storage

No, Your SSD Won’t Quickly Lose Data While Powered Down

An anonymous reader writes: A few weeks ago, we discussed reports that enterprise SSDs would lose data in a surprisingly short amount of time if left powered off. The reports were based on a presentation from Alvin Cox, a Seagate engineer, about enterprise storage practices. PCWorld spoke to him and another engineer for Seagate, and they say the whole thing was blown out of proportion. Alan Cox said, “I wouldn’t worry about (losing data). This all pertains to end of life. As a consumer, an SSD product or even a flash product is never going to get to the point where it’s temperature-dependent on retaining the data.” The intent of the original presentation was to set expectations for a worst case scenario — a data center writing huge amounts of data to old SSDs and then storing them long-term at unusual temperatures. It’s not a very realistic situation for businesses with responsible IT departments, and almost impossible for personal drives.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

No, Your SSD Won’t Quickly Lose Data While Powered Down

An anonymous reader writes: A few weeks ago, we discussed reports that enterprise SSDs would lose data in a surprisingly short amount of time if left powered off. The reports were based on a presentation from Alvin Cox, a Seagate engineer, about enterprise storage practices. PCWorld spoke to him and another engineer for Seagate, and they say the whole thing was blown out of proportion. Alan Cox said, “I wouldn’t worry about (losing data). This all pertains to end of life. As a consumer, an SSD product or even a flash product is never going to get to the point where it’s temperature-dependent on retaining the data.” The intent of the original presentation was to set expectations for a worst case scenario — a data center writing huge amounts of data to old SSDs and then storing them long-term at unusual temperatures. It’s not a very realistic situation for businesses with responsible IT departments, and almost impossible for personal drives.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Egnyte Updates Its Enterprise File Sharing Apps, Hits Up The Apple Watch

7048321621_464e84d85f_k Egnyte, a company that focuses on enterprise file sharing, providing an intelligent layer between cloud solutions and on-premises storage, updated its mobile apps today, adding the Apple Watch to its stack. The company’s mobile refresh includes its Android, iOS and Windows apps. Read More

Egnyte Updates Its Enterprise File Sharing Apps, Hits Up The Apple Watch

7048321621_464e84d85f_k Egnyte, a company that focuses on enterprise file sharing, providing an intelligent layer between cloud solutions and on-premises storage, updated its mobile apps today, adding the Apple Watch to its stack. The company’s mobile refresh includes its Android, iOS and Windows apps. Read More

Enterprise SSDs, Powered Off, Potentially Lose Data In a Week

New submitter Mal-2 writes with a selection from IB Times of special interest for anyone replacing hard disks with solid state drives:

The standards body for the microelectronics industry has found that Solid State Drives (SSD) can start to lose their data and become corrupted if they are left without power for as little as a week. … According to a recent presentation (PDF) by Seagate’s Alvin Cox, who is also chairman of the Joint Electron Device Engineering Council (JEDEC), the period of time that data will be retained on an SSD is halved for every 5 degrees Celsius (9 degrees Fahrenheit) rise in temperature in the area where the SSD is stored. If you have switched to SSD for either personal or business use, do you follow the recommendation here that spinning-disk media be used as backup as well?

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Samsung’s SSD 840 Read Performance Degradation Explained

An anonymous reader writes with a link to TechSpot’s explanation of the reason behind the performance degradation noticed by many purchasers of certain models of Samsung SSD (the 840 and 840 EVO), and an evaluation of the firmware updates that the firm has released to address is. From the piece, a mixed but positive opinion of the second and latest of these firmware releases: “It’s not an elegant fix, and it’s also a fix that will degrade the lifetime of the NAND since the total numbers of writes it’s meant to withstand is limited. But as we have witnessed in Tech Report’s extensive durability test there is a ton of headroom in how NAND is rated, so in my opinion this is not a problem. Heck, the Samsung 840 even outlasted two MLC drives.
As of writing, the new firmware has only been released for the 2.5” model of the SSD 840 EVO, so users of the 840 EVO mSATA model still have to be patient. It should also be noted that the new firmware does not seem to work well with the TRIM implementation in Linux, as this user shared how file system corruption occurs if discard is enabled.”

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DataGravity’s Paula Long Talks Storage And Billion-Dollar Exits

paula-long16 Today at TechCrunch Disrupt NY, DataGravity’s Paula Long took to the stage with our very own Ron Miller to discuss how to sell your startup, and why she came back for what Miller calls “another whack at the ball.” Long noted that her prior company, EqualLogic, was “minutes” away from going public before it sold to Dell for $1.4 billion. According to Long,… Read More

Amazon’s AWS Quietly Acquired NoSQL Database Migration Startup Amiato In May 2014

Screen Shot 2015-04-20 at 16.29.50 Amazon Web Services, the enterprise division of the e-commerce and cloud services giant, has been growing its reach in data warehousing and big data analytics by way of Redshift, a hosted product that it launched in 2012 and is now AWS’s fastest growing product “ever”, according to CTO Werner Vogels. Along with input from AWS’s own in-house engineering teams, it… Read More

Kingston HyperX Predator SSD Takes Gumstick M.2 PCIe Drives To 1.4GB/sec

MojoKid writes Kingston recently launched their HyperX Predator PCIe SSD that is targeted at performance-minded PC enthusiasts but is much less expensive than enterprise-class PCIe offerings that are currently in market. Kits are available in a couple of capacities and from factors at 240GB and 480GB. All of the drives adhere to the 80mm M.2 2280 “gumstick” form factor and have PCIe 2.0 x4 connections, but are sold both with and without a half-height, half-length adapter card if you’d like to drop it into a standard PCI Express slot. At the heart of the Kingston HyperX Predator is Marvel’s latest Marvell 88SS9293 controller. The Marvell 88SS9293 is paired to a gigabyte of DDR3 memory and Toshiba A19 Toggle NAND. The drives are rated for read speeds up to 1.4GB/s and writes of 1GB/s and 130 – 160K random 4K IOPS. In the benchmarks, the 480GB model put up strong numbers. At roughly $1 per GiB, the HyperX Predator is about on par with Intel’s faster SSD 750 but unlike Intel’s new NVMe solution, the Kingston drive will work in all legacy platforms as well, not just Z97 and X99 boards with a compatible UEFI BIOS.

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Samsung SSD On a Tiny M.2 Stick Is Capable of Read Speeds Over 2GB/sec

MojoKid writes: Samsung has just announced its new SM951-NVMe SSD, the industry’s first NVMe SSD to employ an M.2 form-factor. Samsung says the new gumstick style drive is capable of sequential read and write speeds of 2,260 MB/sec and 1,600 MB/sec respectively. Comparable SATA-based M.2 SSDs typically can only push read/write speeds of 540 MB/sec and 500 MB/sec, while most standard PCIe versions muster just north of 1GB/sec. The Samsung SM951-NVMe’s performance is actually very comparable to the Intel SSD 750 Series PCIe x4 card but should help kick notebook performance up a notch in this common platform configuration.

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