Advertisers Are Still Boycotting YouTube Over Offensive Videos

An anonymous reader quotes the Associated Press:The fallout from the YouTube boycott is likely to be felt through the rest of this year. Skittish advertisers have curtailed their spending until they are convinced Google can prevent their brands from ap…

An anonymous reader quotes the Associated Press:The fallout from the YouTube boycott is likely to be felt through the rest of this year. Skittish advertisers have curtailed their spending until they are convinced Google can prevent their brands from appearing next to extremist clips promoting hate and violence… At one point, about 250 advertisers were boycotting YouTube… The list included big-spending marketers such as PepsiCo, Wal-Mart Stores, Starbucks, AT&T, Verizon, Johnson & Johnson, and Volkswagen. It’s unclear how many, if any, of those have returned to YouTube since Google promised to hire more human reviewers and upgrade its technology to keep ads away from repugnant videos. Both Verizon and AT&T, two companies that are trying to expand their own digital ad networks to compete with Google, told The Associated Press that they are still boycotting YouTube. FX Networks confirmed that it isn’t advertising on YouTube either. Several other boycotting marketers contacted by AP didn’t respond.

Thursday CEO Sundar Pichai told analysts that responding to the boycott, Google held “thousands and thousands” of conversations with advertisers, and one analyst now estimates reduced ad spending on YouTube and Google could cost the company $300 million this year alone.

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Sergey Brin Is Reportedly Building ‘Massive Airship’ In NASA Research Center

Google co-founder Sergey Brin is secretly building a “massive airship” inside of Hangar 2 at the NASA Ames Research Center, according to a report from Bloomberg. “It’s unclear whether the craft, which looks like a zeppelin, is a hobby or something Brin…

Google co-founder Sergey Brin is secretly building a “massive airship” inside of Hangar 2 at the NASA Ames Research Center, according to a report from Bloomberg. “It’s unclear whether the craft, which looks like a zeppelin, is a hobby or something Brin hopes to turn into a business,” reports Bloomberg. When asked about further details, Brin wrote in an email: “Sorry, I don’t have anything to say about this topic right now.” From the report: The people familiar with the project said Brin has long been fascinated by airships. His interest in the crafts started when Brin would visit Ames, which is located next to Google parent Alphabet Inc.’s headquarters in Mountain View, California. In the 1930s, Ames was home to the USS Macon, a huge airship built by the U.S. Navy. About three years ago, Brin decided to build one of his own after ogling old photos of the Macon. In 2015, Google unit Planetary Ventures took over the large hangars at Ames from NASA and turned them into laboratories for the company. Brin’s airship, which isn’t an Alphabet project, is already taking shape inside one. Engineers have constructed a metal skeleton of the craft, and it fills up much of the enormous hangar. Alan Weston, the former director of programs at NASA Ames, is leading Brin’s airship project, according to the people, who asked not to be named discussing the secretive plans. Weston didn’t respond to requests for comment.

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Sergey Brin Is Reportedly Building ‘Massive Airship’ In NASA Research Center

Google co-founder Sergey Brin is secretly building a “massive airship” inside of Hangar 2 at the NASA Ames Research Center, according to a report from Bloomberg. “It’s unclear whether the craft, which looks like a zeppelin, is a hobby or something Brin…

Google co-founder Sergey Brin is secretly building a “massive airship” inside of Hangar 2 at the NASA Ames Research Center, according to a report from Bloomberg. “It’s unclear whether the craft, which looks like a zeppelin, is a hobby or something Brin hopes to turn into a business,” reports Bloomberg. When asked about further details, Brin wrote in an email: “Sorry, I don’t have anything to say about this topic right now.” From the report: The people familiar with the project said Brin has long been fascinated by airships. His interest in the crafts started when Brin would visit Ames, which is located next to Google parent Alphabet Inc.’s headquarters in Mountain View, California. In the 1930s, Ames was home to the USS Macon, a huge airship built by the U.S. Navy. About three years ago, Brin decided to build one of his own after ogling old photos of the Macon. In 2015, Google unit Planetary Ventures took over the large hangars at Ames from NASA and turned them into laboratories for the company. Brin’s airship, which isn’t an Alphabet project, is already taking shape inside one. Engineers have constructed a metal skeleton of the craft, and it fills up much of the enormous hangar. Alan Weston, the former director of programs at NASA Ames, is leading Brin’s airship project, according to the people, who asked not to be named discussing the secretive plans. Weston didn’t respond to requests for comment.

