The Average Age For a Child Getting Their First Smartphone Is Now 10.3 Years

An anonymous reader writes: A TechCrunch article, citing a report on Influence Central, states that the average age for a child getting their smartphone is now 10.3 years. The report adds that 64% of kids have access to the Internet via their own lapto…

An anonymous reader writes: A TechCrunch article, citing a report on Influence Central, states that the average age for a child getting their smartphone is now 10.3 years. The report adds that 64% of kids have access to the Internet via their own laptop or tablet, compared to just 42% in 2012. Also, 39% of kids get a social media account at 11.4 years, and 11% get a social media account when they were younger than 10.

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Scientists Crowdfund The Theory of Everything

einar.petersen writes: Danish scientists are seeking to fund their research on the theory of everything in a rather unconventional way, namely via crowdfunding. The two researchers have launched a campaign that as of writing is 55% funded….
“Einstei…

einar.petersen writes: Danish scientists are seeking to fund their research on the theory of everything in a rather unconventional way, namely via crowdfunding. The two researchers have launched a campaign that as of writing is 55% funded….
“Einstein spent the last 30 years of his life searching for an answer to the deepest question about the universe: does a fundamental principle, that governs all of reality, exist…?” reads their Indiegogo page. “In 2013 we, the theoretical physicist Jesper Moller Grimstrup and the mathematician Johannes Aastrup, discovered a simple mathematical principle, which we believe could be exactly what Einstein was searching for.”

One Danish newspaper jokes that the mathematician and theoretical physicist “are now offering mere mortals a chance to get in on the action.”

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Internal Docs Show Human Intervention at Almost Every Stage Of Facebook’s News Operation

More evidence has surfaced to support Gawker’s two recent reports that claimed editors manipulate the trending news and a few other aspects on Facebook. The Guardian, citing leaked documents it obtained, reports that the topics one sees on Facebook are…

More evidence has surfaced to support Gawker’s two recent reports that claimed editors manipulate the trending news and a few other aspects on Facebook. The Guardian, citing leaked documents it obtained, reports that the topics one sees on Facebook are determined on a number of factors including “engagement, timeliness, Pages you’ve liked and your location.” From the report: But the documents show that the company relies heavily on the intervention of a small editorial team to determine what makes its “trending module” headlines — the list of news topics that shows up on the side of the browser window on Facebook’s desktop version. The company backed away from a pure-algorithm approach in 2014 after criticism that it had not included enough coverage of unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, in users’ feeds. The guidelines show human intervention — and therefore editorial decisions — at almost every stage of Facebook’s trending news operation, a team that at one time was as few as 12 people.Sam Biddle of Gawker, wrote: Never trust what a company tells you, on/off record — FB straight up lied to Recode last year. He adds: unless they’re under oath a company like Facebook has every incentive to lie about how it operates. It’s not illegal to lie to a reporter!”

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French Inquiry Launched After Live Suicide Broadcast On Periscope

An anonymous reader writes: French authorities have launched an investigation after a young woman recorded her suicide which streamed live to over 1,000 connected followers on the online video app Periscope. Prosecutors in Egly, Essone, a suburb 15 mil…

An anonymous reader writes: French authorities have launched an investigation after a young woman recorded her suicide which streamed live to over 1,000 connected followers on the online video app Periscope. Prosecutors in Egly, Essone, a suburb 15 miles south of Paris, confirmed they had opened the inquiry following the incident which saw the 19-year-old throw herself under a commuter train at a railway station on Tuesday.BBC reports: Previously, she had filmed herself in her flat discussing how she intended to make a video to “send a message”, warning younger viewers not to continue to watch what would be a “shocking” act, it was reported. During the filming, the young woman claimed to have been raped and named her attacker, according to the reports. It is not the first time that Periscope has been linked to inappropriate content.

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Parents Could Be Sued By Their Kids For Posting Pictures of Them On Facebook

Next time you share pictures of your children on Facebook, you will want to take their permission before doing that. French authorities have warned parents in France of fines of up to $50,000 and a year in prison for publishing intimate photos of their…

Next time you share pictures of your children on Facebook, you will want to take their permission before doing that. French authorities have warned parents in France of fines of up to $50,000 and a year in prison for publishing intimate photos of their children on social media without permission. From a Guardian report: It’s a development that could give pause for thought for many parents used to sharing details of their children’s lives across social media. A 2015 study by internet company Nominet found parents in the UK post nearly 200 photos of their under fives online every year, meaning a child will feature in around 1,000 online photos before their fifth birthday. […] “In a few years, children could easily take their parents to court for publishing photos of them when they were younger,” Eric Delcroix, an expert on internet law and ethics, told Le Figaro. “Children at certain stages do not wish to be photographed or still less for those photos to be made public,” he added.It may seem like an absurd law to many, but think about the potential consequences of putting a kid’s picture on social media. Among others, we’ve seen plenty of pictures becoming meme on the web.

