privacy

Uber Revises Privacy Policy, Wants More Data From Users

itwbennett tips news that Uber has amended its privacy policy, making it much simpler to read and understand. But the policy also includes changes to what data Uber collects about its riders. Beginning July 15th, the Uber phone app will keep track of a rider’s location while it’s running in the background. Uber says riders will be able to opt out of this tracking. The policy changes also allow for advertising using the rider’s contact list: “for example the ability to send special offers to riders’ friends or family.” The revision of Uber’s privacy policy followed complaints at the end of last year that the company was overstepping its bounds.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Sexting scandal: 20 students charged at New Jersey high school

Sexting-investigation

Feed-twFeed-fb

A recent police investigation in New Jersey found that more than a dozen middle and high school students traded explicit images of female students via text messaging and social media

The prosecutor’s office in Cape May announced invasion of privacy charges against 19 juveniles and one adult, on Tuesday. The adult, according to WPVI-TV, is an 18-year-old student

The charge is a third-degree crime that can result in as many as five years in state prison for adults and two years in a training school for juveniles

Officials at the Lower Cape May Regional High School and the Richard M. Teitelman Middle School learned of the sexting in April when a young female student reported that photos of her friend, who appeared naked, were being texted to male students Read more…

More about Privacy, Women, Sexting, U.S., and Gender


Sniffing and Tracking Wearable Tech and Smartphones

An anonymous reader writes: Senior researcher Scott Lester at Context Information Security has shown how someone can easily monitor and record Bluetooth Low Energy signals transmitted by many mobile phones, fitness monitors, and iBeacons. The findings have raised concerns about the privacy and confidentiality wearable devices may provide. “Many people wearing fitness devices don’t realize that they are broadcasting constantly and that these broadcasts can often be attributed to a unique device,” said Scott says. “Using cheap hardware or a smartphone, it could be possible to identify and locate a particular device – that may belong to a celebrity, politician or senior business executive – within 100 meters in the open air. This information could be used for social engineering as part of a planned cyber attack or for physical crime by knowing peoples’ movements.” The researchers have even developed an Android app that scans, detects and logs wearable devices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Hackers Can Track Subway Riders’ Movements By Smartphone Accelerometer

Patrick O’Neill writes: Tens of millions of daily subway riders around the world can be tracked through their smartphones by a new attack, according to research from China’s Nanjing University. The new attack even works underground and doesn’t utilize GPS or cell networks. Instead, the attacker steals data from a phone’s accelerometer. Because each subway in the world has a unique movement fingerprint, the phone’s motion sensor can give away a person’s daily movements with up to 92% accuracy.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Privacy Behaviors Changed Little After Snowden

An anonymous reader writes: An article in Communications of the ACM takes a look at how Edward Snowden’s revelations about government surveillance have changed privacy behaviors across the world. The results are fairly disappointing. While the news that intelligence agencies were trawling data from everyday citizens sparked an interest in privacy, it was small, and faded quickly. Even through media coverage has continued for a long time after the initial reports, public interest dropped back to earlier levels long ago. The initial interest spike was notably less than for other major news events. Privacy-enhancing behaviors experienced a small surge, but that too failed to impart any long-term momentum. The author notes that the spike in interest “following the removal of privacy-enhancing functions in Facebook, Android, and Gmail” was stronger than the reaction to the government’s privacy-eroding actions.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

San Bernardino Sheriff Has Used Stingray Over 300 Times With No Warrant

An anonymous reader writes: After a records request by Ars, the sheriff in San Bernardino County (SBSD) sent an example of a template for a “pen register and trap and trace order” application. The county attorneys claim what they sent was a warrant application template, even though it is not. The application cites no legal authority on which to base the request. “This is astonishing because it suggests the absence of legal authorization (because if there were clear legal authorization you can bet the government would be citing it),” Fred Cate, a law professor at Indiana University, told Ars. “Alternatively, it might suggest that the government just doesn’t care about legal authorization. Either interpretation is profoundly troubling,” he added. Further documents reveal that the agency has used a Stingray 303 times between January 1, 2014 and May 7, 2015.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The Internet golden rule: Pretend your online sex is already public knowledge

42-20873432

Feed-twFeed-fb

Time to update the adage “She’s a lady in the street and a freak in the sheets.” Let’s just simplify that to: “Actually? We’re all a bunch of freaks in the sheets – thanks, Internet!”

Everyone and everything we do online is at risk

In March, a lone Darknet user exposed nearly 4 million users’ data from their activity on an adult dating site. Independent IT security consultant Bev Robb uncovered the hack and reported it on her site April 13: a “treasure trove of hacked data that appears to be from an adult social networking site…one of the most heavily-trafficked websites in the world, boasting an Alexa U.S. page rank slightly above 747.” Read more…

More about Hacking, Security, Features, Privacy, and Tech


Mozilla Will Soon Launch Sponsored Suggested Tiles Based On Your Browsing History

2015-05-21_0942 It’s pretty odd hearing a not-for-profit organization like Mozilla talk about how it wants to help advertisers strengthen the conversation between brands and its users — especially given that I’ve never met anybody who wanted to have a conversation with a brand. But that’s the world we live in. Mozilla today launched its ‘Suggested Tiles’ program, which… Read More

CareFirst Admits More Than a Million Customer Accounts Were Exposed In Security Breach

An anonymous reader writes with news, as reported by The Stack, that regional health insurer CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, has confirmed a breach which took place last summer, and may have leaked personal details of as many as 1.1 million of the company’s customers: “The Washington D.C.-based firm announced yesterday that the hack had taken place in June last year. CareFirst said that the breach had been a ‘sophisticated cyberattack’ and that those behind the crime had accessed and potentially stolen sensitive customer data including names, dates of birth, email addresses and ID numbers. All affected members will receive letters of apology, offering two years of free credit monitoring and identity threat protection as compensation, CareFirst said in a statement posted on its website.” Free credit monitoring is pretty weak sauce for anyone who actually ends up faced with identity fraud.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Simple Flaw Exposed Data On Millions of Charter Internet Customers

Daniel_Stuckey writes: A security flaw discovered in the website of Charter Communications, a cable and Internet provider active in 28 states, may have exposed the personal account details of millions of its customers. Security researcher Eric Taylor discovered the internet service provider’s vulnerability as part of his research, and demonstrated how a simple header modification performed with a browser plug-in could reveal details of Charter subscriber accounts. After Fast Company notified Charter of the issue, the company said it had installed a fix within hours.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.