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Google Looks at People As it Pledges To Fight Fake News and ‘Offensive’ Content

Google said today it is taking its first attempt to combat the circulation of “fake news” on its search engine. The company is offering new tools that will allow users to report misleading or offensive content, and it also pledged to improve results ge…

Google said today it is taking its first attempt to combat the circulation of “fake news” on its search engine. The company is offering new tools that will allow users to report misleading or offensive content, and it also pledged to improve results generated by its algorithm. From a report: While the algorithm tweaks should impact on general search results, the reporting tools have been designed for Google’s Autocomplete predictions and Featured Snippets which have been problematic in recent months. Updated algorithms should help to ensure more authoritative pages receive greater prominence, while low-quality content is demoted. Vice president of engineering at Google Search, Ben Gomes, admits that people have been trying to “game” the system — working against the spirit of the purpose of algorithms — to push poor-quality content and fake news higher up search results. He says that the problem now is the “spread of blatantly misleading, low quality, offensive or downright false information.”

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In The First Months of Trump Era, Facebook And Apple Spent More On Lobbying Than They Ever Have

An anonymous reader shares a report: According to federal lobbying disclosures filed Thursday, Facebook and Apple set their all-time record high for spending in a single quarter. Facebook spent $3.2 million lobbying the federal government in the first …

An anonymous reader shares a report: According to federal lobbying disclosures filed Thursday, Facebook and Apple set their all-time record high for spending in a single quarter. Facebook spent $3.2 million lobbying the federal government in the first months of the Trump era. During the same period last year, Facebook spent $2.8 million (about 15% less). The company lobbied both chambers of Congress, the White House, and six federal agencies on issues including high-tech worker visas, network neutrality, internet privacy, encryption, and international taxation. Facebook was the 12th-highest spender out of any company and second-highest in tech. […] Apple spent $1.4 million, which is just $50,000 more than during the final months of the Obama presidency, when it set its previous record, but the most it has ever spent in a single quarter. Apple lobbied on issues including government requests for data, the regulation of mobile health apps, and self-driving cars. Google, once again, outspent every other technology company. It was 10th overall, tallying $3.5 million.

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Google Home Now Recognizes Specific Users’ Voices, Gains Support For Multiple Accounts

Google has issued a long-awaited feature for Google Home: support for multiple users. In an update rolling out today, up to six people will be able to connect their Google account to a Google Home, and the unit will try to distinguish each person’s voi…

Google has issued a long-awaited feature for Google Home: support for multiple users. In an update rolling out today, up to six people will be able to connect their Google account to a Google Home, and the unit will try to distinguish each person’s voice from the other users connected to the device. Therefore, each person will be able to get access to their schedule, playlists, and more. PhoneDog reports: Support for multiple users is rolling out in the U.S. now and will be available in the U.K. in the coming months. To know if the feature is available to you, launch the Google Home app and look for a card that says “Multi-user is available.” You can also click the icon in the upper right corner, find your Google Home, and select “Link your account.” From there, you’ll train the Google Assistant to recognize your voice so that it knows it’s you when you’re talking and not the other people with connected accounts. You’ll say “Ok Google” and “Hey Google” twice each.