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Parents Could Be Sued By Their Kids For Posting Pictures of Them On Facebook

Next time you share pictures of your children on Facebook, you will want to take their permission before doing that. French authorities have warned parents in France of fines of up to $50,000 and a year in prison for publishing intimate photos of their…

Next time you share pictures of your children on Facebook, you will want to take their permission before doing that. French authorities have warned parents in France of fines of up to $50,000 and a year in prison for publishing intimate photos of their children on social media without permission. From a Guardian report: It’s a development that could give pause for thought for many parents used to sharing details of their children’s lives across social media. A 2015 study by internet company Nominet found parents in the UK post nearly 200 photos of their under fives online every year, meaning a child will feature in around 1,000 online photos before their fifth birthday. […] “In a few years, children could easily take their parents to court for publishing photos of them when they were younger,” Eric Delcroix, an expert on internet law and ethics, told Le Figaro. “Children at certain stages do not wish to be photographed or still less for those photos to be made public,” he added.It may seem like an absurd law to many, but think about the potential consequences of putting a kid’s picture on social media. Among others, we’ve seen plenty of pictures becoming meme on the web.

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Fired Reddit Exec Launches Competing Site

An anonymous reader writes: “Dan McComas, the former second-in-command at Reddit — and vocal critic of its more inflammatory groups — wants to build a better Reddit, one that focuses on ‘healthy, positive communities,'” reports TheNextWeb. Raising $3…

An anonymous reader writes: “Dan McComas, the former second-in-command at Reddit — and vocal critic of its more inflammatory groups — wants to build a better Reddit, one that focuses on ‘healthy, positive communities,'” reports TheNextWeb. Raising $3 million, Imzy.com quietly launched earlier this year with over 500 discussion forums, aspiring to become an advertising-free space where content creators can interact with their fans. Moderators and users of Imzy can be “tipped” with online payments from other users, while the site hopes to remain advertising-free by taking a cut from on-site transactions. But “at its core though, Imzy wants to provide a safe place to share and discuss without the fear of being harassed, a problem Reddit has struggled with for several years.”

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Fired Reddit Exec Launches Competing Site

An anonymous reader writes: “Dan McComas, the former second-in-command at Reddit — and vocal critic of its more inflammatory groups — wants to build a better Reddit, one that focuses on ‘healthy, positive communities,'” reports TheNextWeb. Raising $3…

An anonymous reader writes: “Dan McComas, the former second-in-command at Reddit — and vocal critic of its more inflammatory groups — wants to build a better Reddit, one that focuses on ‘healthy, positive communities,'” reports TheNextWeb. Raising $3 million, Imzy.com quietly launched earlier this year with over 500 discussion forums, aspiring to become an advertising-free space where content creators can interact with their fans. Moderators and users of Imzy can be “tipped” with online payments from other users, while the site hopes to remain advertising-free by taking a cut from on-site transactions. But “at its core though, Imzy wants to provide a safe place to share and discuss without the fear of being harassed, a problem Reddit has struggled with for several years.”

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Stephen Fry Urges Young To Flee ‘Dystopian’ Social Networks

An anonymous reader writes: English writer, presenter and activist Stephen Fry has urged his fans to abandon social networks, comparing such platforms to ‘dystopian’ forms of government seen in 1970s sci-fi films such as Logan’s Run and Soylent Green. …

An anonymous reader writes: English writer, presenter and activist Stephen Fry has urged his fans to abandon social networks, comparing such platforms to ‘dystopian’ forms of government seen in 1970s sci-fi films such as Logan’s Run and Soylent Green. In a 2,600-word essay, the comedian, who had over four million Twitter followers prior to deleting his account in February, also compared the ‘surveilled conformity’ of social media to the unreal state of society depicted in The Matrix. “Who most wants you to stay on the grid? The advertisers. Your boss. Human Resources. The advertisers. Your parents (irony of ironies — once they distrusted it, now they need to tag you electronically, share your Facebook photos and message you to death). The advertisers. The government. Your local authority. Your school. Advertisers,” he writes. “Well, if you’re young and have an ounce of pride, doesn’t that list say it all?”

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Stephen Fry Urges Young To Flee ‘Dystopian’ Social Networks

An anonymous reader writes: English writer, presenter and activist Stephen Fry has urged his fans to abandon social networks, comparing such platforms to ‘dystopian’ forms of government seen in 1970s sci-fi films such as Logan’s Run and Soylent Green. …

An anonymous reader writes: English writer, presenter and activist Stephen Fry has urged his fans to abandon social networks, comparing such platforms to ‘dystopian’ forms of government seen in 1970s sci-fi films such as Logan’s Run and Soylent Green. In a 2,600-word essay, the comedian, who had over four million Twitter followers prior to deleting his account in February, also compared the ‘surveilled conformity’ of social media to the unreal state of society depicted in The Matrix. “Who most wants you to stay on the grid? The advertisers. Your boss. Human Resources. The advertisers. Your parents (irony of ironies — once they distrusted it, now they need to tag you electronically, share your Facebook photos and message you to death). The advertisers. The government. Your local authority. Your school. Advertisers,” he writes. “Well, if you’re young and have an ounce of pride, doesn’t that list say it all?”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.