Are Your Slack Conversations Really Private and Secure?

An anonymous reader writes:
“Chats that seem to be more ephemeral than email are still being recorded on a server somewhere,” reports Fast Company, noting that Slack’s Data Request Policy says the company will turn over data from customers when “it is …

An anonymous reader writes:
“Chats that seem to be more ephemeral than email are still being recorded on a server somewhere,” reports Fast Company, noting that Slack’s Data Request Policy says the company will turn over data from customers when “it is compelled by law to do so or is subject to a valid and binding order of a governmental or regulatory body…or in cases of emergency to avoid death or physical harm to individuals.” Slack will notify customers before disclosure “unless Slack is prohibited from doing so,” or if the data is associated with “illegal conduct or risk of harm to people or property.”

The article also warns that like HipChat and Campfire, Slack “is encrypted only at rest and in transit,” though a Slack spokesperson says they “may evaluate” end-to-end encryption at some point in the future. Slack has no plans to offer local hosting of Slack data, but if employers pay for a Plus Plan, they’re able to access private conversations.

Though Slack has 4 million users, the article points out that there’s other alternatives like Semaphor and open source choices like Wickr and Mattermost. I’d be curious to hear what Slashdot readers are using at their own workplaces — and how they feel about the privacy and security of Slack?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Are Your Slack Conversations Really Private and Secure?

An anonymous reader writes:
“Chats that seem to be more ephemeral than email are still being recorded on a server somewhere,” reports Fast Company, noting that Slack’s Data Request Policy says the company will turn over data from customers when “it is …

An anonymous reader writes:
“Chats that seem to be more ephemeral than email are still being recorded on a server somewhere,” reports Fast Company, noting that Slack’s Data Request Policy says the company will turn over data from customers when “it is compelled by law to do so or is subject to a valid and binding order of a governmental or regulatory body…or in cases of emergency to avoid death or physical harm to individuals.” Slack will notify customers before disclosure “unless Slack is prohibited from doing so,” or if the data is associated with “illegal conduct or risk of harm to people or property.”

The article also warns that like HipChat and Campfire, Slack “is encrypted only at rest and in transit,” though a Slack spokesperson says they “may evaluate” end-to-end encryption at some point in the future. Slack has no plans to offer local hosting of Slack data, but if employers pay for a Plus Plan, they’re able to access private conversations.

Though Slack has 4 million users, the article points out that there’s other alternatives like Semaphor and open source choices like Wickr and Mattermost. I’d be curious to hear what Slashdot readers are using at their own workplaces — and how they feel about the privacy and security of Slack?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Social Media Are Driving Americans Insane

Deena Shanker, writing for Bloomberg: If you pull out your phone to check Twitter while waiting for the light to change, or read e-mails while brushing your teeth, you might be what the American Psychological Association calls a “constant checker.” And…

Deena Shanker, writing for Bloomberg: If you pull out your phone to check Twitter while waiting for the light to change, or read e-mails while brushing your teeth, you might be what the American Psychological Association calls a “constant checker.” And chances are, it’s hurting your mental health. Last week, the APA released a study finding that Americans were experiencing the first statistically significant stress increase in the survey’s 10-year history. In January, 57 percent of respondents of all political stripes said the U.S. political climate was a very or somewhat significant source of stress, up from 52 percent who said the same thing in August. On Thursday, the APA released the second part of its 1 findings, “Stress In America: Coping With Change,” examining the role technology and social media play in American stress levels. […] The highest stress levels, it should be noted, are reserved for those who constantly check their work e-mail on days off. Their average stress level is 6.0. So those of you who think it’s somehow pleasant to work from home on a Saturday afternoon, you’re actually fooling yourself.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ask Slashdot: How Do You Deal With Aggressive Forum Users?

Slashdot reader dryriver writes:

I’ve noticed a disturbing trend while trying to resolve a rather tricky tech issue by asking questions on a number of internet forums. The number of people who don’t help at all with problems but rather butt into thre…

Slashdot reader dryriver writes:

I’ve noticed a disturbing trend while trying to resolve a rather tricky tech issue by asking questions on a number of internet forums. The number of people who don’t help at all with problems but rather butt into threads with unhelpful comments like “Why would you want to do that in the first place?” or “why don’t you look at X poorly written documentation page ” was staggering. One forum user with 1,500+ posts even posted “you are such a n00b if you can’t figure this out” in my question thread, even though my tech question wasn’t one that is obvious or easy to resolve…

I seem to remember a time when people helped each other far more readily on the internet. Now there seems to be a new breed of forum user who a) hangs out at a forum socially all day b) does not bother to help at all and c) gets a kick out of telling you things like “what a stupid question” or “nobody will help you with that here” or similar… Where have the good old days gone when people much more readily gave other people step-by-step tips, tricks, instructions and advice?

