storage

Amazon’s AWS Quietly Acquired NoSQL Database Migration Startup Amiato In May 2014

Screen Shot 2015-04-20 at 16.29.50 Amazon Web Services, the enterprise division of the e-commerce and cloud services giant, has been growing its reach in data warehousing and big data analytics by way of Redshift, a hosted product that it launched in 2012 and is now AWS’s fastest growing product “ever”, according to CTO Werner Vogels. Along with input from AWS’s own in-house engineering teams, it… Read More

Kingston HyperX Predator SSD Takes Gumstick M.2 PCIe Drives To 1.4GB/sec

MojoKid writes Kingston recently launched their HyperX Predator PCIe SSD that is targeted at performance-minded PC enthusiasts but is much less expensive than enterprise-class PCIe offerings that are currently in market. Kits are available in a couple of capacities and from factors at 240GB and 480GB. All of the drives adhere to the 80mm M.2 2280 “gumstick” form factor and have PCIe 2.0 x4 connections, but are sold both with and without a half-height, half-length adapter card if you’d like to drop it into a standard PCI Express slot. At the heart of the Kingston HyperX Predator is Marvel’s latest Marvell 88SS9293 controller. The Marvell 88SS9293 is paired to a gigabyte of DDR3 memory and Toshiba A19 Toggle NAND. The drives are rated for read speeds up to 1.4GB/s and writes of 1GB/s and 130 – 160K random 4K IOPS. In the benchmarks, the 480GB model put up strong numbers. At roughly $1 per GiB, the HyperX Predator is about on par with Intel’s faster SSD 750 but unlike Intel’s new NVMe solution, the Kingston drive will work in all legacy platforms as well, not just Z97 and X99 boards with a compatible UEFI BIOS.

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Samsung SSD On a Tiny M.2 Stick Is Capable of Read Speeds Over 2GB/sec

MojoKid writes: Samsung has just announced its new SM951-NVMe SSD, the industry’s first NVMe SSD to employ an M.2 form-factor. Samsung says the new gumstick style drive is capable of sequential read and write speeds of 2,260 MB/sec and 1,600 MB/sec respectively. Comparable SATA-based M.2 SSDs typically can only push read/write speeds of 540 MB/sec and 500 MB/sec, while most standard PCIe versions muster just north of 1GB/sec. The Samsung SM951-NVMe’s performance is actually very comparable to the Intel SSD 750 Series PCIe x4 card but should help kick notebook performance up a notch in this common platform configuration.

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New Samsung SSD 840 EVO Read Performance Fix Coming Later This Month

An anonymous reader writes: The Samsung SSD 840 EVO read performance bug has been on the table for over six months now. Initially Samsung acknowledged the issue fairly quickly and provided a fix only a month after the news hit the mainstream tech media, but reports of read performance degradation surfaced again a few weeks after the fix had been released, making it clear that the first fix didn’t solve the issue for all users. Two months ago Samsung announced that a new fix is in the works and last week Samsung sent out the new firmware along with Magician 4.6 for testing, which will be available to the public later this month.

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Lyve Lets You Build Shared Photo Albums With Friends – Or Anyone Else Nearby

iphone_6_mix Collaborative photo albums is the startup idea that just won’t die. Today, photo-sharing and organization app Lyve is rolling out a new feature which will allow anyone to create photo albums with others in their same location, whether that’s at a wedding, a concert, a festival, a party, or anything else. With “Mix,” as this new addition is called, users will be able… Read More

Ask Slashdot: Best Medium For Storing Data To Survive a Fire (or Other Disaster)

First time accepted submitter aka_bigred writes Every year as I file my taxes, I replicate my most important financial data (a couple GB of data) to store an offline copy in my fire-rated home safe. This gets me thinking about what the most reliable data media would be to keep in my fire-rated home safe. CDs/DVDs/tapes could easily melt or warp rendering them useless, so I’m very hesitant to use them. I’ve seen more exotic solutions that let you print your digital data to paper an optically re-import it later should you ever need it, but it seems overly cumbersome and error prone should it be damaged or fire scorched. That leaves my best options being either a classic magnetic platter drive, or some sort of solid state storage, like SD cards, USB flash drives, or a small SSD. The problem is, I can’t decide which would survive better if ever exposed to extreme temperatures, or water damage should my house burn down. Most people would just suggest to store it in “the cloud”, but I’m naturally averse to doing so because that means someone else is responsible for my data and I could loose it to hackers, the entity going out of business, etc. Once it leaves my home, I no longer fully control it, which is unacceptable. My thought being “they can’t hack/steal what they can’t physically access.” What medium do other Slashdot users use to store their most important data (under say 5GB worth) in an at-home safe to protect it from fire?

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220TB Tapes Show Tape Storage Still Has a Long Future

alphadogg writes: IBM and Fujifilm have figured out how to fit 220TB of data on a standard-size tape that fits in your hand, flexing the technology’s strengths as a long-term storage medium. The prototype Fujifilm tape and accompanying drive technology from IBM labs packs 88 times as much data onto a tape as industry-standard LTO-6 systems using the same size cartridge, IBM says. LTO6 tape can hold 2.5TB, uncompressed, on a cartridge about 4 by 4 inches across and 2 centimeters thick. The new technologies won’t come out in products for several years.

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220TB Tapes Show Tape Storage Still Has a Long Future

alphadogg writes: IBM and Fujifilm have figured out how to fit 220TB of data on a standard-size tape that fits in your hand, flexing the technology’s strengths as a long-term storage medium. The prototype Fujifilm tape and accompanying drive technology from IBM labs packs 88 times as much data onto a tape as industry-standard LTO-6 systems using the same size cartridge, IBM says. LTO6 tape can hold 2.5TB, uncompressed, on a cartridge about 4 by 4 inches across and 2 centimeters thick. The new technologies won’t come out in products for several years.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Mophie expands its ‘Space’ storage accessories to iPhone 6 and iPad mini

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Having conquered the battery pack world and establishing itself as a company that makes quality mobile accessories, Mophie’s now ready to tackle the next big mobile challenge: storage.

Last year, Mophie released the Space Pack for the iPhone 5 and 5S, a twofer battery pack case that also contained additional flash storage. For phase two, the company’s expanding the Space Pack to the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, and iPad mini. There’s also a new universal battery bank/storage solution called the Spacestation and a redesigned file management app called Space that now works without Mophie hardware.

More about Storage, Samsung, Mophie, Iphone 6, and Tech


Intel Launches SSD 750 Series Consumer NVMe PCI Express SSD At Under $1 Per GiB

MojoKid writes Today, Intel took the wraps off new NVMe PCI Express Solid State Drives, which are the first products with these high speed interfaces, that the company has launched specifically for the enthusiast computing and workstation market. Historically, Intel’s PCI Express-based offerings, like the SSD DC P3700 Series, have been targeted for datacenter or enterprise applications, with price tags to match. However, the Intel SSD 750 Series PCI Express SSD, though based on the same custom NVMe controller technology as the company’s expensive P3700 drive, will drop in at less than a dollar per GiB, while offering performance almost on par with its enterprise-class sibling. Available in 400GB and 1.2TB capacities, the Intel SSD 750 is able to hit peak read and write bandwidth numbers of 2.4GB/sec and 1.2GB/sec, respectively. In the benchmarks, it takes many of the top PCIe SSD cards to task easily and at $389 for a 400GB model, you won’t have to sell an organ to afford one.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.