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This Is What’s Left Behind When a Supernova Explodes

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A violent star explosion long ago has left behind an eye-catching supernova remnant, an ethereal grave marker in space that has been seen like never before by scientists using three space telescopes.

When supersized stars reach the end of their lives, they explode in a brilliant burst of light that can outshine entire galaxies and give off more energy than a smaller star can produce in its entire lifetime. The giant destructive supernova explosions leave behind beautiful wisps of dust and gas called supernova remnants. NASA captured an image of one of these star ghosts by combining infrared light from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, as well as X-ray light from space agency’s Chandra X-Ray Observatory and the European XMM-Newton telescope. Read more…

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Brown Dwarf With Water Clouds Tentatively Detected Just 7 Light-Years From Earth

sciencehabit (1205606) writes Astronomers have found signs of water ice clouds on an object just 7.3 light-years from Earth — less than twice the distance of Alpha Centauri. If confirmed, the discovery is the first sighting of water clouds beyond our solar system. The clouds shroud a Jupiter-sized object known as a brown dwarf and should yield insight into the nature of cool giant planets orbiting other suns.

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Exomoon Detection Technique Could Greatly Expand Potential Habitable Systems

Luminary Crush (109477) writes Most of the detected exoplanets thus far have been gas giants which aren’t great candidates for life as we know it. However, many of those planets are in fact in the star’s habitable zone and could have moons with conditions more favorable. Until now, methods to detect the moons of such gas giants have been elusive, but researchers at the University of Texas, Arlington have discovered a way to detect the interaction of a moon’s ionosphere with the parent gas giant from studies of Jupiter’s moon Io. The search for ‘Pandora’ has begun.

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Slashdot Asks: Cheap But Reasonable Telescopes for Kids?

I am interested in a telescope for the use of some elementary and middle school aged relatives. Older and younger siblings, and parents, would no doubt get some scope time, too. Telescopes certainly come in a range of prices, from cheap to out of this world, and I am purely a duffer myself. But I enjoy looking at the moon and stars with magnification, and think they would, too. What I’m trying to find might be phrased like this: “the lowest priced scope that’s reasonably robust, reasonably accurate, and reasonably usable for kids” — meaning absolute precision is less important than a focus that is easy to set and doesn’t drift. Simplicity in design beats tiny, ill-labeled parts or an incomprehensible manual, even if the complicated one might be slightly better when perfectly tuned. I’d be pleased if some of these kids decide to take up astronomy as a hobby, but don’t have any strong expectation that will happen — besides, if they really get into it, the research for a better one would be another fun project. That said, while I’m price sensitive, I’m not looking *only* at the price tag so much as seeking insight about the cluster of perceived sweet spots when it come to price / performance / personality. By “personality” I mean whether it’s friendly, well documented, whether it comes intelligently packaged, whether it’s a crapshoot as to whether a scope with the same model name will arrive in good shape, etc — looking at online reviews, it seems many low-end scopes have a huge variance in reviews. What scopes would you would consider giving to an intelligent 3rd or 4th grader? As a starting point, Google has helped me find some interesting guides that list some scopes that sound reasonable, including a few under or near $100. (Here’s one such set of suggestions.) What would you advise buying, from that list or otherwise? (There are some ideas that sound pretty good in this similar question from 2000, but I figure the state of the art has moved on.) I’m more interested in avoiding awful junk than I am expecting treasure: getting reasonable views of the moon is a good start, and getting at least some blurry rings around Saturn would be nice, too. Simply because they are so cheap, I’d like to know if anyone has impressions (worth it? pure junk?) of the Celestron FirstScope models, which are awfully tempting for under $50.

