Judge Skewers Oracle Attorney For Revealing Google, Apple Trade Secrets

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The federal judge who presided over the Google-Oracle API copyright infringement trial excoriated one of Oracle’s lawyers Thursday for disclosing confidential information in open court earlier this…

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The federal judge who presided over the Google-Oracle API copyright infringement trial excoriated one of Oracle’s lawyers Thursday for disclosing confidential information in open court earlier this year. The confidential information included financial figures stating that Google generated $31 billion in revenue and $22 billion in profits from the Android operating system in the wake of its 2008 debut. The Oracle attorney, Annette Hurst, also revealed another trade secret: Google paid Apple $1 billion in 2014 to include Google search on iPhones. Judge William Alsup of San Francisco has been presiding over the copyright infringement trial since 2010, when Oracle lodged a lawsuit claiming that Google’s Android operating system infringed Oracle’s Java APIs. After two trials and various trips to the appellate courts, a San Francisco federal jury concluded in May that Google’s use of the APIs amounted to fair use. Oracle’s motion before Alsup for a third trial is pending. Oracle argues that Google tainted the verdict by concealing a plan to extend Android on desktop and laptop computers. As this legal saga was playing out, Hurst blurted out the confidential figures during a January 14 pre-trial hearing, despite those numbers being protected by a court order. The transcript of that proceeding has been erased from the public record. But the genie is out of the bottle. Google lodged a motion (PDF) for sanctions and a contempt finding against Hurst for unveiling a closely guarded secret of the mobile phone wars. During a hearing on that motion Thursday, Judge Alsup had a back-and-forth with Hurst’s attorney, former San Francisco U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag. According to the San Francisco legal journal The Recorder, Haag said that her client Hurst — of the law firm Orrick, Herrington and Sutcliffe — should not be sanctioned because of “one arguable mistake made through the course of a very complex litigation.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google To Introduce Google Wifi, Google Home and 4K Chromecast Ultra Devices On October 4th

Android Police has learned of a new Google device that will launch alongside the Google Pixel smartphones, Google Home, and 4K ‘Chromecast Ultra’ dongle on October 4th. Called Google Wifi, the Wi-Fi router will cost $129 and contain several “smart” fea…

Android Police has learned of a new Google device that will launch alongside the Google Pixel smartphones, Google Home, and 4K ‘Chromecast Ultra’ dongle on October 4th. Called Google Wifi, the Wi-Fi router will cost $129 and contain several “smart” features. Android Police reports: [The] source additionally claims that Google will advertise the router as having “smart” features — probably similar to OnHub in some respects — and that Google will claim it provides enhanced range over typical Wi-Fi routers (a claim we see basically every router make, to be fair). But the one thing that will make it an insta-buy for many over OnHub? Our source claims multiple Google Wifi access points (two or more) can be linked together to create one large wireless network. We don’t have any details on how this works, unfortunately. But one source claims that Google Wifi device will essentially be like a little white Amazon Echo Dot. So, relatively small and inconspicuous. In a separate report, Android Police details Google’s upcoming smart speaker called Google Home, along with their upcoming 4K ‘Chromecast Ultra’ devices. Specifically, they will be priced at $129 and $69 respectively: Google Home was announced at Google I/O in May. Our sources also confirmed that the personalized base covers Google showed at I/O will be a feature of the final device. $129 also undercuts Amazon’s Echo by a full $40, and though matches the price of the portable Amazon Tap, it’s clear Google has Amazon’s flagship smart home product in its sights with Home. Chromecast Ultra, which we are now all but certain is the name of Google’s upcoming 4K version of Chromecast, will come in at $69 retail. As for what it brings beyond 4K, one of our sources claims that HDR is indeed on the list of bullet points.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

YouTube Is Looking for Volunteers To Improve Its Site

The video-sharing site is looking for “heroes.” YouTube is looking for a few good users who want to be “Heroes.” Google’s video-sharing site wants volunteers to help moderate its content by flagging inappropriate content, fielding questions in YouTube …

The video-sharing site is looking for “heroes.” YouTube is looking for a few good users who want to be “Heroes.” Google’s video-sharing site wants volunteers to help moderate its content by flagging inappropriate content, fielding questions in YouTube Help forums, and contributing video captions and subtitles, reports Reuters. From the report:Performing those types of tasks will help users earn points in the site’s new crowdsourcing program, called “YouTube Heroes.” YouTube announced the “Heroes” program in a post on the site’s help channel on Wednesday that included a video showing prospective volunteers how they can participate and the perks they can earn. “You work hard to make YouTube better for everyone and, like all heroes, you deserve a place to call home,” YouTube says in the video.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

