Microwave Tech Could Produce 40TB Hard Drives In the Near Future

Western Digital has announced a potential game changer that promises to expand the limits of traditional HDDs to up to 40TBs using a microwave-based write head, and the company says it will be able to the public in 2019. Gizmodo reports: Western Digita…

Western Digital has announced a potential game changer that promises to expand the limits of traditional HDDs to up to 40TBs using a microwave-based write head, and the company says it will be able to the public in 2019. Gizmodo reports: Western Digital’s new approach, microwave-assisted magnetic recording (MAMR), can utilize the company’s existing production chain to cram a lot more storage onto a 3.5-inch disk. In a technical overview, Western Digital says it has managed to overcome the biggest issue with traditional HDD drive storage — the size of the write head. These days, an average hard drive maxes out in the 10-14TB range. But by integrating a new write head, “a spin torque oscillator,” microwaves can create the energy levels necessary for copying data within a lower magnetic field than was ever previously possible. There’s a more thorough white paper for those who want to dive in. According to Western Digital, MAMR has “the capability to extend areal density gains up to 4 Terabits per square inch.” By the year 2025, it hopes to be packing 40TBs into the same size drive it offers today.

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Researcher Turns HDD Into Rudimentary Microphone

An anonymous reader writes from Bleeping Computer: Speaking at a security conference, researcher Alfredo Ortega has revealed that you can use your hard disk drive (HDD) as a rudimentary microphone to pick up nearby sounds. This is possible because of h…

An anonymous reader writes from Bleeping Computer: Speaking at a security conference, researcher Alfredo Ortega has revealed that you can use your hard disk drive (HDD) as a rudimentary microphone to pick up nearby sounds. This is possible because of how hard drives are designed to work. Sounds or nearby vibrations are nothing more than mechanical waves that cause HDD platters to vibrate. By design, a hard drive cannot read or write information to an HDD platter that moves under vibrations, so the hard drive must wait for the oscillation to stop before carrying out any actions. Because modern operating systems come with utilities that measure HDD operations up to nanosecond accuracy, Ortega realized that he could use these tools to measure delays in HDD operations. The longer the delay, the louder the sound or the intense the vibration that causes it. These read-write delays allowed the researcher to reconstruct sound or vibration waves picked up by the HDD platters. A video demo is here. “It’s not accurate yet to pick up conversations,” Ortega told Bleeping Computer in a private conversation. “However, there is research that can recover voice data from very low-quality signals using pattern recognition. I didn’t have time to replicate the pattern-recognition portion of that research into mine. However, it’s certainly applicable.” Furthermore, the researcher also used sound to attack hard drives. Ortega played a 130Hz tone to make an HDD stop responding to commands. “The Linux kernel disconnected it entirely after 120 seconds,” he said. There’s a video of this demo on YouTube.

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High Sierra’s Disk Utility Does Not Recognize Unformatted Disks

macOS 10.13’s Disk Utility 17.0 (1626) does not recognize raw drives, reads a blog post, shared by several readers. From the post: Diskutil does recognize the drive. We’ll use it to perform a quick, cursory format (e.g., diskutil eraseDisk JHFS+ NewDis…

macOS 10.13’s Disk Utility 17.0 (1626) does not recognize raw drives, reads a blog post, shared by several readers. From the post: Diskutil does recognize the drive. We’ll use it to perform a quick, cursory format (e.g., diskutil eraseDisk JHFS+ NewDisk GPT disk0) to make the disk appear in Disk Utility, where further modifications can more easily be made. Plugging in an unformatted external drive produces the usual alert, “The disk you inserted was not readable by this computer. Initialize… | Ignore | Eject”, but clicking Initialize just opens Disk Utility without the disk appearing. There’s an option in Disk Utility to view “all devices,” but clicking that doesn’t show raw disks, the blog post adds.