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Spot ET’s Waste Heat For Chance To Find Alien Life

mdsolar passes along this selection from New Scientist describing a (comparatively) low-tech means of scanning the skies for extraterrestrial civilizations: The best-known technique used to search for tech-savvy aliens is eavesdropping on their communications with each other. But this approach assumes ET is chatty in channels we can hear. The new approach, dubbed G-HAT for Glimpsing Heat from Alien Technologies, makes no assumptions about what alien civilisations may be like. “This approach is very different,” says Franck Marchis at the SETI Institute in California, who was not involved in the project. “I like it because it doesn’t put any constraints on the origin of the civilisation or their willingness to communicate.” Instead, it utilises the laws of thermodynamics. All machines and living things give off heat, and that heat is visible as infrared radiation. The G-HAT team combed through the catalogue of images generated by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, which released an infrared map of the entire sky in 2012. A galaxy should emit about 10 per cent of its light in the mid-infrared range, says team leader Jason Wright at Pennsylvania State University. If it gives off much more, it could be being warmed by vast networks of alien technology – though it could also be a sign of more prosaic processes, such as rapid star formation or an actively feeding black hole at the galaxy’s centre.

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2 Galileo Satellites Launched To Wrong Orbit

As reported by the BBC, two satellites meant to form part of the EU’s Galileo global positioning network have been launched into a wrong, lower orbit, and it is unclear whether they can be salvaged. NASASpaceFlight.com has a more detailed account of the launch, which says [D]espite the Arianespace webcast noting no issue with the launch, it was later admitted the satellites were lofted into the wrong orbit. “Following the announcement made by Arianespace on the anomalies of the orbit injection of the Galileo satellites, the teams of industries and agencies involved in the early operations of the satellites are investigating the potential implications on the mission,” noted a short statement, many hours after the event. It is unlikely the satellites can be eased into their correct orbit, even with a large extension to their transit time. However, ESA are not classing the satellites as lost at this time. “Both satellites have been acquired and are safely controlled and operated from ESOC, ESA’s Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany,” the Agency added. Over the course of the next “year or so,” an additional 24 satellites are slated to complete the Galileo constellation, to be launched by a mixed slate of Ariane and Soyuz rockets.

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The Star That Exploded At the Dawn of Time

sciencehabit writes To probe the dawn of time, astronomers usually peer far away; but now they’ve made a notable discovery close to home. An ancient star a mere thousand light-years from Earth bears chemical elements that may have been forged by the death of a star that was both extremely massive and one of the first to arise after the big bang. If confirmed, the finding means that some of the universe’s first stars were so massive they died in exceptionally violent explosions that altered the growth of early galaxies.

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NASA’s Space Launch System Searches For a Mission

schwit1 writes: Managers of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) are searching for a mission that they can propose and convince Congress to fund. “Once SLS is into the 2020s, the launch rate should see the rocket launching at least once per year, ramping up to a projected three times per year for the eventual Mars missions. However, the latter won’t be until the 2030s. With no missions manifested past the EM-2 flight, the undesirable question of just how ‘slow’ a launch rate would be viable for SLS and her workforce has now been asked.” Meanwhile, two more Russian rocket engines were delivered yesterday, the first time that’s happened since a Russian official threatened to cut off the supply. Another shipment of three engines is expected later this year. In Europe, Arianespace and the European Space Agency signed a contract today for the Ariane 5 rocket to launch 12 more of Europe’s Galileo GPS satellites on three launches. This situation really reminds me of the U.S. launch market in the 1990s, when Boeing and Lockheed Martin decided that, rather than compete with Russia and ESA for the launch market, they instead decided to rely entirely on U.S. government contracts, since those contracts didn’t really demand that they reduce their costs significantly to compete.

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Curiosity Rover Stalled by Slippery Martian Sand

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NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity may have to choose a new route to the base of a huge Red Planet mountain.

The 1-ton Curiosity rover had been heading for Mount Sharp — a 3.4-mile-high mountain in the center of Mars’ Gale Crater — via “Hidden Valley,” a sandy swale that’s about the length of a football field. But Curiosity turned back shortly after entering the valley’s northeastern end earlier this month, finding the sand surprisingly slippery, NASA officials said.

“We need to gain a better understanding of the interaction between the wheels and Martian sand ripples, and Hidden Valley is not a good location for experimenting,” Curiosity project manager Jim Erickson, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, said in a statement Read more…

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Elon Musk’s SpaceX Is Raising Money At A Valuation Approaching $10B

asiasat_8_streak_3 Space Exploration Technologies, the commercial space transportation startup founded by Elon Musk with ambitions to land people on Mars, is raising investment that values the company somewhere south of $10 billion, TechCrunch has learned. Read More