Facebook Told To Stop Taking Data From German WhatsApp Users

An anonymous reader shares a Bloomberg report: Facebook, already under scrutiny in the U.S. and the European Union for revisions to privacy policies for its WhatsApp messaging service, was ordered by Hamburg’s privacy watchdog to stop processing data o…

An anonymous reader shares a Bloomberg report: Facebook, already under scrutiny in the U.S. and the European Union for revisions to privacy policies for its WhatsApp messaging service, was ordered by Hamburg’s privacy watchdog to stop processing data of German users of the chat service. In a renewed clash with the social-network operator, Johannes Caspar, one of Germany’s most outspoken data protection commissioners, ordered Facebook to delete any data it already has. The news comes as EU privacy regulators, who previously expressed concerns about the policy shift, meet in Brussels to discuss their position. There’s no legal basis for Facebook to use information of WhatsApp customers, Caspar said Tuesday. “This order protects the data of about 35 million WhatsApp users in Germany,” Caspar said. “It has to be their decision as to whether they want to connect their account with Facebook. Therefore, Facebook has to ask for their permission in advance. This has not happened.”

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California Enacts Law Requiring IMDb To Remove Actor Ages On Request

California Gov. Jerry Brown on Saturday signed legislation that requires certain entertainment sites, such as IMDb, to remove — or not post in the first place — an actor’s age or birthday upon request, reports Hollywood Reporter. From the report: The…

California Gov. Jerry Brown on Saturday signed legislation that requires certain entertainment sites, such as IMDb, to remove — or not post in the first place — an actor’s age or birthday upon request, reports Hollywood Reporter. From the report: The law, which becomes effective Jan. 1, 2017, applies to entertainment database sites that allow paid subscribers to post resumes, headshots or other information for prospective employers. Only a paying subscriber can make a removal or nonpublication request. Although the legislation may be most critical for actors, it applies to all entertainment job categories. “Even though it is against both federal and state law, age discrimination persists in the entertainment industry,” Majority Leader Ian Calderon, D-Whittier, said in a statement. “AB 1687 provides the necessary tools to remove age information from online profiles on employment referral websites to help prevent this type of discrimination.”Bloomberg columnist, Shira Ovide said, “Congratulations, IMDB. You have now become the subject of California law.” Slate writer Will Oremus added, “Sometimes I start to think California is not such a bad place and then they go and do something like this.”

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California Enacts Law Requiring IMDb To Remove Actor Ages On Request

California Gov. Jerry Brown on Saturday signed legislation that requires certain entertainment sites, such as IMDb, to remove — or not post in the first place — an actor’s age or birthday upon request, reports Hollywood Reporter. From the report: The…

California Gov. Jerry Brown on Saturday signed legislation that requires certain entertainment sites, such as IMDb, to remove — or not post in the first place — an actor’s age or birthday upon request, reports Hollywood Reporter. From the report: The law, which becomes effective Jan. 1, 2017, applies to entertainment database sites that allow paid subscribers to post resumes, headshots or other information for prospective employers. Only a paying subscriber can make a removal or nonpublication request. Although the legislation may be most critical for actors, it applies to all entertainment job categories. “Even though it is against both federal and state law, age discrimination persists in the entertainment industry,” Majority Leader Ian Calderon, D-Whittier, said in a statement. “AB 1687 provides the necessary tools to remove age information from online profiles on employment referral websites to help prevent this type of discrimination.”Bloomberg columnist, Shira Ovide said, “Congratulations, IMDB. You have now become the subject of California law.” Slate writer Will Oremus added, “Sometimes I start to think California is not such a bad place and then they go and do something like this.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Woman Sues Sex Toy App For Secretly Capturing Sensitive Information

A woman in Chicago filed a class action lawsuit against the makers of a smartphone-enabled vibrator, alleging their devices “secretly collect and transmit ‘highly sensitive’ information.” CTV News reports:

The lawsuit, which was filed earlier this mon…

A woman in Chicago filed a class action lawsuit against the makers of a smartphone-enabled vibrator, alleging their devices “secretly collect and transmit ‘highly sensitive’ information.” CTV News reports:

The lawsuit, which was filed earlier this month in an Illinois court, explains that to fully operate the device, users download the We-Connect app on a smartphone, allowing them and their partners remote control over the Bluetooth-equipped vibrator’s settings… The suit alleges that unbeknownst to its customers, Standard Innovation designed the We-Connect app to collect and record intimate and sensitive data on use of the vibrator, including the date and time of each use as well as vibration settings… It also alleges the usage data and the user’s personal email address was transmitted to the company’s servers in Canada. The statement of claim alleges the company’s conduct demonstrates “a wholesale disregard” for consumer privacy rights and violated a number of state and federal laws.

