Ask Slashdot: How Do You Store a Half-Petabyte of Data? (And Back It Up?)

An anonymous reader writes: My workplace has recently had two internal groups step forward with a request for almost a half-petabyte of disk to store data. The first is a research project that will computationally analyze a quarter petabyte of data in 100-200MB blobs. The second is looking to archive an ever increasing amount of mixed media. Buying a SAN large enough for these tasks is easy, but how do you present it back to the clients? And how do you back it up? Both projects have expressed a preference for a single human-navigable directory tree. The solution should involve clustered servers providing the connectivity between storage and client so that there is no system downtime. Many SAN solutions have a maximum volume limit of only 16TB, which means some sort of volume concatenation or spanning would be required, but is that recommended? Is anyone out there managing gigantic storage needs like this? How did you do it? What worked, what failed, and what would you do differently?

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This battery case gives a Samsung Galaxy S6 its microSD card slot back

Incipio-offgrid-case-battery-microsd-gs6

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Two things users bemoan about the Samsung Galaxy S6: Its lack of a microSD card slot for storage expansion, and its sealed, non-replaceable battery.

Samsung traded the two features in for a thinner and lighter design made from glass and aluminum — which, in our opinion, was worth it. But if you’re still stingy about losing the features (and have no interest in picking up the equally impressive LG G4), this case from Incipio may interest you.

Called the offGRID, the case comes with a 3,700 milliamp-hour (mAh) battery that can recharge a Galaxy S6 100% and then some. (A Galaxy S6 has a 2,550 mAh battery). That solves the non-removable battery complaint. Read more…

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A Note On Thursday’s Downtime

If you were browsing the site on Thursday, you may have noticed that we went static for a big chunk of the day. A few of you asked what the deal was, so here’s quick follow-up. The short version is that a storage fault led to significant filesystem corruption, and we had to restore a massive amount of data from backups. There’s a post at the SourceForge blog going into a bit more detail, and describing the steps our Siteops team took (and is still taking) to restore service. (Slashdot and SourceForge share a corporate overlord, as well as a fair bit of infrastructure.)

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Samsung Releases First 2TB Consumer SSD For Laptops

Lucas123 writes: Samsung has released what it is calling the world’s first 2.5-in consumer-grade, multi-terabyte SSD, and it’s issuing the new drive a 10-year warranty. With up to 2TB of capacity, the new 850 Pro and 850 EVO SSDs double the maximum capacity of their predecessors. As with the previous 840 Pro and EVO models, Samsung used its 3D V-NAND technology, which stacks 32 layers of NAND atop one another in a microscopic skyscraper. Additionally, the drives take advantage of multi-level cell (MLC) and triple-level cell (TLC) (2- and 3-bit per cell) technology for even greater density. The 850 Pro, Samsung said, can manage up to 550MBps sequential read and 520MBps sequential write rates and up to 100,000 random I/Os per second (IOPS). The 850 EVO SSD has slightly lower performance with 540MBps and 520MBps sequential read/write rates and up to 90,000 random IOPS. The SSDs will range in capacity from 120GB to 2TB and in price from $99 to $999.

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EMC Sells Cloud Sync And Share Product Syncplicity To Private Equity Firm

Journey to private cloud starts now sign from EMC. When EMC bought cloud sync and share company, Syncplicity in 2012, it seemed the company was trying to change the way it does business, but three years later it’s selling out to private equity firm, Skyview Capital, perhaps ready to concede that a freemium cloud model doesn’t fit the company culture. It’s worth noting that EMC will maintain a stake in Syncplicity, but the… Read More

Where Facebook Stores 900 Million New Photos Per Day

1sockchuck writes: Facebook faces unique storage challenges. Its users upload 900 million new images daily, most of which are only viewed for a couple of days. The social network has built specialized cold storage facilities to manage these rarely-accessed photos. Data Center Frontier goes inside this facility, providing a closer look at Facebook’s newest strategy: Using thousands of Blu-Ray disks to store images, complete with a robotic retrieval system (see video demo). Others are interested as well. Sony recently acquired a Blu-Ray storage startup founded by Open Compute chairman Frank Frankovsky, which hopes to drive enterprise adoption of optical data storage.

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When Will Your Hard Drive Fail?

jfruh writes: Tech writer Andy Patrizio suffered his most catastrophic hard drive failure in 25 years of computing recently, which prompted him to delve into the questions of which hard drives fail and when. One intriguing theory behind some failure rates involve a crisis in the industry that arose from the massive 2011 floods in Thailand, home to the global hard drive industry.

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Docker, CoreOS, Google, Microsoft, Amazon And Others Come Together To Develop Common Container Standard

DSC00360 Docker, CoreOS, Google, Microsoft and Amazon are now working on a new standard for software containers with the help of the Linux Foundation. Other members of this coalition include Apcera, Cisco, EMC, Fujitsu Limited, Goldman Sachs, HP, Huawei, IBM, Intel, Joyent, Mesosphere, Pivotal, Rancher Labs, Red Hat and VMware — that is, virtually everybody who has a stake in building a… Read More

Docker Makes Containers More Portable With New Networking Stack, Adds Plug-In Support

DSC00286 Docker is holding its developer conference in San Francisco today, so it’s no surprise that the company is rolling out quite a few updates to its software container solution. Maybe the biggest announcement of the day is the launch of the Open Container Project — an attempt to create a standard container format and runtime under the Linux Foundation that’s supported by the… Read More

1 In 3 Data Center Servers Is a Zombie

dcblogs writes with these snippets from a ComputerWorld story about a study that says nearly a third of all data-center servers are are comatose (“using energy but delivering no useful information”). What’s remarkable is this percentage hasn’t changed since 2008, when a separate study showed the same thing. … A server is considered comatose if it hasn’t done anything for at least six months. The high number of such servers “is a massive indictment of how data centers are managed and operated,” said Jonathan Koomey, a research fellow at Stanford University, who has done data center energy research for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. “It’s not a technical issue as much as a management issue.”

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