Everyone Wants a Level 5 Self-Driving Car—Here’s What That Means

Everyone Wants a Level 5 Self-Driving Car—Here’s What That Means

As cars that drive themselves evolve and spread over the coming years, here’s a guide for understanding what’s left for you to do. The post Everyone Wants a Level 5 Self-Driving Car—Here’s What That Means appeared first on WIRED.

Everyone Wants a Level 5 Self-Driving Car—Here’s What That Means

As cars that drive themselves evolve and spread over the coming years, here’s a guide for understanding what’s left for you to do. The post Everyone Wants a Level 5 Self-Driving Car—Here’s What That Means appeared first on WIRED.

Google Fiber To Cut Staff In Half After User Totals Disappoint, Says Report

An anonymous reader quotes a report from DSLReports: Sources claim that Google Fiber has been disappointed with the company’s overall number of total subscribers since launching five years ago. A paywalled report over at The Information cites a variety…

An anonymous reader quotes a report from DSLReports: Sources claim that Google Fiber has been disappointed with the company’s overall number of total subscribers since launching five years ago. A paywalled report over at The Information cites a variety of anonymous current and former Google employees, who say the estimated 200,000 or so broadband subscribers the company had managed to sign up by the end of 2014 was a fary cry from the company’s original projection of somewhere closer to 5 million. Google Fiber has never revealed its total number of subscribers. A report last October pegged the company’s total broadband subscribers at somewhere around 120,000, though it’s unclear how many of those users had signed up for Google Fiber’s symmetrical 5 Mbps tier, which was originally free after users paid a $300 installation fee. Disappointed by sluggish subscriber tallies, The Information report states that last month Alphabet CEO Larry Page ordered Google Fiber boss Craig Barratt to cut the total Google Fiber staff in half to roughly 500 people. That’s a claim that’s sure to only fuel continued speculation that the company is starting to get cold feet about its attempts to bring broadband competition to a broken duopoly market.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Fiber To Cut Staff In Half After User Totals Disappoint, Says Report

An anonymous reader quotes a report from DSLReports: Sources claim that Google Fiber has been disappointed with the company’s overall number of total subscribers since launching five years ago. A paywalled report over at The Information cites a variety…

An anonymous reader quotes a report from DSLReports: Sources claim that Google Fiber has been disappointed with the company’s overall number of total subscribers since launching five years ago. A paywalled report over at The Information cites a variety of anonymous current and former Google employees, who say the estimated 200,000 or so broadband subscribers the company had managed to sign up by the end of 2014 was a fary cry from the company’s original projection of somewhere closer to 5 million. Google Fiber has never revealed its total number of subscribers. A report last October pegged the company’s total broadband subscribers at somewhere around 120,000, though it’s unclear how many of those users had signed up for Google Fiber’s symmetrical 5 Mbps tier, which was originally free after users paid a $300 installation fee. Disappointed by sluggish subscriber tallies, The Information report states that last month Alphabet CEO Larry Page ordered Google Fiber boss Craig Barratt to cut the total Google Fiber staff in half to roughly 500 people. That’s a claim that’s sure to only fuel continued speculation that the company is starting to get cold feet about its attempts to bring broadband competition to a broken duopoly market.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

You Can Now Play Solitaire and Tic-Tac-Toe in Google’s Search Results

Paul Sawers, writing for VentureBeat: Google announced a couple of fun little nuggets today: you can now play Solitaire and Tic-Tac-Toe directly in Google’s search results. Available through the desktop and Google mobile apps, anyone searching for the …

Paul Sawers, writing for VentureBeat: Google announced a couple of fun little nuggets today: you can now play Solitaire and Tic-Tac-Toe directly in Google’s search results. Available through the desktop and Google mobile apps, anyone searching for the keywords “solitaire” or “tic-tac-toe” will see the usual search results, but featured prominently alongside them you’ll also now see a “tap to play” option which whisks you off to play the game. Google is no stranger to hiding so-called “easter eggs” in its products, including Search — for example, last year it had a surprise in store to mark the anniversary of Super Mario. Moreover, Google already lets you play some games within Search, including Pacman.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

You Can Now Play Solitaire and Tic-Tac-Toe in Google’s Search Results

Paul Sawers, writing for VentureBeat: Google announced a couple of fun little nuggets today: you can now play Solitaire and Tic-Tac-Toe directly in Google’s search results. Available through the desktop and Google mobile apps, anyone searching for the …

Paul Sawers, writing for VentureBeat: Google announced a couple of fun little nuggets today: you can now play Solitaire and Tic-Tac-Toe directly in Google’s search results. Available through the desktop and Google mobile apps, anyone searching for the keywords “solitaire” or “tic-tac-toe” will see the usual search results, but featured prominently alongside them you’ll also now see a “tap to play” option which whisks you off to play the game. Google is no stranger to hiding so-called “easter eggs” in its products, including Search — for example, last year it had a surprise in store to mark the anniversary of Super Mario. Moreover, Google already lets you play some games within Search, including Pacman.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Search Removes ‘Mobile-Friendly’ Label, Will Tackle Interstitials Next

