Hannaford stores see shortage of refrigerated foods after warehouse fire

A fire Wednesday night at Hannaford’s distribution center in South Portland has resulted in a temporary shortage of some refrigerated items, produce chief among them, at stores around the state.

A fire Wednesday night at Hannaford’s distribution center in South Portland has resulted in a temporary shortage of some refrigerated items, produce chief among them, at stores around the state.

A quirk in Maine’s Constitution could keep casino question off ballot

Top Maine legislators are casting about for ways to thwart a highly controversial casino bid slated for the November ballot, considering the unprecedented use of a potential loophole in the state Constitution that could allow them to strike it from the…

Top Maine legislators are casting about for ways to thwart a highly controversial casino bid slated for the November ballot, considering the unprecedented use of a potential loophole in the state Constitution that could allow them to strike it from the ballot.

Advertisers Are Still Boycotting YouTube Over Offensive Videos

An anonymous reader quotes the Associated Press:The fallout from the YouTube boycott is likely to be felt through the rest of this year. Skittish advertisers have curtailed their spending until they are convinced Google can prevent their brands from ap…

An anonymous reader quotes the Associated Press:The fallout from the YouTube boycott is likely to be felt through the rest of this year. Skittish advertisers have curtailed their spending until they are convinced Google can prevent their brands from appearing next to extremist clips promoting hate and violence… At one point, about 250 advertisers were boycotting YouTube… The list included big-spending marketers such as PepsiCo, Wal-Mart Stores, Starbucks, AT&T, Verizon, Johnson & Johnson, and Volkswagen. It’s unclear how many, if any, of those have returned to YouTube since Google promised to hire more human reviewers and upgrade its technology to keep ads away from repugnant videos. Both Verizon and AT&T, two companies that are trying to expand their own digital ad networks to compete with Google, told The Associated Press that they are still boycotting YouTube. FX Networks confirmed that it isn’t advertising on YouTube either. Several other boycotting marketers contacted by AP didn’t respond.

Thursday CEO Sundar Pichai told analysts that responding to the boycott, Google held “thousands and thousands” of conversations with advertisers, and one analyst now estimates reduced ad spending on YouTube and Google could cost the company $300 million this year alone.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Fresh season for Brunswick Farmers’ Market

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Location: Brunswick Town Mall, Maine Street, Brunswick, Maine For more information: 207-882-6374; brunswickfarmersmarket.com Starting Tuesday, May 2nd, farmers set up their tents on the Brunswick Town Mall for the Brunswick Farmers’ Market. This market runs every Tuesday and Friday from 8 …

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Location: Brunswick Town Mall, Maine Street, Brunswick, Maine For more information: 207-882-6374; brunswickfarmersmarket.com Starting Tuesday, May 2nd, farmers set up their tents on the Brunswick Town Mall for the Brunswick Farmers’ Market. This market runs every Tuesday and Friday from 8 …

The Bear Hunting Obsession of a Driven Man by Bill Wiesner

               Bill Wiesner’s book, The Bear Hunting Obsession of a Driven Man, can be simply described as everything you need to know about bear hunting. But it’s a lot more than that. From his bear hunting stories to his bear meat recipes, comprehensive descriptions of guns, bows, and other gear, …

               Bill Wiesner’s book, The Bear Hunting Obsession of a Driven Man, can be simply described as everything you need to know about bear hunting. But it’s a lot more than that. From his bear hunting stories to his bear meat recipes, comprehensive descriptions of guns, bows, and other gear, …

Range Rover Evoque defies categorization

The company calls it a ‘crossover with capability.’

The Range Rover Evoque convertible is a hybrid, but not in the traditional sense. Part truck, part sports car, straddling the line between hillbilly and city slicker, it’s half fish and half fowl.

The resulting vehicle is a two-door, four-passenger sport utility vehicle that the Range Rover company calls a “crossover with capability.”

Driven by a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine that makes 240 horsepower and 250 pound-feet of torque, the all-wheel-drive Evoque convertible comes equipped with a suite of electronics to ensure that capability.

The Terrain Response System enables the Evoque to master mud, sand, snow and other surfaces. The Hill Descent Control keeps the Evoque from running downhill, while the Hill Start Assist keeps it from slipping from a dead stop while pointing uphill.

More electronic aids – including traction control, roll stability control and dynamic stability control – keep the Evoque secure on flatter ground.

This feathered fish is a bit anonymous around town when the top is up. But it’s entirely anomalous when the top is down.

“That car is sick!” one fellow commuter called out to me. “It’s a total babe magnet!” said another.

