Hammel pitches Royals past Red Sox

KANSAS CITY, Missouri — Jason Hammel pitched his fourth consecutive gem and Whit Merrifield drove in the go-ahead run with a seventh-inning single as the Kansas City Royals defeated the Boston Red Sox 4-2 on Monday night. The Royals (34-35) won for the eighth time in nine games, and they …

KANSAS CITY, Missouri — Jason Hammel pitched his fourth consecutive gem and Whit Merrifield drove in the go-ahead run with a seventh-inning single as the Kansas City Royals defeated the Boston Red Sox 4-2 on Monday night. The Royals (34-35) won for the eighth time in nine games, and they …

Scattered severe storms arrive in Maine, threat continues

There is the potential for heavy rain and flash flooding in the mountains and foothills Monday night.

UPDATE

As of mid-afternoon, a severe thunderstorm watch was posted for much of southern and central Maine.  Already there have been scattered severe storms.  Some of these storms could contain hail, damaging winds and even small spin-up-type tornadoes.

The threat of severe weather continues into the evening Monday. NOAA Data

As of 2:30 p.m., most of the storms are west of the coastline, but could pop up anywhere this afternoon and evening.

Storms continue to cross the region this afternoon. NOAA

You might have heard of the potential for severe weather late today and early Tuesday. While this is certainly the case, the greatest risk is over western Maine, not in Greater Portland or coastal areas. This doesn’t mean we can’t see severe weather locally, but the chances are just far greater farther west.

The highest risk of severe weather Monday is over interior southern New England. NOAA

Fog and clouds have plagued the coastline much of the weekend and continued to be an issue Monday morning. As the sun breaks through, this heats the atmosphere, making it more conducive for storms. I circled the areas already showing signs of thunderstorm development early Monday.

Showers were showing up early Monday over New York. NOAA

The air has a lot of humidity in it today and this means any rain that falls can be heavy. This is a tropical air mass and this type of air allows a lot of water to fall from the sky in a short period of time.

There is a flash-flood watch posted for the western parts of New England. Some rainfall rates could exceed 2 inches per hour today. This type of rain quickly floods roads and low-lying areas.  

Heavy rain could bring some flash flooding over western Maine. NOAA

I expect most of the rain to occur east of a line from Sanford to Augusta this evening and overnight. That said, I can’t rule out a shower this afternoon ahead of the main area. When the sun makes an appearance, temperatures will reach into the 80s again.

Storms will weaken as they approach the coastline.

After the rain, drier air will return to the region. Dew points, in the 60s to low 70s today, will fall to the lower 60s and eventually 50s by Wednesday. This will feel a lot better than the very sticky air present over us right now.

Drier air will arrive late Tuesday and Wednesday. WeatherBell

Once a front pushes east, drier air will move into New England.

The weather overall continues to be rather unsettled and changing rapidly. After a dry couple of days Wednesday and Thursday, humidity and a chance of showers arrive again Friday. If this system keeps moving, we should clear out and see a nice weekend.

Astros sail to 7-1 win over Red Sox behind Paulino

HOUSTON — David Paulino produced the best start of his young career and was backed by an aggressive offense in the Houston Astros’ 7-1 win over the Boston Red Sox on Saturday night at Minute Maid Park. Paulino (1-0) posted his first career victory by working a career-long six innings, …

HOUSTON — David Paulino produced the best start of his young career and was backed by an aggressive offense in the Houston Astros’ 7-1 win over the Boston Red Sox on Saturday night at Minute Maid Park. Paulino (1-0) posted his first career victory by working a career-long six innings, …

Four-run seventh sparks Orono past Lisbon for ‘C’ baseball crown

BANGOR, Maine — Victory appeared to be a foregone conclusion for Lisbon High School heading into the bottom of the seventh inning of Saturday’s Class C state championship baseball game. Greyhounds left-hander Tyler Halls had mastered his Orono counterparts, allowing only an infield single and two balls hit out of …

BANGOR, Maine — Victory appeared to be a foregone conclusion for Lisbon High School heading into the bottom of the seventh inning of Saturday’s Class C state championship baseball game. Greyhounds left-hander Tyler Halls had mastered his Orono counterparts, allowing only an infield single and two balls hit out of …

2017 Maine Moose Lottery Permit results

The following are the 2,080 permit winners in this year’s moose hunting drawing who were randomly selected by computer to participate in the 37th annual Maine moose hunt starting in September.

The following are the 2,080 permit winners in this year’s moose hunting drawing who were randomly selected by computer to participate in the 37th annual Maine moose hunt starting in September.