The original submission claims the ratio of unhelpful comments to helpful ones was 5 to 1. Has anyone else experienced this? And if so, what’s the best response? Leave your best answers in the comments. How do you deal with aggressive forum users?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Kaspersky Lab Promises New Backup Tool To Help Unhappy Social Media Users Quit

Kaspersky Lab surveyed 16,750 people and concluded that often negative experiences on social experience overpower their positive effects — and they’re doing something about it. JustAnotherOldGuy pointed us to their latest announcement.
59% have felt …

Kaspersky Lab surveyed 16,750 people and concluded that often negative experiences on social experience overpower their positive effects — and they’re doing something about it. JustAnotherOldGuy pointed us to their latest announcement.
59% have felt unhappy when they have seen friends’ posts from a party they were not invited to, and 45% revealed that their friends’ happy holiday pictures have had a negative influence on them. Furthermore, 37% also admitted that looking at past happy posts of their own can leave them with the feeling that their own past was better than their present life. Previous research has also demonstrated peoples’ frustration with social media as 78% admitted that they have considered leaving social networks altogether. The only thing that makes people stay on social media is the fear of losing their digital memories, such as photos, and contacts with their friends.

To help people decide more freely if they want to stay in social media or leave without losing their digital memories, Kaspersky Lab is developing a new app — FFForget will allow people to back up all of their memories from the social networks they use and keep them in a safe, encrypted memory container and will give people the freedom to leave any network whenever they want, without losing what belongs to them — their digital lives.
The FFForget app will be released in 2017, but there’s already a web page where you can sign up for early access. Kaspersky plans to monetize this by creating both a free version of the app — limited to one social network — and a $1.99-per-month version which automatically backs up social content from Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Instagram in real-time with a fancier interface and more powerful encryption.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

US Judge Rejects Suit Over Face Scanning for Video Game

Two athletes whose images were scanned for a video game have been bounced from court on their claim that the game maker violated a law protecting biometric information. From a report: Brother-and-sister video basketball players Ricardo and Vanessa Vigi…

Two athletes whose images were scanned for a video game have been bounced from court on their claim that the game maker violated a law protecting biometric information. From a report: Brother-and-sister video basketball players Ricardo and Vanessa Vigil were leading a class action that claimed Take-Two Interactive, which manufactured the NBA 2K15 game, ran afoul of an Illinois law that governs biometric identifiers such as retina or iris scans, fingerprints, voiceprints, or scans of hand and face geometry. The Vigils agreed to have their faces scanned to create digital avatars for NBA 2K15, but said they didn’t know their images would be available in unencrypted form online. They tried to hold Take-Two liable under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) in Vigil v. Take-Two Interactive Software, 15-cv-8211. Judge John Koetl of the Southern District of New York dismissed the proposed class action suit filed by brother and sister Ricardo and Vanessa Vigil, saying the plaintiffs didn’t show “concrete” harm from the way the gaming company stores and uses their biometric data.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Once Mocked, Facebook’s $1 Billion Acquisition of Instagram Was Genius

anderzole writes: “In April of 2012, Facebook shocked the tech world when it acquired Instagram for $1 billion,” reports BGR. “At the time, the acquisition raised quite a few eyebrows, along with many more questions than answers. Not only did people wo…

anderzole writes: “In April of 2012, Facebook shocked the tech world when it acquired Instagram for $1 billion,” reports BGR. “At the time, the acquisition raised quite a few eyebrows, along with many more questions than answers. Not only did people wonder how Instagram would fit into Facebook’s existing business, many also questioned if Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had lost his mind by outlaying $1 billion for a company that, at the time, had no revenue.” Nearly five years later, Facebook’s Instagram acquisition
“not only looks like a bargain, but a full-fledged stroke of genius.” Today Instagram still shows no signs of slowing down. Instagram’s active user base jumped from 500 to 600 million in just the last 6 months alone, marking its fastest growth rate ever. “Incredibly, Facebook saw the long-term potential and impact of Instagram and managed to swoop in and acquire the company long before its user base began to accelerate wildly,” writes BGR. “From an economic standpoint, Instagram is already paying dividends via highly targeted and lucrative ads. During the first quarter of 2016, for example, it was estimated that revenue from Instagram checked in at $572.5 million and accounted for 10% of Facebook’s overall revenue. In fact, analysts at Credit Suisse believe that Instagram will have delivered $3.2 billion in revenue for Facebook by the time 2016 comes to a close. That’s not bad for a $1 billion acquisition that Facebook is still in the relatively early stages of monetizing.”
Instagram was also the second-fastest growing app of 2016, increasing its user base by 36% in just 12 months.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Once Mocked, Facebook’s $1 Billion Acquisition of Instagram Was Genius