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Google Home Now Recognizes Specific Users’ Voices, Gains Support For Multiple Accounts

Google has issued a long-awaited feature for Google Home: support for multiple users. In an update rolling out today, up to six people will be able to connect their Google account to a Google Home, and the unit will try to distinguish each person’s voi…

Google has issued a long-awaited feature for Google Home: support for multiple users. In an update rolling out today, up to six people will be able to connect their Google account to a Google Home, and the unit will try to distinguish each person’s voice from the other users connected to the device. Therefore, each person will be able to get access to their schedule, playlists, and more. PhoneDog reports: Support for multiple users is rolling out in the U.S. now and will be available in the U.K. in the coming months. To know if the feature is available to you, launch the Google Home app and look for a card that says “Multi-user is available.” You can also click the icon in the upper right corner, find your Google Home, and select “Link your account.” From there, you’ll train the Google Assistant to recognize your voice so that it knows it’s you when you’re talking and not the other people with connected accounts. You’ll say “Ok Google” and “Hey Google” twice each.

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Google Earth Gets a New Home On the Web

To celebrate the Earth Day, Google says it is rolling out what was a two-year in the making major update to Google Earth. From a report: The v9 is designed to run in a Web browser (just Chrome for now), but there’s now a standalone home for Google Eart…

To celebrate the Earth Day, Google says it is rolling out what was a two-year in the making major update to Google Earth. From a report: The v9 is designed to run in a Web browser (just Chrome for now), but there’s now a standalone home for Google Earth. The Android app has been updated, too (iOS is coming soon). Version 9 puts a big focus on guided tours via the “Voyager” section, which serves as a jumping off point for YouTube videos, 360-degree content, Street View, and Google Earth landmarks. The tours are led by scientists and documentarians, with some content produced by well-known groups like the BBC’s Planet Earth team. For kids, there’s a Sesame Street muppet section.

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Google’s Featured Snippets Are Damaging To Small Businesses that Depend On Search Traffic

The Outline tells the story of CelebrityNetWorth.com, a website launched in 2008 that tells you how much a celebrity is worth. The site was an instant success, but things have turned sore in the last two years. The creator of the website Brian Warner b…

The Outline tells the story of CelebrityNetWorth.com, a website launched in 2008 that tells you how much a celebrity is worth. The site was an instant success, but things have turned sore in the last two years. The creator of the website Brian Warner blames Google for it. From the article: For most of its history, Google was like a librarian. You asked a question, and it guided you to the section of the web where you might find the answer. But over the past five years, Google has been experimenting with being an oracle. Type in a question, and you might see a box at the top of the search results page with the answer in large bold type. […] In 2014, Warner received an email from Google asking if he would be interested in giving the company access to his data in order to scrape it for Knowledge Graph, for free. He said no, as he feared the traffic would plummet. […] In February 2016, Google started displaying a Featured Snippet for each of the 25,000 celebrities in the CelebrityNetWorth database, Warner said. He knew this because he added a few fake listings for friends who were not celebrities to see if they would pop up as featured answers, and they did. “Our traffic immediately crumbled,” Warner said. He acknowledged the risks in building a site that depends so heavily on Google for search traffic, and whose research can easily be reduced to a single number. But he still thinks what Google did is unfair.

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Chrome 59 To Address Punycode Phishing Attack

Google says it will be rolling out a patch to Chrome in v59 to address a decade-old unicode vulnerability called Punycode that allowed attackers to fool people into clicking on compromised links. Engadget adds: Thanks to something called Punycode, phis…

Google says it will be rolling out a patch to Chrome in v59 to address a decade-old unicode vulnerability called Punycode that allowed attackers to fool people into clicking on compromised links. Engadget adds: Thanks to something called Punycode, phishers are able to register bogus domains that look identical to a real website. Take this proof-of-concept from software engineer Xudong Zheng, where apple.com won’t take you to a store selling Macs, iPhones and iPads. The real website is actually https://www.xn--80ak6aa92e [dot] com. The xn-- prefix tells browsers like Chrome that the domain uses ASCII compatible encoding. It allows companies and individuals from countries with non-traditional alphabets to register a domain that contains A-Z characters but renders in their local language. The issue was first reported to Google and Mozilla on January 20th and Google has issued a fix in Chrome 59. It’s currently live in the Canary (advance beta release) but the search giant will likely make it available to all Chrome users soon.

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