Not everyone appreciates the anomaly. One friend grimaced when I pulled to the curb, noting the car’s high belt line and short wheelbase, and said, “It looks like a hot tub with a windshield.”

Like everything in the Range Rover family, the Evoque (base price $58,270) is a pleasure to drive. Competent and easy to park in town, it feels lush on the freeway, solid and planted.

The engine chugs through a nine-speed automatic transmission, which may help with fuel economy but felt like three or four too many gears for smooth driving. (That transmission is also in the Jeep Cherokee cars, which produce a similar sensation.)

I experienced a little turbo lag when I went pedal to metal, before that torque kicked in and pushed the Evoque forward.

The suspension works to do all things well, but doesn’t. A little stiff around town in Normal mode, it begins to feel sporty in Sport but remains a little too soft to inspire confidence off-road, where the relatively limited ground clearance and thin tires prohibit it from getting too rowdy in the rough stuff.

Built on the same platform as Range Rover’s Discovery Sport SUV, the Evoque shares its engine and many other characteristics with that Sport and also with the sibling Jaguar XE sport sedan.

The Oxford leather front seats are cozy and comfortable. On the model I borrowed, they were heated too, but not ventilated. The similarly upholstered rear seats, while not spacious, are also comfortable and allow ample head room with the top up or down.

Unlike many convertibles, the trunk offers enough cargo space – 8.8 cubic feet – to carry a golf bag around town, with the top up or down.

And that top? It features the second quietest, smoothest convertible motor I’ve ever encountered, after the Rolls Royce Dawn. It is so silent I had to keep looking to make sure it was actually doing its job.

It’s not clear who this car is for. The Jaguar Land Rover folks told me Evoque buyers are cross-shopping Jeep Wranglers, Audi A5 Cabrios and BMW 4 series convertibles.

Are there many of them? Yes, and no.

An executive with the company said the Evoque got to 100,000 units globally faster than any car in Range Rover’s history. Like the Discovery family of cars, it has been especially popular in the U.S.

But of the three models offered – the convertible, and two-door and four-door hardtop versions – the convertible accounts for only 7 percent of total sales, Range Rover said. Even though the Evoque convertible is the only soft-top Range Rover or Land Rover available, almost everyone is buying the four-door.

That makes more sense, but it’s likely to be less fun, and turn fewer heads.

432 York St., York Harbor, York

The home will be sold by Keenan Auction Company on site at 11 a.m. Friday, May 19. Preview: 10 a.m.-noon Thursday, May 4.

YORK – The location, in one of southern Maine’s most desirable coastal towns, is ideal, whether you are seeking a spacious, single-family home, or are considering an investment or business opportunity such as a bed-and-breakfast. Here is your opportunity.

This elegant, c. 1910 Colonial sits in the Business 1 zone in the heart of historic York Harbor, only a four-minute walk to the beach, Hartley Mason Park and other attractions including shops and restaurants. On its three levels of living there are 18 rooms, including nine bedrooms, and seven baths, five of them en suite – a great benefit to an inn owner.

One who is also in residence will appreciate updates such as the newer Burnham heating system, the nicely landscaped side gardens on the 0.53-acre lot, and the freshly painted top floor; conveniences including central vac and plenty of paved parking in addition to the two-vehicle, direct-entry garage; and the many well-preserved period details, e.g. hardwood or wide-pine flooring, found throughout the 3,884-square-foot property.

Behind the broad porch, at the front of the home, are a living room and a great room, each with lovely built-ins, each with a handsome, brick wood-burning fireplace. The center hall connects to a formal dining room (note its ceiling medallion), a full bath, an office/study, and a large, tiled kitchen, with a gas range, bay for dining, and deep, L-shaped pantry lined with shelving.

Near the laundry/mudroom, back “breakfast” stairs access the second-floor’s butler’s pantry and maid’s quarters, and a two-room third-level suite with a private deck. The gorgeous front staircase ascends from the great room to both main-house upper levels, each of which has four bedrooms.     

The home at 432 York St., York, will be sold at an on-site auction at 11 a.m. on Friday, May 4. A preview will be held from 10 a.m.-noon on Thursday, May 4.

For more information or to arrange a viewing, please contact Keenan Auction Company at 885-5100 or at info@keenanauction.com; and see Auction 17-79 at www.keenanauction.com.

The Home of the Week is produced by the Marketing Department of the Maine Sunday Telegram. Photos by Diane Maines. Please send feature home suggestions to jrolfe@pressherald.com.

Visualizing Maine’s serial drunken-driving offenders

7,267 distinct individuals have been convicted five or more times for drunken driving in Maine since 1980. That’s roughly as many people as the entire population of Rockland.

