Elon Musk Teases Reddit With Bad Answers About BFR Rocket

Long-time Slashdot reader Rei writes:
On Saturday evening, Elon Musk took questions in a Reddit AMA (Ask-Me-Anything) concerning SpaceX’s new design for the BFR (Big F* Rocket). But unlike the 2016 IAC conference where many audience questions seemed to…

Long-time Slashdot reader Rei writes:
On Saturday evening, Elon Musk took questions in a Reddit AMA (Ask-Me-Anything) concerning SpaceX’s new design for the BFR (Big F* Rocket). But unlike the 2016 IAC conference where many audience questions seemed to be trolling Musk, this time the tables were turned. Asked why Raptor thrust was reduced from 300 tons to 170, Musk replied, “We chickened out.” He responded to a statement about landing on the moon by quoting Bob the Builder, while responding to a user’s suggestion about caching internet data from Mars by writing simply “Nerd.” A question as to whether BFR autogenous pressurization would be heat-exchanger based, Musk replied that they planned to utilize the Incendio spell from Harry Potter — helpfully providing a Wikipedia link for the spell.
A technical question about the lack of a tail? “Tails are lame.” A question about why the number of landing legs was increased from 3 to 4? “Because 4.” After one Redditor observed “This is one bizarre AMA so far,” Musk replied “Just wait…” While Musk ultimately did follow up some of the trolling with some actual responses, the overall event could be best described as “surreal”.

To be fair, Musk provided some serious answers. (And his final comment ended with “Great questions nk!!”) But one Redditor suggested Musk’s stranger answers were like a threat, along the lines of “Just wait. It will get way more bizarre than that. Let me finish my whiskey.”
Musk replied, “How did you know? I am actually drinking whiskey right now. Really.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

How Facebook Outs Sex Workers

An anonymous reader shares a Gizmodo report: Leila has two identities, but Facebook is only supposed to know about one of them. Leila is a sex worker. She goes to great lengths to keep separate identities for ordinary life and for sex work, to avoid st…

An anonymous reader shares a Gizmodo report: Leila has two identities, but Facebook is only supposed to know about one of them. Leila is a sex worker. She goes to great lengths to keep separate identities for ordinary life and for sex work, to avoid stigma, arrest, professional blowback, or clients who might be stalkers (or worse). Her “real identity” — the public one, who lives in California, uses an academic email address, and posts about politics — joined Facebook in 2011. Her sex-work identity is not on the social network at all; for it, she uses a different email address, a different phone number, and a different name. Yet earlier this year, looking at Facebook’s “People You May Know” recommendations, Leila (a name I’m using in place of either of the names she uses) was shocked to see some of her regular sex-work clients. Despite the fact that she’d only given Facebook information from her vanilla identity, the company had somehow discerned her real-world connection to these people — and, even more horrifyingly, her account was potentially being presented to them as a friend suggestion too, outing her regular identity to them. Because Facebook insists on concealing the methods and data it uses to link one user to another, Leila is not able to find out how the network exposed her or take steps to prevent it from happening again. “We’re living in an age where you can weaponize personal information against people”Kashmir Hill, the reporter who wrote the above story, a few weeks ago shared another similar incident.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook Says 10 Million US Users Saw Russia-linked Ads

Some 10 million people in the United States saw politically divisive ads on Facebook that the company said were purchased in Russia in the months before and after last year’s U.S. presidential election, Facebook said on Monday. From a report: Facebook,…

Some 10 million people in the United States saw politically divisive ads on Facebook that the company said were purchased in Russia in the months before and after last year’s U.S. presidential election, Facebook said on Monday. From a report: Facebook, which had not previously given such an estimate, said in a statement that it used modeling to estimate how many people saw at least one of the 3,000 ads. It also said that 44 percent of the ads were seen before the November 2016 election and 56 percent were seen afterward. The ads have sparked anger toward Facebook and, within the United States, toward Russia since the world’s largest social network disclosed their existence last month. Moscow has denied involvement with the ads.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Rejects Trump Bias Claims