An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: Google today announced two updates to mobile search results: an aesthetic one rolling out now and an algorithmic one coming next year. The former consists of removing the “mobile-friendly” label in …

An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: Google today announced two updates to mobile search results: an aesthetic one rolling out now and an algorithmic one coming next year. The former consists of removing the “mobile-friendly” label in search results and the latter will punish mobile sites that use interstitials. The goal is to “make finding content easier for users,” though as always, the company didn’t share exactly how much of an impact users and webmasters can expect. The report adds: “If your site is in the 15 percent group, here’s a quick recap. A webpage is considered ‘mobile friendly’ if it meets the following criteria, as detected in real time by Googlebot: Avoids software that is not common on mobile devices, like Flash; Uses text that is readable without zooming; Sizes content to the screen so users don’t have to scroll horizontally or zoom; Places links far enough apart so that the correct one can be easily tapped. The company now wants to tackle ‘intrusive interstitials’ as they ‘provide a poorer experience to users than other pages where content is immediately accessible.’ After January 10, 2017, pages where content is not easily accessible when coming from mobile search results ‘may not rank as highly.’ Interstitials that Google doesn’t like include showing a popup that covers the main content (immediately or delayed), displaying a standalone interstitial that the user has to dismiss before accessing the main content, and using a layout where the above-the-fold portion is similar to a standalone interstitial but the original content is inlined underneath. Interstitials that Google deems OK include legal obligations (cookie usage or for age verification), login dialogs on sites where content is not publicly indexable, and banners that use a reasonable amount of screen space and are easily dismissible.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Search Removes ‘Mobile-Friendly’ Label, Will Tackle Interstitials Next

An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: Google today announced two updates to mobile search results: an aesthetic one rolling out now and an algorithmic one coming next year. The former consists of removing the “mobile-friendly” label in …

An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: Google today announced two updates to mobile search results: an aesthetic one rolling out now and an algorithmic one coming next year. The former consists of removing the “mobile-friendly” label in search results and the latter will punish mobile sites that use interstitials. The goal is to “make finding content easier for users,” though as always, the company didn’t share exactly how much of an impact users and webmasters can expect. The report adds: “If your site is in the 15 percent group, here’s a quick recap. A webpage is considered ‘mobile friendly’ if it meets the following criteria, as detected in real time by Googlebot: Avoids software that is not common on mobile devices, like Flash; Uses text that is readable without zooming; Sizes content to the screen so users don’t have to scroll horizontally or zoom; Places links far enough apart so that the correct one can be easily tapped. The company now wants to tackle ‘intrusive interstitials’ as they ‘provide a poorer experience to users than other pages where content is immediately accessible.’ After January 10, 2017, pages where content is not easily accessible when coming from mobile search results ‘may not rank as highly.’ Interstitials that Google doesn’t like include showing a popup that covers the main content (immediately or delayed), displaying a standalone interstitial that the user has to dismiss before accessing the main content, and using a layout where the above-the-fold portion is similar to a standalone interstitial but the original content is inlined underneath. Interstitials that Google deems OK include legal obligations (cookie usage or for age verification), login dialogs on sites where content is not publicly indexable, and banners that use a reasonable amount of screen space and are easily dismissible.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

At 25, the World Wide Web Is Still a Long Way From Reality

The web’s not dead. But the dream of truly democratized media is still a dream. The post At 25, the World Wide Web Is Still a Long Way From Reality appeared first on WIRED.

At 25, the World Wide Web Is Still a Long Way From Reality

The web’s not dead. But the dream of truly democratized media is still a dream. The post At 25, the World Wide Web Is Still a Long Way From Reality appeared first on WIRED.

Android Nougat Proves How Good Google’s OS Already Is

Android’s in the spit-shining phase: It’s mature and finished, but it could always be a little cleaner and prettier. The post Android Nougat Proves How Good Google’s OS Already Is appeared first on WIRED.

Android Nougat Proves How Good Google’s OS Already Is

Android’s in the spit-shining phase: It’s mature and finished, but it could always be a little cleaner and prettier. The post Android Nougat Proves How Good Google’s OS Already Is appeared first on WIRED.

Fake Google Salesmen Are Actually SEO Telemarketers

Long-time Slashdot reader Lauren Weinstein writes: It seems like almost every day I get junk solicitation phone calls “from Google.” They call about my Google business local listings, about my not being on the first page of Google search results, and s…

Long-time Slashdot reader Lauren Weinstein writes: It seems like almost every day I get junk solicitation phone calls “from Google.” They call about my Google business local listings, about my not being on the first page of Google search results, and so on — and they want me to pay them to “fix” this stuff. When I look up the Caller ID numbers they use, I often finds pages of people claiming they’re Google phone numbers. Sometimes the Caller ID display actually says Google!
Is Google really doing this? Negative. NONE of these calls are from Google. Zero. Zilch. Nada. These callers are inevitably “SEO”; (Search Engine Optimization) scammers of one sort or another. They make millions of “cold calls” to businesses using public phone listings (from the Web or other sources) or using phone number lists purchased from brokers. If you ever actually deal with them, you’ll find that their services typically range from useless to dangerous.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.