Ask Slashdot: What’s The Best Way To Backup Large Amounts Of Personal Data?

An anonymous Slashdot reader has “approximately two terabytes of photos, currently sitting on two 4-terabyte ‘Intel Rapid Storage’ RAID 1 disks.” But now they’re considering three alternatives after moving to a new PC:

a) Keep these exactly as they ar…

An anonymous Slashdot reader has “approximately two terabytes of photos, currently sitting on two 4-terabyte ‘Intel Rapid Storage’ RAID 1 disks.” But now they’re considering three alternatives after moving to a new PC:

a) Keep these exactly as they are… The current configuration is OK, but it’s a pain if a RAID re-sync is needed as it takes a long time to check four terabytes.
b) Move to “Storage Spaces”. I’ve not used Storage Spaces before, but reports seem to show it’s good… It’s a Good Thing that the disks are 100% identical and removable and readable separately. Downside? Unknown territory.
c) Break the RAID, and set up the second disk as a file-copied backup… [This] would lose a (small) amount of resilience, but wouldn’t suffer from the RAID-sync issues, ideally a Mac-like “TimeMachine” backup would handle file histories.
Any recommendations?

This is also a good time to share your experiences with Storage Spaces, so leave your answers in the comments. What’s the best way to backup large amounts of personal data?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ask Slashdot: What’s The Best Way To Backup Large Amounts Of Personal Data?

An anonymous Slashdot reader has “approximately two terabytes of photos, currently sitting on two 4-terabyte ‘Intel Rapid Storage’ RAID 1 disks.” But now they’re considering three alternatives after moving to a new PC:

a) Keep these exactly as they ar…

An anonymous Slashdot reader has “approximately two terabytes of photos, currently sitting on two 4-terabyte ‘Intel Rapid Storage’ RAID 1 disks.” But now they’re considering three alternatives after moving to a new PC:

a) Keep these exactly as they are… The current configuration is OK, but it’s a pain if a RAID re-sync is needed as it takes a long time to check four terabytes.
b) Move to “Storage Spaces”. I’ve not used Storage Spaces before, but reports seem to show it’s good… It’s a Good Thing that the disks are 100% identical and removable and readable separately. Downside? Unknown territory.
c) Break the RAID, and set up the second disk as a file-copied backup… [This] would lose a (small) amount of resilience, but wouldn’t suffer from the RAID-sync issues, ideally a Mac-like “TimeMachine” backup would handle file histories.
Any recommendations?

This is also a good time to share your experiences with Storage Spaces, so leave your answers in the comments. What’s the best way to backup large amounts of personal data?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

RIP John Ellenby, Godfather of the Modern Laptop

John Ellenby managed the development of the Alto II before starting the company that built the world’s first successful “clamshell” laptop. Slashdot reader fragMasterFlash quotes the New York Times: Ellenby, a British-born computer engineer who played …

John Ellenby managed the development of the Alto II before starting the company that built the world’s first successful “clamshell” laptop. Slashdot reader fragMasterFlash quotes the New York Times: Ellenby, a British-born computer engineer who played a critical role in paving the way for the laptop computer, died on August 17 in San Francisco. He was 75… Mr. Ellenby’s pioneering work came to fruition in the early 1980s, after he founded Grid Systems, a company in Mountain View, California. As chief executive, he assembled an engineering and design team that included the noted British-born industrial designer William Moggridge. The team produced a clamshell computer with an orange electroluminescent flat-panel display that was introduced as the Compass. It went to market in 1982. The Compass is now widely acknowledged to have been far ahead of its time.
Back in the 1980s, NASA used them as backup navigational devices on the space shuttle — one was recovered from the wreckage of the Space Shuttle Challenger — and John Poindexter, America’s national security advisor during the Reagan administration, described them as “built like an armored tank”. Data storage cost $8,150 — equivalent to $20,325 today.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

RIP John Ellenby, Godfather of the Modern Laptop

John Ellenby managed the development of the Alto II before starting the company that built the world’s first successful “clamshell” laptop. Slashdot reader fragMasterFlash quotes the New York Times: Ellenby, a British-born computer engineer who played …

