Google Boosts Mobile Web Speed On Apple Devices With Accelerated Mobile Pages

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Fortune: The Google iOS app for devices like the iPhone and iPad now supports the search giant’s Accelerated Mobile Pages project, created to increase the loading times of news articles on the Internet. Now when…

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Fortune: The Google iOS app for devices like the iPhone and iPad now supports the search giant’s Accelerated Mobile Pages project, created to increase the loading times of news articles on the Internet. Now when users search for news from their Apple devices using the Google app, they should see streamlined news articles from media companies like The Washington Post that chose to participate in Google’s web project. The AMP project is a Google-led initiative to standardize the software code behind each news article on the mobile web. AMP was designed to remove years of accumulated software code that has built up on online publishers’ websites. As of Friday, iOS users should see a lightning bolt graphic and the letters “AMP” next to news articles from participating publishers in the “Top Stories” section of their search results in the Google app.

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Google Boosts Mobile Web Speed On Apple Devices With Accelerated Mobile Pages

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Fortune: The Google iOS app for devices like the iPhone and iPad now supports the search giant’s Accelerated Mobile Pages project, created to increase the loading times of news articles on the Internet. Now when…

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Fortune: The Google iOS app for devices like the iPhone and iPad now supports the search giant’s Accelerated Mobile Pages project, created to increase the loading times of news articles on the Internet. Now when users search for news from their Apple devices using the Google app, they should see streamlined news articles from media companies like The Washington Post that chose to participate in Google’s web project. The AMP project is a Google-led initiative to standardize the software code behind each news article on the mobile web. AMP was designed to remove years of accumulated software code that has built up on online publishers’ websites. As of Friday, iOS users should see a lightning bolt graphic and the letters “AMP” next to news articles from participating publishers in the “Top Stories” section of their search results in the Google app.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Doesn’t Owe Oracle a Cent for Using Java in Android, Jury Finds

The verdict could have major implications for the future of software developments. The post Google Doesn’t Owe Oracle a Cent for Using Java in Android, Jury Finds appeared first on WIRED.

Google Doesn’t Owe Oracle a Cent for Using Java in Android, Jury Finds

The verdict could have major implications for the future of software developments. The post Google Doesn’t Owe Oracle a Cent for Using Java in Android, Jury Finds appeared first on WIRED.

Android Is ‘Fair Use’ As Google Beats Oracle In $9 Billion Lawsuit

infernalC writes: Ars Technica is reporting that the verdict is in, and that the jury decided that Google’s duplication of several Java interfaces is fair use. Ars Technica writes that Google’s Android OS does not infringe upon Oracle-owned copyrights …

infernalC writes: Ars Technica is reporting that the verdict is in, and that the jury decided that Google’s duplication of several Java interfaces is fair use. Ars Technica writes that Google’s Android OS does not infringe upon Oracle-owned copyrights because its re-implementation of 37 Java APIs is protected by “fair use.” The jury unanimously answered “yes” in response to whether or not Google’s use of Java APIs was a “fair use” under copyright law. The trial is now over, since Google won. “Google’s win somewhat softens the blow to software developers who previously thought programming language APIs were free to use,” Ars Technica writes. “It’s still the case that APIs can be protected by copyright under the law of at least one appeals court. However, the first high-profile attempt to control APIs with copyright law has now been stymied by a “fair use” defense.” The amount Oracle may have asked for in damages could have been as much as $9 billion.

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Android Is ‘Fair Use’ As Google Beats Oracle In $9 Billion Lawsuit

infernalC writes: Ars Technica is reporting that the verdict is in, and that the jury decided that Google’s duplication of several Java interfaces is fair use. Ars Technica writes that Google’s Android OS does not infringe upon Oracle-owned copyrights …

infernalC writes: Ars Technica is reporting that the verdict is in, and that the jury decided that Google’s duplication of several Java interfaces is fair use. Ars Technica writes that Google’s Android OS does not infringe upon Oracle-owned copyrights because its re-implementation of 37 Java APIs is protected by “fair use.” The jury unanimously answered “yes” in response to whether or not Google’s use of Java APIs was a “fair use” under copyright law. The trial is now over, since Google won. “Google’s win somewhat softens the blow to software developers who previously thought programming language APIs were free to use,” Ars Technica writes. “It’s still the case that APIs can be protected by copyright under the law of at least one appeals court. However, the first high-profile attempt to control APIs with copyright law has now been stymied by a “fair use” defense.” The amount Oracle may have asked for in damages could have been as much as $9 billion.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook and Microsoft Are Laying a Giant Cable Across the Atlantic

Internet giants are starting to build enormous networks of their own, taking over the role traditionally played by telecom companies. The post Facebook and Microsoft Are Laying a Giant Cable Across the Atlantic appeared first on WIRED.

