VR Devs Pull Support For Oculus Rift Until Palmer Luckey Steps Down

After it was revealed that Oculus founder Palmer Luckey backed a pro-Trump political organization called Nimble America that is dedicated to “shitposting” and spreading inflammatory memes about Hillary Clinton, several developers of the Oculus Rift vir…

After it was revealed that Oculus founder Palmer Luckey backed a pro-Trump political organization called Nimble America that is dedicated to “shitposting” and spreading inflammatory memes about Hillary Clinton, several developers of the Oculus Rift virtual-reality headset have announced that they will stop supporting the headset until its founder steps down. One of the biggest developers for Oculus Rift, Insomniac Games, told Motherboard, “Insomniac Games condemns all forms of hate speech. While everyone has a right to express his or her political opinion, the behavior and sentiments reported do not reflect the values of our company. We are also confident that his behavior and sentiment does not reflect the values of the many Oculus employees we work with on a daily basis.” Fez and Superhypercube developer Polytron also said in a statement, “In a political climate as fragile and horrifying as this one, we cannot tacitly endorse these actions by supporting Luckey or his platform.” Motherboard reports: Motherboard has reached out to several other, more well-known VR developers who work with Oculus including Fantastic Contraption makers Northway Games and Job Simulator makers Owlchemy Labs. Northway Games couldn’t be reached immediately for comment but tweeted the following: “What. The. Fuck. [accompanied with a link to the news via Kotaku]” and “Definitely using every fibre of my ‘professionalism’ to not tweet some tweets right now.” Owlchemy Labs, which is currently developing for Job Simulator for the Oculus Touch controls, declined to comment either way. E McNeill, who has developed a couple of games for Oculus Rift and GearVR, suggested that like-minded VR developers raise money for Hillary Clinton’s campaign to counter the money Luckey has raised for Trump. [E McNeill tweeted: “Idle Q: Would any Oculus devs join me in a donation drive for HIllary? We could aim to beat Nimble America’s $11k. I’d start with $1k myself.”] “This backlash is nonsense,” said James Green, co-founder of VR developer Carbon Games. “I absolutely support him doing whatever he wants politically if it’s legal. To take any other position is against American values.”

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Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg On ‘Napalm Girl’ Photo: ‘We Don’t Always Get it Right’

Facebook will learn from a mistake it made by deleting a historic Vietnam war photo of a naked girl fleeing a napalm attack, said Sheryl Sandberg, the company’s chief operating officer. The photograph was removed from several accounts on Friday, includ…

Facebook will learn from a mistake it made by deleting a historic Vietnam war photo of a naked girl fleeing a napalm attack, said Sheryl Sandberg, the company’s chief operating officer. The photograph was removed from several accounts on Friday, including that of the Norwegian prime minister, Erna Solberg, on the grounds that it violated Facebook’s restrictions on nudity. It was reinstated after Solberg accused Facebook of censorship and of editing history, The Guardian reports. From the article:”These are difficult decisions and we don’t always get it right,” Sandberg wrote in a letter to the prime minister, obtained by Reuters on Monday under Norway’s freedom of information rules. “Even with clear standards, screening millions of posts on a case-by-case basis every week is challenging,” Sandberg wrote. “Nonetheless, we intend to do better. We are committed to listening to our community and evolving. Thank you for helping us get this right,” she wrote. She said the letter was a sign of “how seriously we take this matter and how we are handling it.”

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Facebook Removes Fake Article About Megyn Kelly From Trending Topics

Less than a week after Facebook announced that it is changing the way it handles the Trending Topics section on the social networking website, a fake article about Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly was found trending on Facebook. The article, headlined “Brea…

Less than a week after Facebook announced that it is changing the way it handles the Trending Topics section on the social networking website, a fake article about Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly was found trending on Facebook. The article, headlined “Breaking: Fox News Exposes Traitor Megyn Kelly, Kicks Her Out for Backing Hillary” comes from a conspiracy theory website, which has more than 200,000 likes on Facebook. Its Megyn Kelly story was the topic of discussion for many across the world. The article is obviously fake. The other cited source for this trending topic was an outlet called “Conservating101”

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‘Social Media ID, Please?’ Proposed US Law Greeted With Anger

The U.S. government announced plans to require some foreign travelers to provide their social media account names when entering the country — and in June requested comments. Now the plan is being called “ludicrous,” an “all-around bad idea,” “blatant …