YouTube Is Looking for Volunteers To Improve Its Site

The video-sharing site is looking for “heroes.” YouTube is looking for a few good users who want to be “Heroes.” Google’s video-sharing site wants volunteers to help moderate its content by flagging inappropriate content, fielding questions in YouTube …

The video-sharing site is looking for “heroes.” YouTube is looking for a few good users who want to be “Heroes.” Google’s video-sharing site wants volunteers to help moderate its content by flagging inappropriate content, fielding questions in YouTube Help forums, and contributing video captions and subtitles, reports Reuters. From the report:Performing those types of tasks will help users earn points in the site’s new crowdsourcing program, called “YouTube Heroes.” YouTube announced the “Heroes” program in a post on the site’s help channel on Wednesday that included a video showing prospective volunteers how they can participate and the perks they can earn. “You work hard to make YouTube better for everyone and, like all heroes, you deserve a place to call home,” YouTube says in the video.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Backs Off On Previously Announced Allo Privacy Feature

When Google first unveiled its Allo messaging app, the company said it would not keep a log of chats you have with people when in incognito mode. The company released Allo for iOS and Android users last night, and it seems it is reneging on some of tho…

When Google first unveiled its Allo messaging app, the company said it would not keep a log of chats you have with people when in incognito mode. The company released Allo for iOS and Android users last night, and it seems it is reneging on some of those promises. The Verge reports:The version of Allo rolling out today will store all non-incognito messages by default — a clear change from Google’s earlier statements that the app would only store messages transiently and in non-identifiable form. The records will now persist until the user actively deletes them, giving Google default access to a full history of conversations in the app. Users can also avoid the logging by using Alo’s Incognito Mode, which is still fully end-to-end encrypted and unchanged from the initial announcement. Like Hangouts and Gmail, Allo messages will still be encrypted between the device and Google servers, and stored on servers using encryption that leaves the messages accessible to Google’s algorithms. According to Google, the change was made to improve the Allo assistant’s smart reply feature, which generates suggested responses to a given conversation. Like most machine learning systems, the smart replies work better with more data. As the Allo team tested those replies, they decided the performance boost from permanently stored messages was worth giving up privacy benefits of transient storage.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Launches ‘Google Trips’ Personalized Travel Planner

Google has an app for just about everything. Their latest application, called Google Trips, aims to help you better plan your vacations and other travels. TechCrunch reports: Called Google Trips, the iOS and Android app pulls in a combination of data f…

Google has an app for just about everything. Their latest application, called Google Trips, aims to help you better plan your vacations and other travels. TechCrunch reports: Called Google Trips, the iOS and Android app pulls in a combination of data from Google Maps and crowdsourced contributions from other travels, in order to offer a personalized travel guide that helps you keep track of your day trips, reservations, points of interest, tourist attractions, restaurants and more. The home screen includes a search box with a prompt “where do you want to go?” for planning new trips, and other cards let you keep track of your current and upcoming vacations and plans. What’s helpful is that each city you plan to visit during one of your trips can each have its own tab within the larger “Trip” section, and with a simple toggle switch, you can download all the information about that destination for offline access. Meanwhile, on each city’s screen, a variety of colorful cards help you jump into various sections like “Saved places,” “Day Plans,” “Food and Drink,” “Getting around,” “Things to do,” “Reservations,” and more. Google says Trips can show you the most popular day plans and itineraries for the top 200 cities worldwide. This information is actually based on historic visit data from other travelers, which Google has then assembled into lists that include the most popular sights and attractions. In addition to sightseeing, the app can also track flight, hotel, car and restaurant reservations, which makes the app something of a competitor to Concur’s TripIt, and, to some extend, the new territory Airbnb is carving out with its own forthcoming Airbnb Trips app, which will focus on travel services. However, what makes Google Trips compelling is that it leverages Google’s ability to tap into the data you have stored in your Gmail, as it automatically gathers your reservations from your email and organizes them into trips on your behalf. Google Trips is live now on Android and iOS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Launches ‘Google Trips’ Personalized Travel Planner

Google has an app for just about everything. Their latest application, called Google Trips, aims to help you better plan your vacations and other travels. TechCrunch reports: Called Google Trips, the iOS and Android app pulls in a combination of data f…