Letter to the editor: Alateen provides guidance to youths at risk of suicide

I was very saddened to read of the suicide of Anie Graham, her life taken in desperation in her first year as a teen. I thought your June 12 article was excellent and covered a lot of the important resources that both teens and their parents can turn t…

I was very saddened to read of the suicide of Anie Graham, her life taken in desperation in her first year as a teen. I thought your June 12 article was excellent and covered a lot of the important resources that both teens and their parents can turn to. I do, though, want to mention another resource that can be so important to these kids, and that is Alateen.

It is a sad fact that a lot of teenagers have parents at home who are either alcoholic and this can be one or both parents or addicts using one substance or many, which can include Vicodin, marijuana when used in an addictive way, leaving the parent fairly nonfunctional and, at the worst, heroin.

A child who lives in this environment often, if not every day, comes home to a parent who is totally nonpresent. Maine, as well as having a teen suicide rate that is consistently higher than the national average, is also way up on the list for heavy drinking and death from drug overdose.

I know of many teens who attend Alateen meetings and take advantage of the guidance provided by trained adults called sponsors who lead them through the program unconditionally. I myself was an Alateen sponsor, and I wish I’d had this guidance while I was struggling intensely with my teen years while living with two alcoholic parents.

I also want to mention that in order to help a teenager, a professional does not have to have a doctorate in psychology or be a psychiatrist. Often the first contact is with a competent social worker. I know that I got the most help when I started in counseling with social workers. They do the family tree work, they get to hear the nitty gritty of home life. This is what they are trained for.

Shelley St. Clair

Portland

Bangor Christian baseball team peaks for state championship run

BANGOR, Maine — The Bangor Christian baseball team had a lot going for it throughout the spring, but consistency wasn’t always one of those assets. Even late in the regular season the Patriots pulled off a noteworthy doubleheader sweep of then top-ranked Katahdin of Stacyville only to suffer defeat two …

BANGOR, Maine — The Bangor Christian baseball team had a lot going for it throughout the spring, but consistency wasn’t always one of those assets. Even late in the regular season the Patriots pulled off a noteworthy doubleheader sweep of then top-ranked Katahdin of Stacyville only to suffer defeat two …

Goodman edges dad to win ‘95’ RoadRunner feature

HERMON, Maine — James Goodman of Hampden won his qualifier in the RoadRunner Division at Speedway 95 on Wednesday night and then led all 20 laps of the season opener to claim his first feature win of the new season. James Goodman started on the pole next to his father, …

HERMON, Maine — James Goodman of Hampden won his qualifier in the RoadRunner Division at Speedway 95 on Wednesday night and then led all 20 laps of the season opener to claim his first feature win of the new season. James Goodman started on the pole next to his father, …

Skowhegan edges Oxford Hills for ‘A’ North softball title

AUGUSTA — Skowhegan will be making its fourth appearance in the Class A softball state championship in five years, but Indians coach Lee Johnson said he’s learned in the past half-decade that winning the regional final is never easy. It certainly wasn’t Wednesday night. The Indians’ second straight regional championship …

AUGUSTA — Skowhegan will be making its fourth appearance in the Class A softball state championship in five years, but Indians coach Lee Johnson said he’s learned in the past half-decade that winning the regional final is never easy. It certainly wasn’t Wednesday night. The Indians’ second straight regional championship …

It’s been 50 years since the ‘Summer of Love’: Photos

Throngs of American youth descended on San Francisco to join a cultural revolution that started with music, but spread to so much more.

SAN FRANCISCO — They came for the music, the mind-bending drugs, to resist the Vietnam War and 1960s American orthodoxy, or simply to escape summer boredom. And they left an enduring legacy.

This season marks the 50th anniversary of that legendary “Summer of Love,” when throngs of American youth descended on San Francisco to join a cultural revolution.

Thinking back on 1967, Bob Weir of the Grateful Dead recalls a creative explosion that sprouted from fissures in American society. That summer marked a pivot point in rock-and-roll history, he says, but it was about much more than the music.

“There was a spirit in the air,” said Weir, who dropped out of high school and then helped form the Grateful Dead in 1965. “We figured that if enough of us got together and put our hearts and minds to it, we could make anything happen.”

San Francisco, now a hub of technology and unrecognizable from its grittier, more freewheeling former self, is taking the anniversary seriously. Hoping for another invasion of visitors — this time with tourist dollars — the city is celebrating with museum exhibits, music and film festivals, Summer of Love-inspired dance parties and lecture panels. Hotels are offering discount packages that include “psychedelic cocktails,” ”Love Bus” tours, tie-dyed tote bags and bubble wands.