John Ellenby managed the development of the Alto II before starting the company that built the world’s first successful “clamshell” laptop. Slashdot reader fragMasterFlash quotes the New York Times: Ellenby, a British-born computer engineer who played a critical role in paving the way for the laptop computer, died on August 17 in San Francisco. He was 75… Mr. Ellenby’s pioneering work came to fruition in the early 1980s, after he founded Grid Systems, a company in Mountain View, California. As chief executive, he assembled an engineering and design team that included the noted British-born industrial designer William Moggridge. The team produced a clamshell computer with an orange electroluminescent flat-panel display that was introduced as the Compass. It went to market in 1982. The Compass is now widely acknowledged to have been far ahead of its time.
Back in the 1980s, NASA used them as backup navigational devices on the space shuttle — one was recovered from the wreckage of the Space Shuttle Challenger — and John Poindexter, America’s national security advisor during the Reagan administration, described them as “built like an armored tank”. Data storage cost $8,150 — equivalent to $20,325 today.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Intel Launches Flurry of 3D NAND-Based SSDs For Consumer and Enterprise Markets

MojoKid writes: Intel launched a handful of new SSD products today that cover a broad spectrum of applications and employ 3D NAND technology. The SSD 600p Series is offered in four capacities ranging from 128GB, to 256GB, 512GB and 1TB. The drivers are…

MojoKid writes: Intel launched a handful of new SSD products today that cover a broad spectrum of applications and employ 3D NAND technology. The SSD 600p Series is offered in four capacities ranging from 128GB, to 256GB, 512GB and 1TB. The drivers are targeted at consumer desktops and notebooks and are available in the M.2 form-factor. The entry-level 128GB model offers sequential reads and writes of up to 770 MB/sec and 450 MB/sec respectively. At higher densities, the multi-channel 1TB model offers sequential reads and writes that jump to 1,800 MB/sec and 560 MB/sec respectively. The 128GB SSD 600p weighs in at $69, while the 1TB model is priced at $359, or about .36 cents per GiB. For the data center, Intel has also introduced the DC P3520 and DC S3520 Series SSDs in 2.5-inch and PCIe half-height card form-factors. Available in 450GB to 2TB capacities, the range-topping 2TB model offers random reads/writes of 1,700 MB/sec and 1,350 MB/sec respectively. Finally, Intel launched the SSD E 6000p (PCIe M.2) and SSD E 5420s Series (SATA). The former supports Core vPro processors and is targeted at point-of-sale systems and digital signage. The latter is aimed at helping customers ease the transition from HDDs to SSDs in IoT applications.

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Seagate Reveals ‘World’s Largest’ 60TB SSD

An anonymous reader writes: While Samsung has the world’s largest commercially available SSD coming in at 15.36TB, Seagate officially has the world’s largest SSD for the enterprise. ZDNet reports: “[While Samsung’s PM1633a has a 2.5-inch form factor,] …

An anonymous reader writes: While Samsung has the world’s largest commercially available SSD coming in at 15.36TB, Seagate officially has the world’s largest SSD for the enterprise. ZDNet reports: “[While Samsung’s PM1633a has a 2.5-inch form factor,] Seagate’s 60TB Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) SSD on the other hand opts for the familiar HDD 3.5-inch form factor. The company says that its drive has “twice the density and four times the capacity” of Samsung’s PM1633a, and is capable of holding up to 400 million photos or 12,000 movies. Seagate thinks the 3.5-inch form factor will be useful for managing changing storage requirements in data centers since it removes the need to support separate form factors for hot and cold data. The company says it could also scale up capacity to 100TB in the same form factor. Seagate says the 60TB SSD is currently only a ‘demonstration technology’ though it could release the product commercially as early as next year. It hasn’t revealed the price of the unit but says it will offer ‘the lowest cost per gigabyte for flash available today.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Seagate Reveals ‘World’s Largest’ 60TB SSD

An anonymous reader writes: While Samsung has the world’s largest commercially available SSD coming in at 15.36TB, Seagate officially has the world’s largest SSD for the enterprise. ZDNet reports: “[While Samsung’s PM1633a has a 2.5-inch form factor,] …

An anonymous reader writes: While Samsung has the world’s largest commercially available SSD coming in at 15.36TB, Seagate officially has the world’s largest SSD for the enterprise. ZDNet reports: “[While Samsung’s PM1633a has a 2.5-inch form factor,] Seagate’s 60TB Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) SSD on the other hand opts for the familiar HDD 3.5-inch form factor. The company says that its drive has “twice the density and four times the capacity” of Samsung’s PM1633a, and is capable of holding up to 400 million photos or 12,000 movies. Seagate thinks the 3.5-inch form factor will be useful for managing changing storage requirements in data centers since it removes the need to support separate form factors for hot and cold data. The company says it could also scale up capacity to 100TB in the same form factor. Seagate says the 60TB SSD is currently only a ‘demonstration technology’ though it could release the product commercially as early as next year. It hasn’t revealed the price of the unit but says it will offer ‘the lowest cost per gigabyte for flash available today.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

