Researchers Develop Atomic-Scale Hard Drive That Writes Information Atom By Atom

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Researchers in the Netherlands have created a microscopic storage system that encodes every bit with a single atom — allowing them to fit a kilobyte in a space under 100 nanometers across. That tran…

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Researchers in the Netherlands have created a microscopic storage system that encodes every bit with a single atom — allowing them to fit a kilobyte in a space under 100 nanometers across. That translates to a storage density of about 500 terabits per square inch. For comparison, those 4-terabyte hard drives you can buy today are about 1 terabit per square inch. That’s because, unlike this new system, they use hundreds or thousands of atoms to store a single bit. “Every bit consists of two positions on a surface of copper atoms, and one chlorine atom that we can slide back and forth between these two positions,” explained Sander Otte, lead scientist at Delft University of Technology, in a news release. Because chlorine on copper forms into a perfectly square grid, it’s easy (relatively, anyway) to position and read them. If the chlorine atom is up top, that’s a 1; if it’s at the bottom, that’s a 0. Put 8 chlorine atoms in a row and they form a byte. The data the researchers chose to demonstrate this was a fragment of a Feynman lecture, “There’s plenty of room at the bottom” (PDF) — fittingly, about storing data at extremely small scales. (You can see a high-resolution image of the array here.) The chlorine-copper array is only stable in a clean vacuum and at 77 kelvin — about the temperature of liquid nitrogen. Anything past that and heat will disrupt the organization of the atoms. The research was published today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

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Encrypted DNA Storage Investigated by DOE Researchers

Biological engineers at a Department of Energy lab “are experimenting with encrypted DNA storage for archival applications.” Slashdot reader ancientribe shares an article from Dark Reading:
Using this method, the researchers could theoretically store 2…

Biological engineers at a Department of Energy lab “are experimenting with encrypted DNA storage for archival applications.” Slashdot reader ancientribe shares an article from Dark Reading:
Using this method, the researchers could theoretically store 2.2 petabytes of information in one gram of DNA. That’s 200 times the printed material at the Library of Congress… Instead of needing a 15,000 square-foot building to store 35,000 boxes of inactive records and archival documents, Sandia National Laboratories can potentially store information on much less paper, in powder form, in test tubes or petri dishes, or even as a bacterial cell… “Hard drives fail and very often the data can’t be recovered,” explains Bachand. “With DNA, it’s possible to recover strands that are 10,000 to 20,000 years old… even if someone sneezes and the powder is lost, it’s possible to recover all the information by just recovering one DNA molecule.”

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Encrypted DNA Storage Investigated by DOE Researchers

Biological engineers at a Department of Energy lab “are experimenting with encrypted DNA storage for archival applications.” Slashdot reader ancientribe shares an article from Dark Reading:
Using this method, the researchers could theoretically store 2…

Biological engineers at a Department of Energy lab “are experimenting with encrypted DNA storage for archival applications.” Slashdot reader ancientribe shares an article from Dark Reading:
Using this method, the researchers could theoretically store 2.2 petabytes of information in one gram of DNA. That’s 200 times the printed material at the Library of Congress… Instead of needing a 15,000 square-foot building to store 35,000 boxes of inactive records and archival documents, Sandia National Laboratories can potentially store information on much less paper, in powder form, in test tubes or petri dishes, or even as a bacterial cell… “Hard drives fail and very often the data can’t be recovered,” explains Bachand. “With DNA, it’s possible to recover strands that are 10,000 to 20,000 years old… even if someone sneezes and the powder is lost, it’s possible to recover all the information by just recovering one DNA molecule.”