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Russia Threatens To Shut Down Facebook Over Local Data Storage Laws

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: Facebook Inc. will be shut down in Russia next year if it fails to comply with requirements to store user data locally, according to the head of Russia’s state communications watchdog. “The law is man…

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: Facebook Inc. will be shut down in Russia next year if it fails to comply with requirements to store user data locally, according to the head of Russia’s state communications watchdog. “The law is mandatory for everyone,” Alexander Zharov told reporters Tuesday. Roskomnadzor will be forcing foreign internet companies to comply or shut down in the country. President Vladimir Putin signed a law in 2014 that requires global internet firms to store personal data of Russian clients on local servers. Companies ranging from Alphabet Inc.’s Google to Alibaba Group Holding Ltd complied, while others like Twitter Inc. demanded extra time to evaluate the economic feasibility of doing so.

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Google, Bing, Yahoo Data Retention Doesn’t Improve Search Quality, Study Claims

A new paper released on Monday via the National Bureau of Economic Research claims that retaining search log data doesn’t do much for search quality. “Data retention has implications in the debate over Europe’s right to be forgotten, the authors sugges…

A new paper released on Monday via the National Bureau of Economic Research claims that retaining search log data doesn’t do much for search quality. “Data retention has implications in the debate over Europe’s right to be forgotten, the authors suggest, because retained data undermines that right,” reports The Register. “It’s also relevant to U.S. policy discussions about privacy regulations.” From the report: To determine whether retention policies affected the accuracy of search results, Chiou and Tucker used data from metrics biz Hitwise to assess web traffic being driven by search sites. They looked at Microsoft Bing and Yahoo! Search during a period when Bing changed its search data retention period from 18 months to 6 months and when Yahoo! changed its retention period from 13 months to 3 months, as well as when Yahoo! had second thoughts and shifted to an 18-month retention period. According to Chiou and Tucker, data retention periods didn’t affect the flow of traffic from search engines to downstream websites. “Our findings suggest that long periods of data storage do not confer advantages in search quality, which is an often-cited benefit of data retention by companies,” their paper states. Chiou and Tucker observe that the supposed cost of privacy laws to consumers and to companies may be lower than perceived. They also contend that their findings weaken the claim that data retention affects search market dominance, which could make data retention less relevant in antitrust discussions of Google.

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Apple File System in macOS High Sierra Won’t Work With Fusion Drives

An anonymous reader shares a report: MacOS High Sierra will come out of beta and roll out to the public next week. If you have previously installed the beta version, you may need to take extra steps before installing the release so your Fusion Drive-to…

An anonymous reader shares a report: MacOS High Sierra will come out of beta and roll out to the public next week. If you have previously installed the beta version, you may need to take extra steps before installing the release so your Fusion Drive-toting machine doesn’t experience any negative consequences. Apple announced that the new Apple File system (APFS) won’t immediately support Fusion Drives and will only support systems with all-flash built-in storage in the initial release of High Sierra. Those who tested out the beta versions of macOS High Sierra had their Fusion Drives converted to the new APFS. However, support was removed from the most recent beta versions, and it isn’t coming back with the public release of High Sierra. Apple provided a set of instructions to help those users convert their Fusion Drives back from APFS to the standard HFS+ format before installing the High Sierra update. The instructions include backing up data using Time Machine, creating a bootable installer, reformatting the machine using Disk Utility, and reinstalling the operating system update.

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SanDisk Breaks Storage Record With 400GB MicroSD Card

SanDisk has managed to cram 400GB into a microSD card, making it the largest microSD card currently on the market. The company said the capacity breakthrough was the result of Western Digital, the company that owns SanDisk, “leveraging its proprietary …