Google has an app for just about everything. Their latest application, called Google Trips, aims to help you better plan your vacations and other travels. TechCrunch reports: Called Google Trips, the iOS and Android app pulls in a combination of data from Google Maps and crowdsourced contributions from other travels, in order to offer a personalized travel guide that helps you keep track of your day trips, reservations, points of interest, tourist attractions, restaurants and more. The home screen includes a search box with a prompt “where do you want to go?” for planning new trips, and other cards let you keep track of your current and upcoming vacations and plans. What’s helpful is that each city you plan to visit during one of your trips can each have its own tab within the larger “Trip” section, and with a simple toggle switch, you can download all the information about that destination for offline access. Meanwhile, on each city’s screen, a variety of colorful cards help you jump into various sections like “Saved places,” “Day Plans,” “Food and Drink,” “Getting around,” “Things to do,” “Reservations,” and more. Google says Trips can show you the most popular day plans and itineraries for the top 200 cities worldwide. This information is actually based on historic visit data from other travelers, which Google has then assembled into lists that include the most popular sights and attractions. In addition to sightseeing, the app can also track flight, hotel, car and restaurant reservations, which makes the app something of a competitor to Concur’s TripIt, and, to some extend, the new territory Airbnb is carving out with its own forthcoming Airbnb Trips app, which will focus on travel services. However, what makes Google Trips compelling is that it leverages Google’s ability to tap into the data you have stored in your Gmail, as it automatically gathers your reservations from your email and organizes them into trips on your behalf. Google Trips is live now on Android and iOS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google’s New Angular 2.0 Isn’t Compatible With Angular 1

An anonymous Slashdot reader quotes TechCrunch:

When Google announced Angular 2 in 2014, it created quite a stir in the web development community because this new version wasn’t just an update, but instead a complete rewrite that wasn’t compatible wit…

An anonymous Slashdot reader quotes TechCrunch:

When Google announced Angular 2 in 2014, it created quite a stir in the web development community because this new version wasn’t just an update, but instead a complete rewrite that wasn’t compatible with the older version… “Angular 1 first solved the problem of how to develop for an emerging web,” the company writes… “Six years later, the challenges faced by today’s application developers, and the sophistication of the devices that applications must support, have both changed immensely.”

Announcing the final release version of Angular 2 last week, Google thanked the open source community, saying “We are grateful to the large number of contributors who dedicated time to submitting pull requests, issues, and repro cases, who discussed and debated design decisions, and validated (and pushed back on) our RCs.” TechCrunch writes that Google’s Angular team “now also recommends that developers use TypeScript to write their apps…a Microsoft-developed superset of JavaScript that adds features like static typing and class-based object-oriented programming.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Alphabet Partners With Chipotle To Deliver Burritos Using Drones

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: Google parent company Alphabet is teaming up with fast casual chain Chipotle to test drone delivery for Virginia Tech students, according to a report from Bloomberg. The pilot program marks a turning …

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: Google parent company Alphabet is teaming up with fast casual chain Chipotle to test drone delivery for Virginia Tech students, according to a report from Bloomberg. The pilot program marks a turning point for Alphabet’s Project Wing division, giving the team ample room to experiment with airborne burrito deliveries in one of the first commercial programs of its kind to be green-lit by the U.S. Federal Aviation Authority. The drones, which will be hybrid aircraft that can both fly and hover in place, will make deliveries coordinated by a Chipotle food truck on campus. Project Wing drones will be guided predominantly by software, but human pilots will be on hand to assume control if necessary. The aircraft are also prohibited from flying directly over human beings. So active participants will be shielded appropriately, according to Alphabet. Project Wing chose to partner with Chipotle because it presented unique challenges: could a drone adequately deliver food using a winch system, and can the food remain hot throughout flight with special packaging? The program will be accessible to select Virginia Tech employees and students.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Alphabet Partners With Chipotle To Deliver Burritos Using Drones

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: Google parent company Alphabet is teaming up with fast casual chain Chipotle to test drone delivery for Virginia Tech students, according to a report from Bloomberg. The pilot program marks a turning …

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: Google parent company Alphabet is teaming up with fast casual chain Chipotle to test drone delivery for Virginia Tech students, according to a report from Bloomberg. The pilot program marks a turning point for Alphabet’s Project Wing division, giving the team ample room to experiment with airborne burrito deliveries in one of the first commercial programs of its kind to be green-lit by the U.S. Federal Aviation Authority. The drones, which will be hybrid aircraft that can both fly and hover in place, will make deliveries coordinated by a Chipotle food truck on campus. Project Wing drones will be guided predominantly by software, but human pilots will be on hand to assume control if necessary. The aircraft are also prohibited from flying directly over human beings. So active participants will be shielded appropriately, according to Alphabet. Project Wing chose to partner with Chipotle because it presented unique challenges: could a drone adequately deliver food using a winch system, and can the food remain hot throughout flight with special packaging? The program will be accessible to select Virginia Tech employees and students.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.