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has dismissed comments made by Donald Trump that the site has always been against him. From a report: The US president accused the social network of “collusion” on Twitter, branding it “anti-Trump”. He made the same cla…

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has dismissed comments made by Donald Trump that the site has always been against him. From a report: The US president accused the social network of “collusion” on Twitter, branding it “anti-Trump”. He made the same claim against the New York Times and the Washington Post. Facebook will shortly hand over 3,000 political adverts to congressional investigators probing alleged Russian meddling in the US election. The site believes the ads were probably purchased by Russian entities during and after the 2016 presidential contest. Facebook, Twitter and Google have been asked to testify before the US Senate Intelligence Committee on 1 November about the allegations of Russian interference. Mark Zuckerberg has made it clear in the past that he doesn’t like Donald Trump — or at least, his policies. “This statement shows frustration, I think. Not just with the president, but at the atmosphere swirling around Facebook at the moment — commentary that is painting it as a burden on the electoral process, and maybe even on society as a whole. He’s trying to show all the good — as he sees it — that Facebook has done.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Instagram Now Has 800 Million Monthly, 500 Million Daily Active Users

An anonymous reader quotes a report from CNBC: Instagram said Monday that it’s added another 100 million monthly users. That brings the photo-sharing app to 800 million monthly active users, up from 700 million in April, according to Carolyn Everson, v…

An anonymous reader quotes a report from CNBC: Instagram said Monday that it’s added another 100 million monthly users. That brings the photo-sharing app to 800 million monthly active users, up from 700 million in April, according to Carolyn Everson, vice president of global marketing solutions at Facebook, who spoke at an Advertising Week event in New York City. Five hundred million of those are daily active users, the company said. That means that Instagram is still ahead of rival Snap in terms of users, based on Snap’s last report. Snap said in August that it had 173 million daily active users. Time spent watching video on Instagram is up more than 80 percent year over year, the company also said on Monday, and four times as many videos are being produced every day on Instagram compared with a year ago.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook Will Share Copies of Political Ads Purchased by Russian Sources With the US Congress

An anonymous reader shares a report: Facebook will turn over copies of political ads purchased by Russian sources to congressional lawmakers, who are investigating the country’s potential interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Initially, …

An anonymous reader shares a report: Facebook will turn over copies of political ads purchased by Russian sources to congressional lawmakers, who are investigating the country’s potential interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Initially, Facebook had only released those ads — 3,000 of them, valued at about $100,000 — to Robert Mueller, the former FBI director who is spearheading the government’s probe into Russia’s actions. Facebook had withheld those details from House and Senate leaders, citing privacy concerns. But the move drew sharp rebukes from the likes of Sen. Mark Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, who has charged in recent days that Facebook may not have done enough to scan its systems for potential Russian influence and to ensure that such foreign purchases — otherwise illegal under U.S. law — don’t happen again. “After an extensive legal and policy review, today we are announcing that we will also share these ads with congressional investigators,” wrote Colin Stretch, the company’s general counsel. “We believe it is vitally important that government authorities have the information they need to deliver to the public a full assessment of what happened in the 2016 election.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

New Book Argues Silicon Valley Will Lead Us to Our Doom

Long-time Slashdot reader Zorro quotes the San Diego Union-Tribune:
To many Americans, large technology firms embody much of what’s good about the modern world. Franklin Foer has a different perspective. In his new book, “World Without Mind,” the veter…

Long-time Slashdot reader Zorro quotes the San Diego Union-Tribune:
To many Americans, large technology firms embody much of what’s good about the modern world. Franklin Foer has a different perspective. In his new book, “World Without Mind,” the veteran journalist lays out a more ominous view of where Big Tech would like to take us — in many ways, already has taken us… These firms have a program: to make the world less private, less individual, less creative, less human… Big Tech has imposed its will on the resident population with neither our input nor our permission.
The reviewer summarizes the book’s argument as “Once hooked, consumers are robbed of choice, milked for profit, deprived of privacy and made the subjects of stealth social engineering experiments.”