The U.S. government announced plans to require some foreign travelers to provide their social media account names when entering the country — and in June requested comments. Now the plan is being called “ludicrous,” an “all-around bad idea,” “blatant overreach,” “desperate, paranoid heavy-handedness,” “preposterous,” “appalling,” and “un-American,” reports Slashdot reader dcblogs:
That’s just a sampling of the outrage. Some 800 responded to the U.S. request for comments about a proposed rule affecting people traveling from “visa waiver” countries to the U.S., where a visa is not required. This includes most of Europe, Singapore, Chile, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand… In a little twist of irony, some critics said U.S. President Obama’s proposal for foreign travelers is so bad, it must have been hatched by Donald Trump.

“Travelers will be asked to provide their Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Google+, and whatever other social ID you can imagine to U.S. authorities,” reports Computer World. “It’s technically an ‘optional’ request, but since it’s the government asking, critics believe travelers will fear consequences if they ignore it…”

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‘Social Media ID, Please?’ Proposed US Law Greeted With Anger

The U.S. government announced plans to require some foreign travelers to provide their social media account names when entering the country — and in June requested comments. Now the plan is being called “ludicrous,” an “all-around bad idea,” “blatant …

The U.S. government announced plans to require some foreign travelers to provide their social media account names when entering the country — and in June requested comments. Now the plan is being called “ludicrous,” an “all-around bad idea,” “blatant overreach,” “desperate, paranoid heavy-handedness,” “preposterous,” “appalling,” and “un-American,” reports Slashdot reader dcblogs:
That’s just a sampling of the outrage. Some 800 responded to the U.S. request for comments about a proposed rule affecting people traveling from “visa waiver” countries to the U.S., where a visa is not required. This includes most of Europe, Singapore, Chile, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand… In a little twist of irony, some critics said U.S. President Obama’s proposal for foreign travelers is so bad, it must have been hatched by Donald Trump.

“Travelers will be asked to provide their Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Google+, and whatever other social ID you can imagine to U.S. authorities,” reports Computer World. “It’s technically an ‘optional’ request, but since it’s the government asking, critics believe travelers will fear consequences if they ignore it…”

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Researchers Create Algorithm That Diagnoses Depression From Your Instagram Feed

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Inverse: Harvard University’s Andrew Reece and the University of Vermont’s Chris Danforth crafted an algorithm that can correctly diagnose depression, with up to 70 percent accuracy, based on a patient’s Instagr…

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Inverse: Harvard University’s Andrew Reece and the University of Vermont’s Chris Danforth crafted an algorithm that can correctly diagnose depression, with up to 70 percent accuracy, based on a patient’s Instagram feed alone. After a careful screening process, the team analyzed almost 50,000 photos from 166 participants, all of whom were Instagram users and 71 of whom had already been diagnosed with clinical depression. Their results confirmed their two hypotheses: first, that “markers of depression are observable in Instagram user behavior,” and second, that “these depressive signals are detectable in posts made even before the date of first diagnosis.” The duo had good rationale for both hypotheses. Photos shared on Instagram, despite their innocent appearance, are data-laden: Photos are either taken during the day or at night, in- or outdoors. They may include or exclude people. The user may or may not have used a filter. You can imagine an algorithm drooling at these binary inputs, all of which reflect a person’s preferences, and, in turn, their well-being. Metadata is likewise full of analyzable information: How many people liked the photo? How many commented on it? How often does the user post, and how often do they browse? Many studies have shown that depressed people both perceive less color in the world and prefer dark, anemic scenes and images. The majority of healthy people, on the other hand, prefer colorful things. [Reece and Danforth] collected each photo’s hue, saturation, and value averages. Depressed people, they found, tended to post photos that were more bluish, unsaturated, and dark. “Increased hue, along with decreased brightness and saturation, predicted depression,” they write. The researchers found that happy people post less than depressed people, happy people post photos with more people in them than their depressed counterparts. and that depressed participants were less likely to use filters. The majority of “healthy” participants chose the Valencia filter, while the majority of “depressed” participants chose the Inkwell filter. Inverse has a neat little chart embedded in their report that shows the usage of Instagram filters between depressed and healthy users.