The city’s travel bureau, which is coordinating the effort, calls it an “exhilarating celebration of the most iconic cultural event in San Francisco history.”

One thing the anniversary makes clear is that what happened here in the 1960s could never happen in San Francisco today, simply because struggling artists can’t afford the city anymore. In the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood, which was ground zero for the counterculture, two-bedroom apartments now rent for $5,000 a month. San Francisco remains a magnet for young people, but even those earning six-figure Silicon Valley salaries complain about the cost of living.

In the mid-1960s, rent in Haight-Ashbury was extremely cheap, Weir, now 69, told The Associated Press.

“That attracted artists and bohemians in general because the bohemian community tended to move in where they could afford it,” he said.

During those years, the Grateful Dead shared a spacious Victorian on Ashbury Street. Janis Joplin lived down the street. Across from her was Joe McDonald, of the psychedelic rock band Country Joe and the Fish.

Jefferson Airplane eventually bought a house a few blocks away on Fulton Street, where they hosted legendary, wild parties.

“The music is what everyone seems to remember, but it was a lot more than that,” said David Freiberg, 75, a singer and bassist for Quicksilver Messenger Service who later joined Jefferson Airplane. “It was artists, poets, musicians, all the beautiful shops of clothes and hippie food stores. It was a whole community.”

The bands dropped by each other’s houses and played music nearby, often in free outdoor concerts at Golden Gate Park and its eastward extension known as the Panhandle. Their exciting new breed of folk, jazz and blues-inspired electrical music became known as the San Francisco Sound. Several of its most influential local acts — the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Big Brother and the Holding Company, which launched Joplin’s career — shot to fame during the summer’s three-day Monterey Pop Festival.

One song in particular served as a national invitation to hippies across the land. “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair),” written by John Phillips of the Mamas & the Papas and sung by Scott McKenzie, came out in May 1967. It bolted up the charts and was used to help promote the Monterey festival that June.

“Every fantasy about the summer of ’67 that was ever created — peace, joy, love, nonviolence, wear flowers in your hair and fantastic music — was real at Monterey. It was bliss,” said Dennis McNally, the Grateful Dead’s longtime publicist and official biographer who has curated an exhibit at the California Historical Society that runs through Sept. 10.

The exhibit, “On the Road to the Summer of Love,” explains how that epic summer came about and why San Francisco was its inevitable home. McNally uncovered 100 photographs, some never seen publicly, that trace San Francisco’s contrarian roots to the Beat poets of the 1950s, followed by civil rights demonstrations and the Free Speech Movement at the University of California, Berkeley in the early 1960s.

The national media paid little attention to San Francisco’s psychedelic community until January 1967, when poets and bands joined forces for the “Human Be-In,” a Golden Gate Park gathering that unexpectedly drew about 50,000 people, McNally said. It was there that psychologist and LSD-advocate Timothy Leary stood on stage and delivered his famous mantra: “Turn on. Tune In. Drop out.”

“After the media got hold, it just exploded,” McNally said. “Suddenly, a flood descends on Haight Street. Every bored high school kid — and that’s all of them — is saying, ‘How do I get to San Francisco?’”

An exhaustive exhibit at San Francisco’s de Young museum, “The Summer of Love Experience,” offers a feel-good trip back in time. There’s a psychedelic light show, a 1960s soundtrack and galleries with iconic concert posters, classic photographs and hippie chic fashions worn by Joplin, Jerry Garcia and others. It runs through Aug. 20.

But that summer’s invasion carried a dark cloud. Tens of thousands of youths looking for free love and drugs flooded into San Francisco, living in the streets, begging for food. Parents journeyed to the city in search of their young runaways. An epidemic of toxic psychedelics and harder drugs hit the streets.

“Every loose nut and bolt in America rattled out here to San Francisco, and it got pretty messy,” Weir said.

The longtimers saw it as the end of an era, but one that shaped history.

“We created a mindset that became intrinsic to the fabric of America today,” said Country Joe McDonald, now 75. “Every single thing we did was adapted, folded into America — gender attitudes, ecological attitudes, the invention of rock and roll.”
Half a century later, McDonald, who lives in Berkeley, feels the rumblings of history repeating itself.

UC Berkeley is again at the center of a free speech debate, albeit of a different nature. Discontent with the U.S. government and President Donald Trump has stirred the largest protests he’s seen since the Vietnam War. In the women’s marches across America, he felt echoes of the Summer of Love.

“I think there’s a similarity,” McDonald said, drawing a parallel to the massive anti-Trump turnout marked by nonviolence, playful pink protest hats, creative signs and a determination to change the country’s political course. “Both were about saying goodbye to the past and hello to the future.”