Interestingly, Foer was fired from The New Republic in 2014 by its new publisher — Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes — and Foer’s new book includes strong criticism of the way companies are assembling detailed profiles on their users. “They have built their empires by pulverizing privacy; they will further ensconce themselves by pushing boundaries, by taking even more invasive steps that build toward an even more complete portrait of us.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook Shares Details Of Russia-Bought Ads With US Investigators

An anonymous reader quotes CNN:
Special counsel Robert Mueller and his team are now in possession of Russian-linked ads run on Facebook during the presidential election, after they obtained a search warrant for the information. Facebook gave Mueller an…

An anonymous reader quotes CNN:
Special counsel Robert Mueller and his team are now in possession of Russian-linked ads run on Facebook during the presidential election, after they obtained a search warrant for the information. Facebook gave Mueller and his team copies of ads and related information it discovered on its site linked to a Russian troll farm, as well as detailed information about the accounts that bought the ads and the way the ads were targeted at American Facebook users, a source with knowledge of the matter told CNN. The disclosure, first reported by the Wall Street Journal, may give Mueller’s office a fuller picture of who was behind the ad buys and how the ads may have influenced voter sentiment during the 2016 election…

As CNN reported Thursday, Facebook is still not sure whether pro-Kremlin groups may have made other ad buys intended to influence American politics that it simply hasn’t discovered yet. It is even possible that unidentified ad buys may still exist on the social media network today.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

More Millennials Would Give Up Voting Than Texting

An anonymous reader quotes the New York Post:
As the staggering national student loan debt tally sits at an all-time high of $1.33 trillion, according to the Department of Education, many millennials say they would go to extreme lengths to wipe their s…

An anonymous reader quotes the New York Post:
As the staggering national student loan debt tally sits at an all-time high of $1.33 trillion, according to the Department of Education, many millennials say they would go to extreme lengths to wipe their slate clean. According to a new survey from Credible, a personal finance website, 50 percent of all respondents (ages 18-34) said they would give up their right to vote during the next two presidential elections in order to never have to make another loan payment again.
Yet only 44% said they’d be willing to give up Uber and Lyft — and only 13% said they’d be willing to give up texting.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Why It’s So Hard To Trust Facebook

Brian Stelter, writing for CNN: Why won’t Facebook show the public the propagandistic ads that a so-called Russian troll farm bought last year to target American voters? That lack of transparency is troubling to many observers. “Show us the ads Zuck!” …

Brian Stelter, writing for CNN: Why won’t Facebook show the public the propagandistic ads that a so-called Russian troll farm bought last year to target American voters? That lack of transparency is troubling to many observers. “Show us the ads Zuck!” Silicon Valley entrepreneur Jason Calacanis wrote on Twitter when The Washington Post reported on the surreptitious ad buys on Wednesday. Calacanis said Facebook was “profiting off fake news,” echoing a widely held criticism of the social network. It was only the latest example of Facebook’s credibility problem. For a business based on the concept of friendship, it’s proving to be a hard company to trust. On the business side, Facebook’s metrics for advertisers have been error-prone, to say the least. Analysts and reporters have repeatedly uncovered evidence of faulty data and measurement mistakes. Facebook’s opaqueness has also engendered mistrust in the political arena. Conservative activists have accused the company of censoring right-wing voices and stories. Liberal activists have raised alarms about its exploitation of personal information to target ads. And the news business is worried about the spread of bogus stories and hoaxes on the site. Some critics have even taken to calling Facebook a “surveillance company,” seeking to reframe the business the social network is in — not networking but ad targeting based on monitoring of users. Over at The Verge, Casey Newton documents inconsistencies in Facebook’s public remarks over its role in the outcome of the presidential election last year. Newton says Facebook’s shifting Russian ads stories and unwillingness to disclose information citing laws (which seem to imply otherwise) are damaging its credibility.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.