Amazon Is Killing Off Its $12/Year Plan For Unlimited Photo Storage

To many’s surprise, Amazon introduced a consumer-focused storage option — unlimited photo backup for only $12 per year. This was Amazon’s attempt to lure customers away from Google, Dropbox, and iCloud. But it seems, even for Amazon, $12 per year for …

To many’s surprise, Amazon introduced a consumer-focused storage option — unlimited photo backup for only $12 per year. This was Amazon’s attempt to lure customers away from Google, Dropbox, and iCloud. But it seems, even for Amazon, $12 per year for so much storage space is not feasible. The company has reportedly started to inform the customers that the plan is being discontinued. PetaPixel reports: Subscribers of the plan, which was launched in March 2015, are taking to the web to report receiving an email from Amazon informing them of the change. Amazon is offering customers free months of the Unlimited Storage plan, which costs $60 per year. It seems that some people are being offered a standard 3-month free trial of the service, while others are being offered a 12-month free period.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

SanDisk’s 1TB SD Card Aims To Solve Your Storage Problems

SanDisk has a new SD card which caught our attention today: a prototype card with a storage of 1TB of memory. The company says that 1TB card is necessary as we increasingly move to the world where more and more content in 4K and 8K become available. ZD…

SanDisk has a new SD card which caught our attention today: a prototype card with a storage of 1TB of memory. The company says that 1TB card is necessary as we increasingly move to the world where more and more content in 4K and 8K become available. ZDNet adds: A few years ago it was inconceivable that anyone would want a 1TB storage card for their camera, but with the rise of 4K and 8K capture, as well as 360-degree video and VR, high-end professionals need all the storage they can get their hands on.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

SanDisk’s 1TB SD Card Aims To Solve Your Storage Problems

SanDisk has a new SD card which caught our attention today: a prototype card with a storage of 1TB of memory. The company says that 1TB card is necessary as we increasingly move to the world where more and more content in 4K and 8K become available. ZD…

SanDisk has a new SD card which caught our attention today: a prototype card with a storage of 1TB of memory. The company says that 1TB card is necessary as we increasingly move to the world where more and more content in 4K and 8K become available. ZDNet adds: A few years ago it was inconceivable that anyone would want a 1TB storage card for their camera, but with the rise of 4K and 8K capture, as well as 360-degree video and VR, high-end professionals need all the storage they can get their hands on.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ask Slashdot: What’s The Best Way To Backup Large Amounts Of Personal Data?

An anonymous Slashdot reader has “approximately two terabytes of photos, currently sitting on two 4-terabyte ‘Intel Rapid Storage’ RAID 1 disks.” But now they’re considering three alternatives after moving to a new PC:

a) Keep these exactly as they ar…

An anonymous Slashdot reader has “approximately two terabytes of photos, currently sitting on two 4-terabyte ‘Intel Rapid Storage’ RAID 1 disks.” But now they’re considering three alternatives after moving to a new PC:

a) Keep these exactly as they are… The current configuration is OK, but it’s a pain if a RAID re-sync is needed as it takes a long time to check four terabytes.
b) Move to “Storage Spaces”. I’ve not used Storage Spaces before, but reports seem to show it’s good… It’s a Good Thing that the disks are 100% identical and removable and readable separately. Downside? Unknown territory.
c) Break the RAID, and set up the second disk as a file-copied backup… [This] would lose a (small) amount of resilience, but wouldn’t suffer from the RAID-sync issues, ideally a Mac-like “TimeMachine” backup would handle file histories.
Any recommendations?

This is also a good time to share your experiences with Storage Spaces, so leave your answers in the comments. What’s the best way to backup large amounts of personal data?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ask Slashdot: What’s The Best Way To Backup Large Amounts Of Personal Data?

An anonymous Slashdot reader has “approximately two terabytes of photos, currently sitting on two 4-terabyte ‘Intel Rapid Storage’ RAID 1 disks.” But now they’re considering three alternatives after moving to a new PC:

a) Keep these exactly as they ar…

An anonymous Slashdot reader has “approximately two terabytes of photos, currently sitting on two 4-terabyte ‘Intel Rapid Storage’ RAID 1 disks.” But now they’re considering three alternatives after moving to a new PC:

a) Keep these exactly as they are… The current configuration is OK, but it’s a pain if a RAID re-sync is needed as it takes a long time to check four terabytes.
b) Move to “Storage Spaces”. I’ve not used Storage Spaces before, but reports seem to show it’s good… It’s a Good Thing that the disks are 100% identical and removable and readable separately. Downside? Unknown territory.
c) Break the RAID, and set up the second disk as a file-copied backup… [This] would lose a (small) amount of resilience, but wouldn’t suffer from the RAID-sync issues, ideally a Mac-like “TimeMachine” backup would handle file histories.
Any recommendations?

This is also a good time to share your experiences with Storage Spaces, so leave your answers in the comments. What’s the best way to backup large amounts of personal data?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

RIP John Ellenby, Godfather of the Modern Laptop

John Ellenby managed the development of the Alto II before starting the company that built the world’s first successful “clamshell” laptop. Slashdot reader fragMasterFlash quotes the New York Times: Ellenby, a British-born computer engineer who played …

John Ellenby managed the development of the Alto II before starting the company that built the world’s first successful “clamshell” laptop. Slashdot reader fragMasterFlash quotes the New York Times: Ellenby, a British-born computer engineer who played a critical role in paving the way for the laptop computer, died on August 17 in San Francisco. He was 75… Mr. Ellenby’s pioneering work came to fruition in the early 1980s, after he founded Grid Systems, a company in Mountain View, California. As chief executive, he assembled an engineering and design team that included the noted British-born industrial designer William Moggridge. The team produced a clamshell computer with an orange electroluminescent flat-panel display that was introduced as the Compass. It went to market in 1982. The Compass is now widely acknowledged to have been far ahead of its time.
Back in the 1980s, NASA used them as backup navigational devices on the space shuttle — one was recovered from the wreckage of the Space Shuttle Challenger — and John Poindexter, America’s national security advisor during the Reagan administration, described them as “built like an armored tank”. Data storage cost $8,150 — equivalent to $20,325 today.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