Facebook and Microsoft Are Laying a Giant Cable Across the Atlantic

Internet giants are starting to build enormous networks of their own, taking over the role traditionally played by telecom companies. The post Facebook and Microsoft Are Laying a Giant Cable Across the Atlantic appeared first on WIRED.

Get Ready To Be Bombarded With Ads When Using Google Maps

An anonymous reader writes: The chance to squeeze some extra advertising dollars is something rarely missed by Google. This week the company quietly announced changes to two of its most widely used services, offering businesses the chance to pay for fe…

An anonymous reader writes: The chance to squeeze some extra advertising dollars is something rarely missed by Google. This week the company quietly announced changes to two of its most widely used services, offering businesses the chance to pay for featured advertisements in Google.com and Google Maps. In a blog post, Google senior ads vice president Sridhar Ramaswamy outlined the likely changes to Google Maps that will see users met with pop-up ads for local businesses when they use the GPS-based app. The announcement has been facetiously described online as “the Ad-pocalypse” but Google has shown more tact in their use of language, referring to the ads as “promoted pins”.

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Google Built an Escape Room, Making People Use Its Apps To Get Out

An anonymous reader writes: Google France has built an escape room created by We Are Social, called “Premiere Piece,” that will open in the heart of Paris. Adweek writes: “The campaign builds on the escape room trend, in which you and a bunch of friend…

An anonymous reader writes: Google France has built an escape room created by We Are Social, called “Premiere Piece,” that will open in the heart of Paris. Adweek writes: “The campaign builds on the escape room trend, in which you and a bunch of friends pay to get locked in a room for an hour or two, left to solve puzzles and work in collaboration to find a way out. In 40 minutes, you must solve puzzles with help from apps like Search, Maps, Translate, Photos, Art and Culture and Cardboard, all of which are integrated into the gameplay. In Premiere Piece, visitors must help save a crew of digital artists locked in a workshop, so they can present their painstaking work at an art center in Paris. By working together, participants must unlock an object that completes their masterpiece.” Google France was in the news recently for being raided by investigators for unpaid taxes.

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Google Built an Escape Room, Making People Use Its Apps To Get Out

An anonymous reader writes: Google France has built an escape room created by We Are Social, called “Premiere Piece,” that will open in the heart of Paris. Adweek writes: “The campaign builds on the escape room trend, in which you and a bunch of friend…

An anonymous reader writes: Google France has built an escape room created by We Are Social, called “Premiere Piece,” that will open in the heart of Paris. Adweek writes: “The campaign builds on the escape room trend, in which you and a bunch of friends pay to get locked in a room for an hour or two, left to solve puzzles and work in collaboration to find a way out. In 40 minutes, you must solve puzzles with help from apps like Search, Maps, Translate, Photos, Art and Culture and Cardboard, all of which are integrated into the gameplay. In Premiere Piece, visitors must help save a crew of digital artists locked in a workshop, so they can present their painstaking work at an art center in Paris. By working together, participants must unlock an object that completes their masterpiece.” Google France was in the news recently for being raided by investigators for unpaid taxes.

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Google France Being Raided For Unpaid Taxes

jones_supa writes: Investigators in France have raided Google’s Paris headquarters amid a probe over the company’s tax payments, Reuters reports. The French Finance Ministry is investigating $1.8 billion in back taxes. According to a report in French d…

jones_supa writes: Investigators in France have raided Google’s Paris headquarters amid a probe over the company’s tax payments, Reuters reports. The French Finance Ministry is investigating $1.8 billion in back taxes. According to a report in French daily Le Parisien, at least 100 investigators are part of the raid at Google’s offices. A source close to the finance ministry said that the raid at Google’s offices has been ongoing on Tuesday since 03:00 GMT. In February, a source at the French Finance Ministry told Reuters that the government was seeking the $1.8 billion from Google. At the time, official spokespeople for Google France and the Finance Ministry refused to comment on the situation. Google could face up to a $11.14 million fine if it is found guilty, or a fine of half of the value of the laundered amount involved. In April, the EU revealed plans to force multinationals such as Google, Amazon and Facebook to disclose exactly where and how much tax they pay across the continent. A new clause was added since the Panama Papers leak requiring the companies to report how much money they make in so-called “tax havens.”

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