anderzole writes: “In April of 2012, Facebook shocked the tech world when it acquired Instagram for $1 billion,” reports BGR. “At the time, the acquisition raised quite a few eyebrows, along with many more questions than answers. Not only did people wo…

anderzole writes: “In April of 2012, Facebook shocked the tech world when it acquired Instagram for $1 billion,” reports BGR. “At the time, the acquisition raised quite a few eyebrows, along with many more questions than answers. Not only did people wonder how Instagram would fit into Facebook’s existing business, many also questioned if Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had lost his mind by outlaying $1 billion for a company that, at the time, had no revenue.” Nearly five years later, Facebook’s Instagram acquisition
“not only looks like a bargain, but a full-fledged stroke of genius.” Today Instagram still shows no signs of slowing down. Instagram’s active user base jumped from 500 to 600 million in just the last 6 months alone, marking its fastest growth rate ever. “Incredibly, Facebook saw the long-term potential and impact of Instagram and managed to swoop in and acquire the company long before its user base began to accelerate wildly,” writes BGR. “From an economic standpoint, Instagram is already paying dividends via highly targeted and lucrative ads. During the first quarter of 2016, for example, it was estimated that revenue from Instagram checked in at $572.5 million and accounted for 10% of Facebook’s overall revenue. In fact, analysts at Credit Suisse believe that Instagram will have delivered $3.2 billion in revenue for Facebook by the time 2016 comes to a close. That’s not bad for a $1 billion acquisition that Facebook is still in the relatively early stages of monetizing.”
Instagram was also the second-fastest growing app of 2016, increasing its user base by 36% in just 12 months.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Seattle Man Accused of Using Social Media To Set Up Fake Porn Agency

The Washington State Attorney General’s Office has charged a Seattle man for setting up a fake talent agency for adult entertainers in order to trick women into posing nude and having sex with him. NBC News reports: Michael-Jon Matthew Hickey is accuse…

The Washington State Attorney General’s Office has charged a Seattle man for setting up a fake talent agency for adult entertainers in order to trick women into posing nude and having sex with him. NBC News reports: Michael-Jon Matthew Hickey is accused of creating a fictitious business and using deceptive ads with bogus employment offers to find his victims. The lawsuit alleges Hickey offered and advertised commercial services solely for his “own personal gain” and to “satisfy his sexual desires” with no intention of following through on the promised services to help these women find jobs. Hickey, a 40-year old technology blogger and aspiring photographer, is charged with numerous violations of the Washington Consumer Protection Act and the Commercial Electronic Mail Act. Assistant Attorney General Andrea Alegrett, who is handling the consumer protection case, told NBC News Hickey had developed “a sophisticated scam” which involved fake business websites, fictional people, and bogus contact information. The lawsuit alleges Hickey pretended to be a woman named Deja Stwalley, who claimed to live in Las Vegas where she ran a number of talent companies, including New Seattle Talent, West Coast Talent and FMH Modeling. The New SeattleTalent website stated: “We work as recruiters and scouts for some of the top studios in the Northwest. Our goal is to be the top recruiting group for girls in America. We’re woman-founded and woman-owned, and take the talent’s safety and welfare seriously.” Hickey, posing as Stwalley, would contact women between the ages of 17 and 25 via Facebook and offer them a chance to audition for an adult film studio. Stwalley assured each woman that they “TOTALLY have the look they’re going for” and could earn between $1,200 and $3,500 a day, the AG’s complaint alleges. Digital Security expert Adam Levin, Chairman and founder of Identity Theft 911, said this case shows just how easy it is for someone to use social media for fraudulent purposes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Jack Dorsey Says Twitter Needs An Edit Function

Twitter is considering an edit function for tweets. In a seemingly impromptu chat on his platform Thursday, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey gave hope to those who have long advocated for the feature, telling one user that “a form of edit is def needed” and ano…

Twitter is considering an edit function for tweets. In a seemingly impromptu chat on his platform Thursday, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey gave hope to those who have long advocated for the feature, telling one user that “a form of edit is def needed” and another that an edit function is something the company is “thinking a lot about.” From a report: The demand for an edit button has become something of a meme on Twitter. After seemingly every new Twitter product announcement, many of the platform’s users respond with some form of “Yes, but still no edit button?” Meanwhile the feature has become standard in competing platforms such as Facebook and Instagram.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.