Space Photos of the Week: These Galaxy Clusters Are, Like, Crazy Mysterious

Space Photos of the Week: These Galaxy Clusters Are, Like, Crazy Mysterious

Space photos of the week, April 24–30, 2016. The post Space Photos of the Week: These Galaxy Clusters Are, Like, Crazy Mysterious appeared first on WIRED.

Space Photos of the Week: These Galaxy Clusters Are, Like, Crazy Mysterious

Space photos of the week, April 24–30, 2016. The post Space Photos of the Week: These Galaxy Clusters Are, Like, Crazy Mysterious appeared first on WIRED.

Take a Digital Magnifying Glass to an Epic New Map of Pluto

This new global map is blurry in spots, but that’s because it includes every single image that New Horizons took between July 7 and 14. The post Take a Digital Magnifying Glass to an Epic New Map of Pluto appeared first on WIRED.

Take a Digital Magnifying Glass to an Epic New Map of Pluto

This new global map is blurry in spots, but that’s because it includes every single image that New Horizons took between July 7 and 14. The post Take a Digital Magnifying Glass to an Epic New Map of Pluto appeared first on WIRED.

SpaceX’s Plan to Reach Mars by 2018 Is … Actually Not That Crazy

SpaceX is already pretty close to having a lot of the tech they need for an uncrewed mission to Mars. The hardest part will be landing a craft on the big, red rock. The post SpaceX’s Plan to Reach Mars by 2018 Is … Actually Not That Crazy appeared fi…

SpaceX’s Plan to Reach Mars by 2018 Is … Actually Not That Crazy

SpaceX is already pretty close to having a lot of the tech they need for an uncrewed mission to Mars. The hardest part will be landing a craft on the big, red rock. The post SpaceX’s Plan to Reach Mars by 2018 Is … Actually Not That Crazy appeared first on WIRED.

SpaceX Intends To Send a Red Dragon To Mars As Early As 2018

Reader MarkWhittington writes: SpaceX has announced that it intends to send a version of its Dragon spacecraft, called “Red Dragon,” to Mars as early as 2018. The mission, to be launched on top of a Falcon Heavy rocket, would be the first to another pl…

Reader MarkWhittington writes: SpaceX has announced that it intends to send a version of its Dragon spacecraft, called “Red Dragon,” to Mars as early as 2018. The mission, to be launched on top of a Falcon Heavy rocket, would be the first to another planet conducted by a commercial enterprise. The flight of the Red Dragon would be the beginning of SpaceX CEO Elon Musk’s long-term dream of building a settlement on Mars.Ars Technica reports: According to the company, these initial test missions will help demonstrate the technologies needed to land large payloads propulsively on Mars. This series of missions, to be launched on the company’s not-yet-completed Falcon Heavy rocket, will provide key data for SpaceX as the company develops an overall plan to send humans to the Red Planet to colonize Mars. One of the biggest challenges in landing on Mars is the fact that its atmosphere is so thin it provides little braking capacity. To land the 900kg Curiosity rover on Mars, NASA had to devise the complicated sky crane system that led to its “Seven Minutes of Terror.” A Dragon would weigh much more, perhaps about 6,000kg. To solve this problem, SpaceX plans to use an upgraded spacecraft, a Dragon2 powered by eight SuperDraco engines, to land using propulsion.

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Pluto’s Dwarf Planet Friend Makemake Has a Cute Little Moon

The Hubble telescope snapped a picture of the undiscovered satellite, which could really shake up what we know about icy dwarf planets. The post Pluto’s Dwarf Planet Friend Makemake Has a Cute Little Moon appeared first on WIRED.

Pluto’s Dwarf Planet Friend Makemake Has a Cute Little Moon

The Hubble telescope snapped a picture of the undiscovered satellite, which could really shake up what we know about icy dwarf planets. The post Pluto’s Dwarf Planet Friend Makemake Has a Cute Little Moon appeared first on WIRED.

Stephen Hawking Suggests Black Holes Are Possible Portals To Another Universe

An anonymous reader shares an article on Science World Report: Stephen Hawking, in a recent lecture held at the Harvard University, claimed that black holes could be portals to a parallel universe. The celebrated physicist spoke at length about black h…

