storage

Microsoft Plans $1 Billion Server Farm In Iowa

1sockchuck (826398) writes “Microsoft will invest $1.1 billion to build a massive new server farm in Iowa, not far from an existing data center in West Des Moines. The 1.2 million square foot campus will be one of the biggest in the history of the data center industry. It further enhances Iowa’s status as the data center capital of the Midwest, with Google and Facebook also operating huge server farms in the state.”

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SSD-HDD Price Gap Won’t Go Away Anytime Soon

storagedude (1517243) writes “Flash storage costs have been dropping rapidly for years, but those gains are about to slow, and a number of issues will keep flash from closing the cost gap with HDDs for some time, writes Henry Newman at Enterprise Storage Forum. As SSD density increases, reliability and performance decrease, creating a dilemma for manufacturers who must balance density, cost, reliability and performance. ‘[F]lash technology and SSDs cannot yet replace HDDs as primary storage for enterprise and HPC applications due to continued high prices for capacity, bandwidth and power, as well as issues with reliability that can only be addressed by increasing overall costs. At least for the foreseeable future, the cost of flash compared to hard drive storage is not going to change.’”

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Data Storage Pioneer Wins Millennium Technology Prize

jones_supa (887896) writes “The British scientist Stuart Parkin, whose work made it possible for hard disks to radically expand in size, has been awarded the Millennium Technology Prize (Millennium-teknologiapalkinto). Professor Parkin’s discoveries rely on magneto-resistive thin-film structures and the development of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) spin-valve read head. These advances allow more information to be stored on each disk platter. Technology Academy Finland — the foundation behind the award — justifies the prize by saying that Parkin’s innovations allow us to store large volumes of data in cloud services.” He is currently working on Racetrack memory, which would obsolete flash and hard disks (and probably even RAM).

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Seagate Releases 6TB Hard Drive Sans Helium

Lucas123 (935744) writes “Seagate has released what it said is the industry’s fastest hard drive with up to a 6TB capacity, matching one released by WD last year. WD’s 6TB Ultrastar He6 was hermetically sealed with helium inside, something the company said was critical to reducing friction for additional platters, while also increasing power savings and reliability. Seagate, however, said it doesn’t yet need to rely on Helium to achieve the 50% increase in capacity over its last 4TB drive. The company used the same perpendicular magnetic recording technology that it has on previous models, but it was able to increase areal density from 831 bits per square inch to 1,000. The new drive also comes in 2TB, 4TB and 5TB capacities and with either 12Gbps SAS or 6Gbps SATA connectivity. The six-platter, enterprise-class drive is rated to sustain about 550TB of writes per year — 10X that of a typical desktop drive.”

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OpenSUSE 13.2 To Use Btrfs By Default

An anonymous reader writes “OpenSUSE has shared features coming to their 13.2 release in November. The big feature is using Btrfs by default instead of EXT4. OpenSUSE is committed to Btrfs and, surprisingly, they are the first major Linux distribution to use it by default. But then again, they were also big ReiserFS fans. Other planned OpenSUSE 13.2 features are Wayland 1.4, KDE Frameworks 5, and a new Qt5 front-end to YaST.”

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EU Project Aims To Switch Data Centers To Second Hand Car Batteries

judgecorp writes “An €2.9 million European Commission funded project aims to make data centers more efficient, and one of its ideas is to use second hand car batteries to power data centers. The GreenDataNet consortium includes Nissan, which predicts a glut of still-usable second hand car batteries in around 15 years, when the cars start to wear out. Gathered into large units, these could store enough power to help with the big problem of the electricity grid — the mismatch between local renewable generation cycles and the peaks of demand for power.”

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How Data Storage Has Grown In the Past 60 Years

Lucas123 writes “Imagine that in 1952, an IBM RAMAC 350 disk drive would have been able to hold only one .MP3 song. Today, a 4TB 3.5-in desktop drive (soon to be 5TB) can hold 760,000 songs. As much data as the digital age creates (2.16 Zettabytes and growing), data storage technology has always found a way to keep up. It is the fastest growing semiconductor technology there is. Consider a microSD card that in 2005 could store 128MB of capacity. Last month, SanDisk launched a 128GB microSD card — 1,000 times the storage in under a decade. While planar NAND flash is running up against a capacity wall, technology such as 3D NAND and Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) hold the promise of quadrupling of solid state capacity. Here are some photos of what was and what is in data storage.”

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How Do You Backup 20TB of Data?

Sean0michael writes “Recently I had a friend lose their entire electronic collection of music and movies by erasing a RAID array on their home server. He had 20TB of data on his rack at home that had survived a dozen hard drive failures over the years. But he didn’t have a good way to backup that much data, so he never took one. Now he wishes he had. Asking around among our tech-savvy friends though, no one has a good answer to the question, ‘how would you backup 20TB of data?’. It’s not like you could just plug in an external drive, and using any cloud service would be terribly expensive. Blu-Ray discs can hold a lot of data, but that’s a lot of time (and money) spent burning discs that you likely will never need. Tape drives are another possibility, but are they right for this kind of problem? I don’ t know. There might be something else out there, but I still have no feasible solution. So I ask fellow slashdotters: for a home user, how do you backup 20TB of Data?” Even Amazon Glacier is pretty pricey for that much data.

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Can Commercial Storage Services Handle the NSA’s Metadata?

itwbennett writes “In a review of NSA surveillance last month, President Obama called for a new approach on telephony metadata that will ‘establish a mechanism that preserves the capabilities we need without the government holding this bulk metadata.’ Obama said that a third party holding all the data in a single, consolidated database would be essentially doing what is a government function, and may not increase public confidence that its privacy is being protected. Now, an RFI (request for information) has been posted to get information on U.S. industry’s commercially available capabilities, so that the government can investigate alternative approaches.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Can Commercial Storage Services Handle the NSA’s Metadata?

itwbennett writes “In a review of NSA surveillance last month, President Obama called for a new approach on telephony metadata that will ‘establish a mechanism that preserves the capabilities we need without the government holding this bulk metadata.’ Obama said that a third party holding all the data in a single, consolidated database would be essentially doing what is a government function, and may not increase public confidence that its privacy is being protected. Now, an RFI (request for information) has been posted to get information on U.S. industry’s commercially available capabilities, so that the government can investigate alternative approaches.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.