Storing Very Large Files On Amazon’s Unlimited Cloud Photo Storage

AmiMoJo writes: Last year Amazon started offering unlimited cloud storage for photos to customers who subscribed to its “Prime” service. Japanese user YDKK has developed a tool to store arbitrary data inside a .bmp file, which can then be uploaded to Amazon’s service. A 1.44GB test image containing an executable file uploaded at over 250Mb/sec, far faster than typical cloud storage services that are rate limited and don’t allow extremely large files.

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Barracuda Copy Shutting Down

New submitter assaf07 writes: I received a notification [Monday] that Barracuda’s excellent online storage option Copy will be shuttting down in May. A blog post by Rod Matthews, VP of Storage at Barracuda gives the usual business doublespeak excuse. Having used Google’s Drive, Box, Dropbox, and Spideroak, I am very disappointed to lose Copy as its native Linux, Android, IOS, and Windows clients are/were wonderful.

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Triple M.2 NVMe RAID-0 Testing Proves Latency Reductions

Vigile writes: The gang over at PC Perspective just posted a story that looks at a set of three M.2 form factor Samsung 950 Pro NVMe PCIe SSDs in a RAID-0 array, courtesy of a new motherboard from Gigabyte that included three M.2 slots. The pure bandwidth available in this configuration is amazing, breaching 3.3 GB/s on reads and 3.0 GB/s on writes. But what is more interesting is a new testing methodology that allows for individual storage IO latency capturing, giving us a look at performance of SSDs in all configurations. What PC Perspective proved here is that users often claiming that RAIDs “feel faster” despite a lack of bandwidth result to prove it, are likely correct. Measurements now show that the latency of IO operations improves dramatically as you add drives to an array, giving a feeling of “snappiness” to a system beyond even what a single SSD can offer. PC Perspective’s new testing demonstrates the triple RAID-0 array having just 1/6th of the latency of a single drive.

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Silicon:Safe Bags $1M Seed For Its Hardware Fix For Bulk Password Theft

SiliconSAFE hardware #1 Sony Pictures. Ashley Madison. Twitch. Patreon. Dropbox. Snapchat. LinkedIn. Last.fm… Those are just a handful of the companies that have suffered massive password-related breaches in recent years. Bulk password theft is the scourge of our digital times. Read More

Six Missing HDDs Contain Health Information of Nearly a Million Patients

Lucas123 writes: Health insurer Centene Corp. revealed that it is looking for six HDDs with information on 950,000 customers that went missing during a data project that was using laboratory results to improve the health outcomes of patients. The drives not only contain sensitive personal identification information, such as addresses, dates of birth and social security numbers, but they also contain health information. “While we don’t believe this information has been used inappropriately,” said Michael Neidorff, CEO of Centene.

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Service Provider Builds National Network of Unmanned Data Centers

1sockchuck writes: Colocation and content delivery specialist EdgeConneX is operating unmanned “lights out” data centers in 20 markets across the United States, marking the most ambitious use to date of automation to streamline data center operations. While some companies have operated prototypes of “lights out” unmanned facilities (including AOL) or deployed unmanned containers with server gear, EdgeConneX built its broader deployment strategy around a lean operations model. The company uses software to remotely control the generators and UPS systems at each data center, and can dispatch techs when on-site maintenance is needed.

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OCZ RevoDrive 400 NVMe SSD Unveiled With Nearly 2.7GB/Sec Tested Throughput

MojoKid writes: Solid State Drive technology continues to make strides in performance, reliability and cost. At the CES 2016 show there were a number of storage manufacturers on hand showing off their latest grear, though not many made quite the splash that Toshiba’s OCZ Technology group made with the annoucement of their new RevoDrive 400 NVMe PCI Express SSD. OCZ is tapping on Toshiba’s NVMe controller technology to deliver serious bandwidth in this consumer-targeted M.2 gumstick style drive that also comes with a X4 PCI Express card adapater. The drive boasts specs conservatively at 2.4GB/sec for reads and 1.6GB/sec for writes in peak sequential transfer bandwidth. IOPs are rated at 210K and 140K for writes respectively. In the demo ATTO test they were running, the RevoDrive 400 actually peaks at 2.69GB/sec for reads and also hits every bit of that 1.6GB/sec write spec for large sequential transfers.

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Gene Roddenberry’s Floppy Disks Recovered

Press2ToContinue writes: When Gene Roddenberry’s computer died, it took with it the only method of accessing some 200 floppy disks of his unpublished work. To make matters worse, about 30 of the disks were damaged, with deep gouges in the magnetic surface. “Cobb said a few of the disks were formatted in DOS, but most of them were from an older operating system called CP/M. CP/M, or Control Program for Microcomputers, was a popular operating system of the 1970s and early 1980s that ultimately lost out to Microsoft’s DOS. In the 1970s and 1980s it was the wild west of disk formats and track layouts, Cobb said. The DOS recoveries were easy once a drive was located, but the CP/M disks were far more work. ” So what was actually on the disks? Lost episodes of Star Trek? The secret script for a new show? Or as Popular Science once speculated, a patent for a transporter? Unfortunately, we still don’t know. The Roddenberry estate hasn’t commented yet, and the data recovery agency is bound by a confidentiality agreement.

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Samsung’s tiny T3 SSD is still smaller than a business card, now holds 2TB

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LAS VEGAS — Samsung’s Portable T1 SSD blew us away last year with its minuscule size, incredibly fast performance and storage capacity of up to 1TB.

Samsung’s new Portable T3 SSD, announced at CES, is still smaller than a standard business card (2.91 x 2.28 x 0.41 inches), but it’s now enclosed in a more durable metal case that can withstand 1500G of force and a drop from up to six feet. It also comes in capacities from 250GB all the way up to 2TB.

At 1.8 ounces, the T3 SSD weighs twice as much as the T1 SSD, but you won’t feel it in your pocket. It’s still way lighter than a portable hard drive — and plus, there are no moving parts Read more…

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Tech Segments Facing Turbulence In 2016

Nerval’s Lobster writes: David Foote, an analyst who accurately predicted the tech industry’s job growth in 2015, is back with some new predictions about which segments will do well in 2016 (Dice link). At the top of his list: DevOps, cloud and software architects, and cybersecurity experts. Those that won’t perform well? SAP specialists, storage ‘gurus,’ and network managers could all face some headwinds. ‘Companies are continuing to outsource infrastructure and that will reduce the need for network specialists except for network security which will remain in-house,’ he says. Whether or not he’s right about which parts of the tech industry will do better than others, there are also increasing signs that things could get very tight from a funding perspective for startups, as even the so-called ‘unicorns’ risk seeing investor money (and customers) dry up.

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