Since 1980, 7,267 motorists have been convicted five or more times for drunken driving in Maine.

That’s roughly as many people as the entire population of Rockland.

In the charts below, each emoji represents one driver who’s been convicted multiple times of drunken driving, and each emoji represents one conviction.

169 people

have been convicted ten or more times for drunken driving:

An additional

180 motorists

have been convicted nine times for drunken driving:

405 more motorists

have been convicted eight times for drunken driving:

Another 865 motorists

have been convicted seven times for drunken driving:

1,827 motorists

have been convicted six times for drunken driving:

3,821 motorists

have been convicted five times for drunken driving:

8,938 motorists

have been convicted exactly four times for drunken driving since 1980.

That’s roughly as many people as the entire population of Presque Isle.

16,410 motorists

have been convicted exactly three times for drunken driving since 1980.

That’s roughly as many people as the entire population of Waterville.

And

48,974 motorists

have been convicted exactly twice for drunken driving since 1980.

That’s more than the entire population of Auburn and Biddeford combined.

Week in review: Tyson buying Barber parent; restaurants end no-tip policy

Also: Lawmakers approve new mining rules.

MANUFACTURING

Tyson plans to buy former Barber Food plant

Food giant Tyson Foods intends to buy AdvancePierre, a company that includes the former Barber Foods of Portland, for $4.2 billion. The sale’s likely impact on the Portland operation is unknown. Tyson said it intends to push AdvancePierre brands such as Barber Foods into new markets, but it also plans to cut costs and make the operation more efficient. The deal, announced Tuesday morning, has been approved by the boards of both Tyson and AdvancePierre. If it receives regulatory approval, the sale is expected to close in the third quarter of this year. Cincinnati-based AdvancePierre employs about 300 people at its St. John Street plant where frozen, stuffed chicken entrees are made and sold under the Barber Foods name. AdvancePierre bought Barber Foods in June 2011 and invested millions in modernizing the production facility, helping the frozen entree division become one of the most profitable for the company. AdvancePierre also makes sandwiches and other prepared foods for convenience stores and other retailers, as well as institutions such as schools and hospitals. Read the story.

MINING

Lawmakers approve new mining rules

A legislative committee gave near-unanimous support Wednesday to a proposed overhaul of Maine’s mining regulations that has also won the backing of many of the state’s environmental organizations. The proposal would ban open-pit mining as well as operations on state-owned public lands, in flood plains and under lakes, rivers or ponds. It also would prohibit underwater storage of mine waste and would require mining companies to create a trust fund large enough to cover the costs of cleaning up or treating any environmental contamination on a site for at least 100 years after closure of the mine. The bill, L.D. 820, has been the subject of months of work by lawmakers, environmental advocates and representatives of the Maine Department of Environmental Protection. If passed by the full Legislature and signed by Gov. Paul LePage – which is never a guarantee – the bill would end a years-long stalemate over mining regulations that began when a Canadian company sought to loosen Maine’s overly restrictive rules to mine valuable minerals below Aroostook County’s Bald Mountain. The Legislature’s Environment and Natural Resources Committee voted 11-1 – with one lawmaker absent – in support of the bill. The measure now heads to the House and Senate floors, where supporters would need to muster two-thirds support in both chambers to overcome a potential LePage veto. Read the story.

RETAIL

Restaurants drop no-tipping policy

Chef Cara Stadler’s experiment with a “no tipping” policy has ended nearly five months after it began at her restaurants in Portland and Brunswick. Bao Bao Dumpling House in Portland and Tao Yuan in Brunswick reversed the policy Wednesday after a review of the books for the first quarter of the year revealed it had been a failure. Chris Peterman, director of operations for the restaurants, said customers balked at the higher prices the restaurants had to charge to make up for the higher wages paid to servers who lost tip income. Peterman would not divulge specifics about the restaurants’ bottom line or how large their losses were, but he said customers were ordering less at meals and generally not spending as much money. Revenue, he said, “was not where we wanted it to be, and it wasn’t trending in the direction we were hoping for.” Stadler announced the no-tipping policy in October, just before Maine voters approved an increase in the state’s minimum wage, which went into effect Dec. 1. Read the story.

REAL ESTATE & CONSTRUCTION

Elk’s deal closes; redevelopment planned

The Portland Elks Lodge on Congress Street is expected to be redeveloped into a mixed-use complex, which includes a smaller but wholly renovated lodge. Malone Commercial Brokers said Wednesday that the Elks organization has sold a portion of its property at 1945 Congress St. to Diversified Partners LLC and Fancy Sauce LLC for $1.25 million. The entire property contains a 23,090-square-foot lodge building and 7 acres. After the renovation, the Elks Lodge 188 will have an updated, 13,500-square-foot lodge. Northland Enterprises will develop the other property into offices for Clark Insurance and a medical office building, according to the release. Read the story.