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YouTube Plans To Bring Photos, Polls, and Text To Its Video Service

An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: YouTube is developing a feature internally called Backstage where users can share photos, polls, links, text posts, and videos with their subscribers. Backstage is expected to launch by the end of t…

An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: YouTube is developing a feature internally called Backstage where users can share photos, polls, links, text posts, and videos with their subscribers. Backstage is expected to launch by the end of the year, possibly this fall, on mobile and desktop, initially with select popular YouTube accounts and with limited features, VentureBeat has learned. Akin to a Facebook Timeline or Twitter profile, Backstage will live alongside the Home and Videos tabs within individual YouTube channels. Posts shared to Backstage will appear in reverse chronological order, and, crucially, will also appear in subscribers’ feeds and notifications, making them highly visible to fans. While Backstage is expected to introduce entirely new types of content to YouTube, including tweet-like text posts and topical polls, it also presents new opportunities for video sharing. Backstage will eventually enable users to share both traditional YouTube videos and Backstage-only videos, possibly creating an opportunity for more intimate, or even ephemeral, video sharing between YouTubers and their fans.

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YouTube Plans To Bring Photos, Polls, and Text To Its Video Service

An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: YouTube is developing a feature internally called Backstage where users can share photos, polls, links, text posts, and videos with their subscribers. Backstage is expected to launch by the end of t…

An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: YouTube is developing a feature internally called Backstage where users can share photos, polls, links, text posts, and videos with their subscribers. Backstage is expected to launch by the end of the year, possibly this fall, on mobile and desktop, initially with select popular YouTube accounts and with limited features, VentureBeat has learned. Akin to a Facebook Timeline or Twitter profile, Backstage will live alongside the Home and Videos tabs within individual YouTube channels. Posts shared to Backstage will appear in reverse chronological order, and, crucially, will also appear in subscribers’ feeds and notifications, making them highly visible to fans. While Backstage is expected to introduce entirely new types of content to YouTube, including tweet-like text posts and topical polls, it also presents new opportunities for video sharing. Backstage will eventually enable users to share both traditional YouTube videos and Backstage-only videos, possibly creating an opportunity for more intimate, or even ephemeral, video sharing between YouTubers and their fans.

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Metropolitan Police To Target Online Hate Crime and Abuse

A new team of specialist police officers is being set up to investigate online hate crimes, including abuse on Twitter and Facebook. The London-based hub will include a team of five officers who will support victims and identify online abuse, reports B…

A new team of specialist police officers is being set up to investigate online hate crimes, including abuse on Twitter and Facebook. The London-based hub will include a team of five officers who will support victims and identify online abuse, reports BBC. From the report: The two-year pilot will cost 1.7m pound and has received 452,000 pound from the Home Office, the London Mayor’s office said. A spokesman said there was “no place for hate” in London and there would be a “zero tolerance” of online abuse. The team, which will be set up in the coming months, will identify the location of crimes and allocate them to the appropriate force. They will work with a team of volunteers. The Mayor’s Office for Policing And Crime (Mopac) said social media “provides hate crime perpetrators with a veil of anonymity, making it harder to bring them to justice and potentially impacting on a larger number of people”.

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Zimbabwe Military Threatens To ‘Deal With’ Social Media-Powered Protesters

Things are not looking good in Zimbabwe. Amid tensions between the citizens and longtime president Robert Mugabe, the country’s army commander said today that his soldiers will “deal with threats” from activists using social media to mobilize anti-gove…

Things are not looking good in Zimbabwe. Amid tensions between the citizens and longtime president Robert Mugabe, the country’s army commander said today that his soldiers will “deal with threats” from activists using social media to mobilize anti-government protests, the first time the military has commented on the demonstrations. Reuters reports: Lieutenant-General Valerio Sibanda, the Zimbabwe National Army Commander, said in an interview with state-owned The Herald newspaper that social media activism was cyber warfare that the army would deal with. Neither the army, which has anchored President Robert Mugabe’s 36-year rule, nor the police force have been paid on time since June. Zimbabwe has seen several protests in recent months with unemployment above 80 percent, dollar shortages worsening as commodity prices slumped and as the region suffers its worst drought for 25 years. The largest anti-government protest in Zimbabwe in the last decade was organized on social media last month, when a strike by #ThisFlag movement shut down businesses. “As an army, at our institutions of training, we are already training our officers to be able to deal with this new threat we call cyber warfare where weapons — not necessarily guns but basically information and communication technology — are being used to mobilize people to do the wrong things,” Sibanda said.

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