storage

SanDisk crammed 200GB into a fingernail-sized microSD card

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There’s no such thing as too much storage in too small a space. That’s what SanDisk, one of the world’s largest and most popular storage manufacturers would like you to believe.

SanDisk announced on Sunday at Mobile World Conference the world’s first 200GB microSD card

No, there isn’t an extra zero at the end on that number. The 200GB Ultra microSDXC UHS-I card, Premium Card comes one year after the company released its then-earth-shattering 128GB microSD card.

The 200GB microSD card is the new record holder for world’s highest capacity microSD card with 56 percent more storage than the 128GB one. The card can transfer up to 1,200 photos in a minute at up to 90 megabytes per second and hold up to 20 hours of full HD (1080p) resolution video. Read more…

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New Seagate Shingled Hard Drive Teardown

New submitter Peter Desnoyers writes: Shingled Magnetic Recording (SMR) drives are starting to hit the market, promising larger drives without heroic (and expensive) measures such as helium fill, but at a cost — data can no longer be over-written in place, requiring SSD-like algorithms to handle random writes. At the USENIX File and Storage Technologies conference in February, researchers from Northeastern University (disclaimer — I’m one of them) dissected shingled drive performance both figuratively and literally, using both micro-benchmarks and a window cut in the drive to uncover the secrets of Seagate’s first line of publicly-available SMR drives. TL;DR: It’s a pretty good desktop drive — with write cache enabled (the default for non-server setups) and an intermittent workload it performs quite well, handling bursts of random writes (up to a few tens of GB total) far faster than a conventional drive — but only if it has long powered-on idle periods for garbage collection. Reads and large writes run at about the same speed as on a conventional drive, and at $280 it costs less than a pair of decent 4TB drives. For heavily-loaded server applications, though, you might want to wait for the next generation. Here are a couple videos (in 16x slow motion) showing the drive in action — sequential read after deliberately fragmenting the drive, and a few thousand random writes.

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Ask Slashdot: How Does One Verify Hard Drive Firmware?

An anonymous reader writes: In light of recent revelations from Kaspersky Labs about the Equation Group and persistent hard drive malware, I was curious about how easy it might be to verify my own system’s drives to see if they were infected. I have no real reason to think they would be, but I was dismayed by the total lack of tools to independently verify such a thing. For instance, Seagate’s firmware download pages provide files with no external hash, something Linux distributions do for all of their packages. Neither do they seem to provide a utility to read off the current firmware from a drive and verify its integrity. Are there any utilities to do such a thing? Why don’t these companies provide verification software to users? Has anyone compiled and posted a public list of known-good firmware hashes for the major hard drive vendors and models? This seems to be a critical hole in PC security. I did contact Seagate support asking for hashes of their latest firmware; I got a response stating, “…If you download the firmware directly from our website there is no risk on the file be tampered with.” (Their phrasing, not mine.) Methinks somebody hasn’t been keeping up with world events lately.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Of mice and Macs: Watch your technology transform over time

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What we think of as 21st century technology has been with us for more years than many of us have been alive. Even cloud-based storage has its roots in the 1970s

Technology network Experts-Exchange thought it might be fun to see the progression of storage solutions — from 8-inch floppy discs to the cloud — in an animation

Once they got started, Experts-Exchange went looking for other oft-used computing technologies, hoping to piece together a rapid visual history for laptops, Apple Macs and computer mice

The animations below offer images of the original devices, which transform from one generation of technology to another. Also shown are details about when they appeared and how much bang you got for your buck — how much storage space your got with a 5-in. floppy, for example, versus a 3.5-inch disc Read more…

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Sony Offers a "Premium Sound" SD Card For a Premium Price

nateman1352 (971364) writes “Don’t you just hate all that noise your memory cards make? No? Then you probably aren’t going to want to buy Sony’s new $160 memory cards, which the company brags offers “Premium Sound” that generates less electrical noise when reading data.” As long as it works well with my hi-fi ethernet cable.

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Samsung’s Portable SSD T1 Tested

MojoKid writes The bulk of today’s high-capacity external storage devices still rely on mechanical hard disk drives with spinning media and other delicate parts. Solid state drives are much faster and less susceptible to damage from vibration, of course. That being the case, Samsung saw an opportunity to capitalize on a market segment that hasn’t seen enough development it seems–external SSDs. There are already external storage devices that use full-sized SSDs, but Samsung’s new Portable SSD T1 is more akin to a thumb drive, only a little wider and typically much faster. Utilizing Samsung’s 3D Vertical NAND (V-NAND) technology and a SuperSpeed USB 3.0 interface, the Portable SSD T1 redlines at up to 450MB/s when reading or writing data sequentially, claims Samsung. For random read and write activities, Samsung rates the drive at up to 8,000 IOPS and 21,000 IOPS, respectively. Pricing is more in-line with high-performance standalone SSDs, with this 1TB model reviewed here arriving at about $579. In testing, the drive did live up to its performance and bandwidth claims as well.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Samsung’s Portable SSD T1 Tested

MojoKid writes The bulk of today’s high-capacity external storage devices still rely on mechanical hard disk drives with spinning media and other delicate parts. Solid state drives are much faster and less susceptible to damage from vibration, of course. That being the case, Samsung saw an opportunity to capitalize on a market segment that hasn’t seen enough development it seems–external SSDs. There are already external storage devices that use full-sized SSDs, but Samsung’s new Portable SSD T1 is more akin to a thumb drive, only a little wider and typically much faster. Utilizing Samsung’s 3D Vertical NAND (V-NAND) technology and a SuperSpeed USB 3.0 interface, the Portable SSD T1 redlines at up to 450MB/s when reading or writing data sequentially, claims Samsung. For random read and write activities, Samsung rates the drive at up to 8,000 IOPS and 21,000 IOPS, respectively. Pricing is more in-line with high-performance standalone SSDs, with this 1TB model reviewed here arriving at about $579. In testing, the drive did live up to its performance and bandwidth claims as well.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Storing Data In Synthetic Fossils

Bismillah tips news of research from ETH Zurich which brings the possibility of extremely long-term data storage. The scientists encoded data in DNA, a young but established technique that has a major problem: accuracy. “[E]ven a short period of time presents a problem in terms of the margin of error, as mistakes occur in the writing and reading of the DNA. Over the longer term, DNA can change significantly as it reacts chemically with the environment, thus presenting an obstacle to long-term storage.” To get around this issue, they encapsulated the DNA within tiny silica spheres, a process roughly comparable to the fossilization of bones (abstract). The researchers say data can be preserved this way for over a million years.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Backed By $4 Million, Bevy Debuts A Photo And Video Storage Solution The Whole Family Can Share

Bevy Lifestyle_Hero Shot Families today often have more photo-taking devices than family members, which has led to the problem of people having massive numbers of photos and videos, none of which are properly organized and shared. A Boston-based startup called Lineage Labs, launching today and backed by $4 million in seed funding, is working on a solution. It’s introducing a product called “Bevy,”… Read More

WeTransfer, Funky Dutch Cousin Of Dropbox And Box, Gets $25M To Go Large In The U.S.

Screen Shot 2015-02-17 at 08.41.43 WeTransfer, the Dutch cloud-based web and mobile service that lets users send files to each other that are too large to send as email attachments, has raised $25 million, the first and only round of funding raised by the Amsterdam-based startup since first opening for business in 2009. As a bootstrapped company, WeTransfer has picked up 25 million monthly active users that send 70… Read More