Slashdot reader BarbaraHudson argues that “It kind of has to share that information if it’s going to be remotely controlled by someone else.”
But the woman’s lawsuit claims she wouldn’t have bought the device if she’d known that while using it, the manufacturer “would monitor, collect and transmit her usage information.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Woman Sues Sex Toy App For Secretly Capturing Sensitive Information

A woman in Chicago filed a class action lawsuit against the makers of a smartphone-enabled vibrator, alleging their devices “secretly collect and transmit ‘highly sensitive’ information.” CTV News reports:

The lawsuit, which was filed earlier this mon…

A woman in Chicago filed a class action lawsuit against the makers of a smartphone-enabled vibrator, alleging their devices “secretly collect and transmit ‘highly sensitive’ information.” CTV News reports:

The lawsuit, which was filed earlier this month in an Illinois court, explains that to fully operate the device, users download the We-Connect app on a smartphone, allowing them and their partners remote control over the Bluetooth-equipped vibrator’s settings… The suit alleges that unbeknownst to its customers, Standard Innovation designed the We-Connect app to collect and record intimate and sensitive data on use of the vibrator, including the date and time of each use as well as vibration settings… It also alleges the usage data and the user’s personal email address was transmitted to the company’s servers in Canada. The statement of claim alleges the company’s conduct demonstrates “a wholesale disregard” for consumer privacy rights and violated a number of state and federal laws.

Slashdot reader BarbaraHudson argues that “It kind of has to share that information if it’s going to be remotely controlled by someone else.”
But the woman’s lawsuit claims she wouldn’t have bought the device if she’d known that while using it, the manufacturer “would monitor, collect and transmit her usage information.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Right To Be Forgotten? Web Privacy Debate in Italy After Women’s Suicide

The suicide of a woman who battled for months to have a video of her having sex removed from the internet is fuelling debate in Italy on the “right to be forgotten” online. The 31-year-old, identified as Tiziana, was found hanged at her aunt’s home in …

The suicide of a woman who battled for months to have a video of her having sex removed from the internet is fuelling debate in Italy on the “right to be forgotten” online. The 31-year-old, identified as Tiziana, was found hanged at her aunt’s home in Mugnano, close to Naples in the country’s south on Tuesday, reports Agence France-Presse. From the report: Her death came a year after she sent a video of herself having sex to some friends, including her ex-boyfriend, to make him jealous. The video and her name soon found their way to the web and went viral, fuelling mockery of the woman online. The footage has been viewed by almost a million internet users. In a bid to escape the humiliation, Tiziana quit her job, moved to Tuscany and tried to change her name, but her nightmare went on. The words “You’re filming? Bravo,” spoken by the woman to her lover in the video, have become a derisive joke online, and the phrase has been printed on T-shirts, smartphone cases and other items. After a long court battle, Tiziana recently won a “right to be forgotten” ruling ordering the video to be removed from various sites and search engines, including Facebook.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Right To Be Forgotten? Web Privacy Debate in Italy After Women’s Suicide

The suicide of a woman who battled for months to have a video of her having sex removed from the internet is fuelling debate in Italy on the “right to be forgotten” online. The 31-year-old, identified as Tiziana, was found hanged at her aunt’s home in …

The suicide of a woman who battled for months to have a video of her having sex removed from the internet is fuelling debate in Italy on the “right to be forgotten” online. The 31-year-old, identified as Tiziana, was found hanged at her aunt’s home in Mugnano, close to Naples in the country’s south on Tuesday, reports Agence France-Presse. From the report: Her death came a year after she sent a video of herself having sex to some friends, including her ex-boyfriend, to make him jealous. The video and her name soon found their way to the web and went viral, fuelling mockery of the woman online. The footage has been viewed by almost a million internet users. In a bid to escape the humiliation, Tiziana quit her job, moved to Tuscany and tried to change her name, but her nightmare went on. The words “You’re filming? Bravo,” spoken by the woman to her lover in the video, have become a derisive joke online, and the phrase has been printed on T-shirts, smartphone cases and other items. After a long court battle, Tiziana recently won a “right to be forgotten” ruling ordering the video to be removed from various sites and search engines, including Facebook.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