An anonymous reader shares an article on Science World Report: Stephen Hawking, in a recent lecture held at the Harvard University, claimed that black holes could be portals to a parallel universe. The celebrated physicist spoke at length about black holes and suggested that they neither store materials absorbed by them nor physical information about the object that created them. Known as the information paradox, the theory goes against the scientific rule that information on a system belonging to a particular time can be used to understand its state at a different time. Over the years, it has been speculated that black holes do not retain information about the stars from which they are formed, except storing their electrical charge, angular momentum and mass. According to Hawking, as per that theory, it was believed that identical black holes might be formed by an infinite quantity of matter configurations. However, quantum mechanics has signaled the opposite by revealing that black holes could only be formed by particles with explicit wavelengths. If the characteristics of the bodies that create black holes are not deprived, then they include a lot of information that is not revealed to the outside world, according to the physicist. “For more than 200 years, we have believed in the science of determinism, that is that the laws of science determine the evolution of the universe” Stephen Hawking said. If information was lost in black holes, we wouldn’t be able to predict the future because the black hole could emit any collection of particles.”This is in contrast to some of Hawking’s earlier views. In 2014, for instance, Hawking suggested that black holes don’t exist, at least not like we think.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Stephen Hawking Suggests Black Holes Are Possible Portals To Another Universe

An anonymous reader shares an article on Science World Report: Stephen Hawking, in a recent lecture held at the Harvard University, claimed that black holes could be portals to a parallel universe. The celebrated physicist spoke at length about black h…

An anonymous reader shares an article on Science World Report: Stephen Hawking, in a recent lecture held at the Harvard University, claimed that black holes could be portals to a parallel universe. The celebrated physicist spoke at length about black holes and suggested that they neither store materials absorbed by them nor physical information about the object that created them. Known as the information paradox, the theory goes against the scientific rule that information on a system belonging to a particular time can be used to understand its state at a different time. Over the years, it has been speculated that black holes do not retain information about the stars from which they are formed, except storing their electrical charge, angular momentum and mass. According to Hawking, as per that theory, it was believed that identical black holes might be formed by an infinite quantity of matter configurations. However, quantum mechanics has signaled the opposite by revealing that black holes could only be formed by particles with explicit wavelengths. If the characteristics of the bodies that create black holes are not deprived, then they include a lot of information that is not revealed to the outside world, according to the physicist. “For more than 200 years, we have believed in the science of determinism, that is that the laws of science determine the evolution of the universe” Stephen Hawking said. If information was lost in black holes, we wouldn’t be able to predict the future because the black hole could emit any collection of particles.”This is in contrast to some of Hawking’s earlier views. In 2014, for instance, Hawking suggested that black holes don’t exist, at least not like we think.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

ESA Offering Prizes For First Radio Reception From Satellite

An anonymous reader writes: The European Space Agency education office set up a contest to receive the radio signals from their new Cubesat satellites: AAUSAT4, E-st@r-II or OUFTI-1. Prizes will be rewarded to those who receive the first signal (audio …

An anonymous reader writes: The European Space Agency education office set up a contest to receive the radio signals from their new Cubesat satellites: AAUSAT4, E-st@r-II or OUFTI-1. Prizes will be rewarded to those who receive the first signal (audio or waterfall) from TLM, packet or ham radio transponders. Even if you’re not the first, any valid submission will be rewarded with a nice QSL card from ESA, reports one space site. Arianespace’s Soyuz is scheduled for liftoff on April 24 with a multi-mission satellite payload. Designated Flight VS14 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system, the medium-lift Soyuz carries a mixed payload of the Sentinel-1B C-band radar observation platform, a trio of “Fly Your Satellite!” technology demonstrator CubeSats, and the Microscope scientific satellite.

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A NASA Man Faces the Isolation of Space Without Ever Leaving Earth

Jason Labay’s life had every condition of a space voyage. Except he wasn’t going anywhere. The post A NASA Man Faces the Isolation of Space Without Ever Leaving Earth appeared first on WIRED.

A NASA Man Faces the Isolation of Space Without Ever Leaving Earth

Jason Labay’s life had every condition of a space voyage. Except he wasn’t going anywhere. The post A NASA Man Faces the Isolation of Space Without Ever Leaving Earth appeared first on WIRED.

Wikipedia May Get Delivered To The Moon

A new Meta page on Wikimedia.org reports: “A group of science enthusiasts from Berlin, Germany, are planning to send their own custom-built rover to the Moon. And they want to take Wikipedia with them.”
Sort of. Wikimedia Deutschland has been offered s…

A new Meta page on Wikimedia.org reports: “A group of science enthusiasts from Berlin, Germany, are planning to send their own custom-built rover to the Moon. And they want to take Wikipedia with them.”
Sort of. Wikimedia Deutschland has been offered space on a data disc to be carried by one of the five image-gathering rovers still competing to land on the Moon by 2017 for the Google Lunar XPRIZE challenge. But there’s only 20 gigabytes of space, so they’re calling on the Wikipedia communities to agree on which content should be included by June 24. “Even if only a snapshot of Wikipedia can be brought to the Moon, its content will equal a genuine snapshot of the sum of all human knowledge…” the Meta page explains “This is an anniversary gift to all Wikipedia communities all over the world.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.