blindly.” She continues to believe there’s value in the Yahoo name, noting that it won’t go away if Verizon completes its acquisition. Brands like Yahoo Mail and Yahoo Finance still draw plenty of eyeballs, and offer the kind of audience that Verizon and AOL lack, she said during a keynote session at The Wall Street Journal Digital conference on Wednesday. Her comments come just weeks after Yahoo disclosed a 2014 breach exposed at least 500 million accounts, making it the worst hack in history. Shortly after, reports found that Yahoo had participated in a government program to sniff user emails, further eroding trust. Verizon said this all had the potential to cause a “material impact” to the deal, which could mean Yahoo takes a reduced price or the deal falls through altogether.

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