Developer buys lobster wharf in Harpswell

The new owner of a working lobster wharf next to the landmark Cook’s Lobster & Ale House on Bailey Island in Harpswell says he has no immediate plans to redevelop the property. Arthur Girard bought the quarter-acre property at 66 Garrison Cove Road at auction Tuesday for $510,000, outbidding the owners of the adjacent restaurant. The pier was built around 1950 and includes a bait shed and small office that is leased by Eastern Traders, a lobster dealer that serves about two dozen local fishermen. Buying the property was a spur-of-the-moment decision, said Girard, and he expects eventually to sell it to the owners of Cook’s Lobster. Read the story.

BANKING & FINANCE

Strong first quarters reported at Camden and Northeast

Camden National Bank, the largest bank chartered in Maine, reported a 17 percent increase in net income in the first quarter compared with a year earlier. The Camden-based bank reported net income for the quarter of $10.1 million, up from $8.7 million in the first quarter of 2016 but down 8 percent from $10.9 million in the fourth quarter of 2016.

Earnings per share for the publicly traded bank was 64 cents, up 14 percent from a year earlier but down 9 percent from the previous quarter. Another Maine-based bank, Northeast Bancorp of Lewiston, also reported quarterly financial results this week. Its net income for the quarter ending March 31 – the third quarter of Northeast’s 2017 fiscal year – nearly doubled from a year earlier. Northeast reported net income of $3.5 million for the quarter, up 94 percent from $1.8 million a year earlier. It reported earnings per share of 39 cents, up 105 percent from 19 cents in the third quarter of its 2016 fiscal year. Read the story.

TRADE

Lumber tariffs welcomed by local sawmills

Maine sawmill owners are welcoming the Trump administration’s announcement that it is imposing stiff duties on imports of Canadian softwood lumber, intensifying a longstanding trade dispute with the United States’ largest trading partner. President Trump revealed the decision to a gathering of conservative journalists Monday night, pre-empting the Commerce Department, which had planned to make the announcement Tuesday. Starting next week, the department will impose duties of 3 percent to 24 percent on softwood 2-by-4s, planks and other lumber arriving from Canada. The punitive duties are retaliation for Canadian provincial governments allegedly providing unfair subsidies to their industry. The action might raise the price of house framing lumber made from spruce, fir, pine and other softwood trees, but Maine’s sawmill owners say the action levels the playing field. Read the story.

Report: Strong exports buoy Maine economy

Maine’s export growth outperforms the nation’s, a positive sign for the state’s economy, which otherwise lags behind the U.S. and the rest of New England. Exports were one of the few bright spots highlighted in Measures of Growth 2017, the annual report released Tuesday by the Maine Development Foundation and Maine Economic Growth Council. The report assigns grades to 26 economic indicators that range from unemployment rates to fourth-grade reading scores and the quality of Maine’s air and water. Each indicator has a benchmark and an analysis of the state’s performance. International sales from Maine grew by 5 percent from 2015 to 2016, while U.S. exports declined by 3.3 percent over the same period. Maine’s export growth was rated second-best in New England and eighth nationally, according to the report. Read the story.

TOURISM

Portland visitors’ bureau rebrands itself

The Greater Portland Convention and Visitors Bureau is changing its name after 35 years. As of Thursday, the tourism marketing organization for Maine’s biggest city and surrounding area will be known simply as “Visit Portland.” Rebranding is a way to clarify the organization’s role for visitors, businesses and residents, said Lynn Tillotson, president and CEO. More than 200 convention and visitors’ bureaus across the country have ditched their cumbersome names for shorter labels in recent years, she added. Read the story.

 

Cat ferry schedule extended by two weeks

The Portland City Council unanimously approved a contract Monday to extend the season for the Portland-to-Yarmouth Nova Scotia ferry service by two weeks. The new lease would also allow the Bay Ferries to lease the ground-floor space in the Ocean Gateway terminal building for an additional $1,400 a month. All told, the amended agreement is expected to generate an additional $16,600 in revenue for the city, which last year received $265,000 in rent, parking and fees. Under the new agreement, Bay Ferries will operate The Cat high-speed ferry service from May 31 to Oct. 15. Last year, The Cat ferried 35,551 passengers during the 2016 season, which ran from June 1 to Sept. 31, though the first voyage did not occur until June 15. Read the story.