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UW, Microsoft Successfully Encoded 200MB of Data Onto Synthetic DNA Molecules

An anonymous reader writes from a report via The Seattle Times: Researchers from Microsoft and the University of Washington said Thursday that they had successfully encoded about 200 megabytes of data onto synthetic DNA molecules. The information inclu…

An anonymous reader writes from a report via The Seattle Times: Researchers from Microsoft and the University of Washington said Thursday that they had successfully encoded about 200 megabytes of data onto synthetic DNA molecules. The information included more than 100 books, translations of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and a high-definition music video from the band OK Go. Previously, the record was 22 megabytes encoded and decoded on DNA, said the researchers. Microsoft’s lead researcher on the project, Karin Strauss, said DNA storage of the type demonstrated in the UW lab could, theoretically, store an exabyte (one billion gigabytes) of data in about one cubic inch of DNA material. “Our goal is really to build systems to show that it is possible,” she said. DNA is also very durable. If stored in the right conditions, data encoded on DNA could be readable for thousands of years, compared to typical hard disks or flash drives that can fail in a few years.

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UW, Microsoft Successfully Encoded 200MB of Data Onto Synthetic DNA Molecules

An anonymous reader writes from a report via The Seattle Times: Researchers from Microsoft and the University of Washington said Thursday that they had successfully encoded about 200 megabytes of data onto synthetic DNA molecules. The information inclu…

An anonymous reader writes from a report via The Seattle Times: Researchers from Microsoft and the University of Washington said Thursday that they had successfully encoded about 200 megabytes of data onto synthetic DNA molecules. The information included more than 100 books, translations of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and a high-definition music video from the band OK Go. Previously, the record was 22 megabytes encoded and decoded on DNA, said the researchers. Microsoft’s lead researcher on the project, Karin Strauss, said DNA storage of the type demonstrated in the UW lab could, theoretically, store an exabyte (one billion gigabytes) of data in about one cubic inch of DNA material. “Our goal is really to build systems to show that it is possible,” she said. DNA is also very durable. If stored in the right conditions, data encoded on DNA could be readable for thousands of years, compared to typical hard disks or flash drives that can fail in a few years.

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Samsung Unveils World’s First UFS Storage Cards, Could Replace MicroSD

An anonymous reader writes: Samsung has unveiled the world’s first UFS card that could one day replace microSD cards in devices. The UFS card is based on the Universal Flash Storage 1.0 Card Extension standard and will be available in capacities from 3…

An anonymous reader writes: Samsung has unveiled the world’s first UFS card that could one day replace microSD cards in devices. The UFS card is based on the Universal Flash Storage 1.0 Card Extension standard and will be available in capacities from 32GB to 256GB. With a UFS card, users will be able to read 5GB of data, or a full resolution movie file, in 10 seconds, Samsung claims. For comparison, a UHS-1 microSD card would take 50 seconds to do the same. UFS cards will be able to fit into a wide range of devices like smartphones, tablets, cameras, and drones, but the devices will need a specific UFS card slot, which could take some time. Samsung claims the 256GB UFS card has a sequential read speed of 530MBps. The random read speed is 20 times faster than a microSD card. The sequential write speed is about 170MBps, which Samsung estimates is two times faster than microSD cards. The random write speed is 350 times faster than microSD, Samsung claims. The Universal Flash Storage 1.0 Card Extension standard is intended to replace the eMMC standard, which is used in low-cost laptops and Chromebooks. Samsung didn’t disclose pricing or availability for the UFS storage cards. It’s worth noting that Toshiba does also make UFS storage cards, but they have yet to release any based on the UFS 1.0 Card Extension standard.

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Study: 78% of Resold Drives Still Contain Readable Personal or Business Data

itwbennett writes: Blancco Technology Group, which specializes in data erasure, bought 200 secondhand PC storage drives (PDF) from eBay and Craigslist to see if they could recover any of the old data saved inside. Their findings: 78 percent of the driv…