8TB Drives Are Highly Reliable, Says Backblaze

An anonymous reader writes from a report via Yahoo News: Cloud backup and storage provider Backblaze has published its hard drive stats for Q2 2016. Yahoo News reports: “The report is based on data drives, not boot drives, that are deployed across the …

An anonymous reader writes from a report via Yahoo News: Cloud backup and storage provider Backblaze has published its hard drive stats for Q2 2016. Yahoo News reports: “The report is based on data drives, not boot drives, that are deployed across the company’s data centers in quantities of 45 or more. According to the report, the company saw an annualized failure rate of 19.81 percent with the Seagate ST4000DX000 4TB drive in a quantity of 197 units working 18,428 days. The next in line was the WD WD40EFRX 4TB drive in a quantity of 46 units working 4,186 days. This model had an annualized failure rate of 8.72 percent for that quarter. The company’s report also notes that it finally introduced 8TB hard drives into its fold: first with a mere 45 8TB HGST units and then over 2,700 units from Seagate crammed into the company’s Blackblaze Vaults, which include 20 Storage Pods containing 45 drives each. The company moved to 8TB drives to optimize storage density. According to a chart provided in the report, the 8TB drives are highly reliable. The HGST HDS5C8080ALE600 worked for 22,858 days and only saw two failures, generating an annualized failure rate of 3.20 percent. The Seagate ST8000DM002 worked for 44,000 days and only saw four failures, generating an annual failure rate of 3.30 percent.” For comparison, Backblaze’s reliability report for Q1 2016 can be found here. UPDATE 8/2/16: Corrected Seagate Model “DT8000DM002” to “ST8000DM002.”

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Researchers Develop Atomic-Scale Hard Drive That Writes Information Atom By Atom

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Researchers in the Netherlands have created a microscopic storage system that encodes every bit with a single atom — allowing them to fit a kilobyte in a space under 100 nanometers across. That tran…

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Researchers in the Netherlands have created a microscopic storage system that encodes every bit with a single atom — allowing them to fit a kilobyte in a space under 100 nanometers across. That translates to a storage density of about 500 terabits per square inch. For comparison, those 4-terabyte hard drives you can buy today are about 1 terabit per square inch. That’s because, unlike this new system, they use hundreds or thousands of atoms to store a single bit. “Every bit consists of two positions on a surface of copper atoms, and one chlorine atom that we can slide back and forth between these two positions,” explained Sander Otte, lead scientist at Delft University of Technology, in a news release. Because chlorine on copper forms into a perfectly square grid, it’s easy (relatively, anyway) to position and read them. If the chlorine atom is up top, that’s a 1; if it’s at the bottom, that’s a 0. Put 8 chlorine atoms in a row and they form a byte. The data the researchers chose to demonstrate this was a fragment of a Feynman lecture, “There’s plenty of room at the bottom” (PDF) — fittingly, about storing data at extremely small scales. (You can see a high-resolution image of the array here.) The chlorine-copper array is only stable in a clean vacuum and at 77 kelvin — about the temperature of liquid nitrogen. Anything past that and heat will disrupt the organization of the atoms. The research was published today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

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Encrypted DNA Storage Investigated by DOE Researchers

Biological engineers at a Department of Energy lab “are experimenting with encrypted DNA storage for archival applications.” Slashdot reader ancientribe shares an article from Dark Reading:
Using this method, the researchers could theoretically store 2…

Biological engineers at a Department of Energy lab “are experimenting with encrypted DNA storage for archival applications.” Slashdot reader ancientribe shares an article from Dark Reading:
Using this method, the researchers could theoretically store 2.2 petabytes of information in one gram of DNA. That’s 200 times the printed material at the Library of Congress… Instead of needing a 15,000 square-foot building to store 35,000 boxes of inactive records and archival documents, Sandia National Laboratories can potentially store information on much less paper, in powder form, in test tubes or petri dishes, or even as a bacterial cell… “Hard drives fail and very often the data can’t be recovered,” explains Bachand. “With DNA, it’s possible to recover strands that are 10,000 to 20,000 years old… even if someone sneezes and the powder is lost, it’s possible to recover all the information by just recovering one DNA molecule.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.