RIP John Ellenby, Godfather of the Modern Laptop

John Ellenby managed the development of the Alto II before starting the company that built the world’s first successful “clamshell” laptop. Slashdot reader fragMasterFlash quotes the New York Times: Ellenby, a British-born computer engineer who played …

John Ellenby managed the development of the Alto II before starting the company that built the world’s first successful “clamshell” laptop. Slashdot reader fragMasterFlash quotes the New York Times: Ellenby, a British-born computer engineer who played a critical role in paving the way for the laptop computer, died on August 17 in San Francisco. He was 75… Mr. Ellenby’s pioneering work came to fruition in the early 1980s, after he founded Grid Systems, a company in Mountain View, California. As chief executive, he assembled an engineering and design team that included the noted British-born industrial designer William Moggridge. The team produced a clamshell computer with an orange electroluminescent flat-panel display that was introduced as the Compass. It went to market in 1982. The Compass is now widely acknowledged to have been far ahead of its time.
Back in the 1980s, NASA used them as backup navigational devices on the space shuttle — one was recovered from the wreckage of the Space Shuttle Challenger — and John Poindexter, America’s national security advisor during the Reagan administration, described them as “built like an armored tank”. Data storage cost $8,150 — equivalent to $20,325 today.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Intel Launches Flurry of 3D NAND-Based SSDs For Consumer and Enterprise Markets

MojoKid writes: Intel launched a handful of new SSD products today that cover a broad spectrum of applications and employ 3D NAND technology. The SSD 600p Series is offered in four capacities ranging from 128GB, to 256GB, 512GB and 1TB. The drivers are…

MojoKid writes: Intel launched a handful of new SSD products today that cover a broad spectrum of applications and employ 3D NAND technology. The SSD 600p Series is offered in four capacities ranging from 128GB, to 256GB, 512GB and 1TB. The drivers are targeted at consumer desktops and notebooks and are available in the M.2 form-factor. The entry-level 128GB model offers sequential reads and writes of up to 770 MB/sec and 450 MB/sec respectively. At higher densities, the multi-channel 1TB model offers sequential reads and writes that jump to 1,800 MB/sec and 560 MB/sec respectively. The 128GB SSD 600p weighs in at $69, while the 1TB model is priced at $359, or about .36 cents per GiB. For the data center, Intel has also introduced the DC P3520 and DC S3520 Series SSDs in 2.5-inch and PCIe half-height card form-factors. Available in 450GB to 2TB capacities, the range-topping 2TB model offers random reads/writes of 1,700 MB/sec and 1,350 MB/sec respectively. Finally, Intel launched the SSD E 6000p (PCIe M.2) and SSD E 5420s Series (SATA). The former supports Core vPro processors and is targeted at point-of-sale systems and digital signage. The latter is aimed at helping customers ease the transition from HDDs to SSDs in IoT applications.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Seagate Reveals ‘World’s Largest’ 60TB SSD

An anonymous reader writes: While Samsung has the world’s largest commercially available SSD coming in at 15.36TB, Seagate officially has the world’s largest SSD for the enterprise. ZDNet reports: “[While Samsung’s PM1633a has a 2.5-inch form factor,] …

An anonymous reader writes: While Samsung has the world’s largest commercially available SSD coming in at 15.36TB, Seagate officially has the world’s largest SSD for the enterprise. ZDNet reports: “[While Samsung’s PM1633a has a 2.5-inch form factor,] Seagate’s 60TB Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) SSD on the other hand opts for the familiar HDD 3.5-inch form factor. The company says that its drive has “twice the density and four times the capacity” of Samsung’s PM1633a, and is capable of holding up to 400 million photos or 12,000 movies. Seagate thinks the 3.5-inch form factor will be useful for managing changing storage requirements in data centers since it removes the need to support separate form factors for hot and cold data. The company says it could also scale up capacity to 100TB in the same form factor. Seagate says the 60TB SSD is currently only a ‘demonstration technology’ though it could release the product commercially as early as next year. It hasn’t revealed the price of the unit but says it will offer ‘the lowest cost per gigabyte for flash available today.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Seagate Reveals ‘World’s Largest’ 60TB SSD

An anonymous reader writes: While Samsung has the world’s largest commercially available SSD coming in at 15.36TB, Seagate officially has the world’s largest SSD for the enterprise. ZDNet reports: “[While Samsung’s PM1633a has a 2.5-inch form factor,] …

An anonymous reader writes: While Samsung has the world’s largest commercially available SSD coming in at 15.36TB, Seagate officially has the world’s largest SSD for the enterprise. ZDNet reports: “[While Samsung’s PM1633a has a 2.5-inch form factor,] Seagate’s 60TB Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) SSD on the other hand opts for the familiar HDD 3.5-inch form factor. The company says that its drive has “twice the density and four times the capacity” of Samsung’s PM1633a, and is capable of holding up to 400 million photos or 12,000 movies. Seagate thinks the 3.5-inch form factor will be useful for managing changing storage requirements in data centers since it removes the need to support separate form factors for hot and cold data. The company says it could also scale up capacity to 100TB in the same form factor. Seagate says the 60TB SSD is currently only a ‘demonstration technology’ though it could release the product commercially as early as next year. It hasn’t revealed the price of the unit but says it will offer ‘the lowest cost per gigabyte for flash available today.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.