A Woman Is Suing Her Parents For Posting Embarrassing Childhood Photos To Facebook

Earlier this year, we ran a story which talked about how a parent could be sued by their kids for posting their photos on Facebook. Over the past two years, we have seen several such cases, and now we have another one. From a report on NYMag:An 18-year…

Earlier this year, we ran a story which talked about how a parent could be sued by their kids for posting their photos on Facebook. Over the past two years, we have seen several such cases, and now we have another one. From a report on NYMag:An 18-year-old woman in Carinthia, Austria, is suing her parents over the 500-odd childhood photos they’ve posted of her on Facebook without her consent. “They knew no shame and no limit and didn’t care whether it was a picture of me sitting on the toilet or lying naked in my cot — every stage was photographed and then made public,” she told The Local, an English-language Austrian newspaper. She went on, “I’m tired of not being taken seriously by my parents,” who, despite her requests, have refused to take the photos down. The woman’s father reportedly believes he’s in the right to post the pictures because he took them. But her lawyer is adamant that if he can prove the photos violated the woman’s right to privacy, her parents could be forced to pay damages and legal fees.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

A Woman Is Suing Her Parents For Posting Embarrassing Childhood Photos To Facebook

Earlier this year, we ran a story which talked about how a parent could be sued by their kids for posting their photos on Facebook. Over the past two years, we have seen several such cases, and now we have another one. From a report on NYMag:An 18-year…

Earlier this year, we ran a story which talked about how a parent could be sued by their kids for posting their photos on Facebook. Over the past two years, we have seen several such cases, and now we have another one. From a report on NYMag:An 18-year-old woman in Carinthia, Austria, is suing her parents over the 500-odd childhood photos they’ve posted of her on Facebook without her consent. “They knew no shame and no limit and didn’t care whether it was a picture of me sitting on the toilet or lying naked in my cot — every stage was photographed and then made public,” she told The Local, an English-language Austrian newspaper. She went on, “I’m tired of not being taken seriously by my parents,” who, despite her requests, have refused to take the photos down. The woman’s father reportedly believes he’s in the right to post the pictures because he took them. But her lawyer is adamant that if he can prove the photos violated the woman’s right to privacy, her parents could be forced to pay damages and legal fees.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

None of Your Pixelated or Blurred Information Will Stay Safe On The Internet

The University of Texas at Austin and Cornell University are saying blurred or pixelated images are not as safe as they may seem. As machine learning technology improves, the methods used to hide sensitive information become less secure. Quartz reports…

The University of Texas at Austin and Cornell University are saying blurred or pixelated images are not as safe as they may seem. As machine learning technology improves, the methods used to hide sensitive information become less secure. Quartz reports: Using simple deep learning tools, the three-person team was able to identify obfuscated faces and numbers with alarming accuracy. On an industry standard dataset where humans had 0.19% chance of identifying a face, the algorithm had 71% accuracy (or 83% if allowed to guess five times). The algorithm doesn’t produce a deblurred image — it simply identifies what it sees in the obscured photo, based on information it already knows. The approach works with blurred and pixelated images, as well as P3, a type of JPEG encryption pitched as a secure way to hide information. The attack uses Torch (an open-source deep learning library), Torch templates for neural networks, and standard open-source data. To build the attacks that identified faces in YouTube videos, researchers took publicly-available pictures and blurred the faces with YouTube’s video tool. They then fed the algorithm both sets of images, so it could learn how to correlate blur patterns to the unobscured faces. When given different images of the same people, the algorithm could determine their identity with 57% accuracy, or 85% percent when given five chances. The report mentions Max Planck Institute’s work on identifying people in blurred Facebook photos. The difference between the two research is that UT and Cornell’s research is much more simple, and “shows how weak these privacy methods really are.”

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