itwbennett writes: Blancco Technology Group, which specializes in data erasure, bought 200 secondhand PC storage drives (PDF) from eBay and Craigslist to see if they could recover any of the old data saved inside. Their findings: 78 percent of the drives contained residual data that could be recovered, 67 percent still held personal files, such as photos with location indicators, resumes and financial data, and 11 percent of the drives also contained company data, such as emails, spreadsheets and customer information. Only 10 percent had all the data securely wiped, Blancco said. The Consumerist points out that Blancco makes their money from promising secure data erasure, so the company has a “strong and vested interest in these results.” As for why so many of the drives contain unwanted information, the report says it has to do with the difference between “deleting” data and “erasing” data. Your files aren’t actually deleted when you drag them to the Trash or Recycle Bin, or by using the delete key — shocking, I know. You can format a drive to erase the data, but you have to be careful of the format commands being used. A quick format, which was used on 40% of the drives in the sample, still leaves some residual data on the drive for someone to possibly access. A full format, which was used on 14% of the drives, will do a better job in removing unwanted files, but it too may still miss some crucial information. The solution Blancco recommends: buy a tool to perform complete data erasure.

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SanDisk Made an iPhone Case With Built-In Storage

An anonymous reader writes: SanDisk has made its iXpand Memory Case to alleviate the problem that Apple creates when they release an iPhone in 2016 with only 16GB of on-board storage. The iXpand Memory Case is an iPhone case with flash storage built di…

An anonymous reader writes: SanDisk has made its iXpand Memory Case to alleviate the problem that Apple creates when they release an iPhone in 2016 with only 16GB of on-board storage. The iXpand Memory Case is an iPhone case with flash storage built directly into the case itself that connects/charges via the Lightning port. You won’t need a new phone and you won’t need to carry around an extra charging dongle, which is the case for many other third-party cases and accessories. Since Apple doesn’t make expanding your storage with third-party devices easy, you will need to download/install the companion SanDisk iXpand Memory Case app on your iPhone, which will automatically back-up your camera roll and password-protect your photos and files. If you need some extra juice, you can spend an extra $40 to receive a 1900mAh battery pack that attaches to the case. The iXpand Memory Case is only available with the iPhone 6 and 6s and is available with 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB of extra flash storage for $59, $99, and $129, respectively. Oh, and of course there are varying color options: Red, Grey, Sky and Mint. Maybe your phone battery is running low (God-forbid it is dead) and you just so happen to be nearby a KFC in Delhi or Mumbai, KFC has you covered. They have introduced a meal box that doubles as a smartphone charger.

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PayPal Dumped Cloud Company After It Refused To Monitor Customers’ Files

German Dropbox rival Seafile claims PayPal dropped it as a customer after it refused to comply with the payment services company’s demand to spy on its users’ data. In a blog post, the company informed its customers that they can no longer pay for the …

German Dropbox rival Seafile claims PayPal dropped it as a customer after it refused to comply with the payment services company’s demand to spy on its users’ data. In a blog post, the company informed its customers that they can no longer pay for the service using PayPal — the only payment method that Seafile currently relies on. CEO Silja Jackson told Fortune, “We’re looking into alternative payment services, but currently we’re running a cloud service and not getting paid.” Founded in 2009, Seafile has over 250,000 users, many in universities. The service offers an open-source file-synchronization system that organizations can install on their own servers — for a fee, if they want enterprise features — and last October the firm decided to also start offering a paid version that’s hosted on Seafile’s German servers, for individuals and small businesses.

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PayPal Dumped Cloud Company After It Refused To Monitor Customers’ Files

German Dropbox rival Seafile claims PayPal dropped it as a customer after it refused to comply with the payment services company’s demand to spy on its users’ data. In a blog post, the company informed its customers that they can no longer pay for the …

German Dropbox rival Seafile claims PayPal dropped it as a customer after it refused to comply with the payment services company’s demand to spy on its users’ data. In a blog post, the company informed its customers that they can no longer pay for the service using PayPal — the only payment method that Seafile currently relies on. CEO Silja Jackson told Fortune, “We’re looking into alternative payment services, but currently we’re running a cloud service and not getting paid.” Founded in 2009, Seafile has over 250,000 users, many in universities. The service offers an open-source file-synchronization system that organizations can install on their own servers — for a fee, if they want enterprise features — and last October the firm decided to also start offering a paid version that’s hosted on Seafile’s German servers, for individuals and small businesses.

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