SanDisk has managed to cram 400GB into a microSD card, making it the largest microSD card currently on the market. The company said the capacity breakthrough was the result of Western Digital, the company that owns SanDisk, “leveraging its proprietary memory technology and design and production processes that allow for more bits per die.” The nitty-gritty details weren’t revealed beyond that. ExtremeTech reports: The speed appears to come with a tradeoff. SanDisk trumpets its A1 speed rating, saying: “Rated A1, the SanDisk Ultra microSD card is optimized for apps, delivering faster app launch and performance that provides a better smartphone experience.” This is a generous reading of the A1’s target performance specification. Last year, the SD Association released a report discussing the App Performance Class memory card specification and why the spec was created in the first place. When Android added support for running applications from an SD card, there was a need to make certain the cards people bought would be quick enough to run apps in the first place. The A1 is rated for 1500 read and 500 write IOPS, with a sequential transfer speed of 10MB/s. This SanDisk drive should run applications just fine. SanDisk claims it can be used for recording video, not just storing it. But it’s not going to be fast enough for 4K data; Class 10 devices are limited to 10MB/s of sequential write performance. Obviously not all phones support shooting in 4K anyway, so whether this is a limitation will depend on what device you plan to plug it into. The 100MB/s speed trumpeted by Western Digital is a reference to read speeds; write speeds are lower and likely closer to the 10MB/s sequential target mentioned above. The microSD card is expected to retail for $250.

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APFS Is Not Optional

From a new Apple knowledge base article: When you upgrade to macOS High Sierra, systems with all flash storage configurations are converted automatically. Systems with hard disk drives (HDD) and Fusion drives won’t be converted to APFS. You can’t opt-o…

From a new Apple knowledge base article: When you upgrade to macOS High Sierra, systems with all flash storage configurations are converted automatically. Systems with hard disk drives (HDD) and Fusion drives won’t be converted to APFS. You can’t opt-out of the transition to APFS.

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BackBlaze’s Hard Drive Stats for Q2 2017

BackBlaze is back with its new hard drive reliability report: Since our last report for Q1 2017, we have added 635 additional hard drives to bring us to the 83,151 drives we’ll focus on. We’ll begin our review by looking at the statistics for the perio…

BackBlaze is back with its new hard drive reliability report: Since our last report for Q1 2017, we have added 635 additional hard drives to bring us to the 83,151 drives we’ll focus on. We’ll begin our review by looking at the statistics for the period of April 1, 2017 through June 30, 2017 (Q2 2017). […] When looking at the quarterly numbers, remember to look for those drives with at least 50,000 drive hours for the quarter. That works out to about 550 drives running the entire quarter. That’s a good sample size. If the sample size is below that, the failure rates can be skewed based on a small change in the number of drive failures. Editor’s note: In short: hard drives from HGST, a subsidiary of Western Digital, and Toshiba were far more reliable than those from Seagate across the models BackBlaze uses in its datacenters.

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A User Archived Nearly 2 Million Gigabytes of Porn to Test Amazon’s ‘Unlimited’ Cloud Storage

An anonymous reader shares a report: Reddit user beaston02 was determined to find the true ceiling of Amazon’s cloud storage plan, which was killed off in June. He decided to push its limits with a petabyte of porn. For reference, a petabyte is one mil…

An anonymous reader shares a report: Reddit user beaston02 was determined to find the true ceiling of Amazon’s cloud storage plan, which was killed off in June. He decided to push its limits with a petabyte of porn. For reference, a petabyte is one million gigabytes. “It is nearly entirely porn,” he told me in a Reddit message. “Ever since I got into computers, I found myself learning more, and faster when it was something more interesting. Call me crazy, but women interest me more than most other things on the internet and there is a huge amount of data being created daily, so it was a good fit for the project.” He said it took five or six months to collect one petabyte of porn, and he stopped collecting just shy of 1.8 petabytes. How long would it take one to consume 1.8 petabytes of porn? 1.8 petabytes is about 23.4 years of HD-TV video, but webcam streams are nowhere near that quality. A few good folks crunched the numbers: 720p is about two gigabytes per hour, and at 900,000 hours, that’s 102 years of straight calendar time. If the videos are even lower quality, say, 480p, that’s around 0.7 gigabytes per hour, or 293 years and six months.

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