privacy

‘Anonymized’ Credit Card Data Not So Anonymous, MIT Study Shows

schwit1 writes Scientists showed they can identify you with more than 90 percent accuracy by looking at just four purchases, three if the price is included — and this is after companies “anonymized” the transaction records, saying they wiped away names and other personal details. The study out of MIT, published Thursday in the journal Science, examined three months of credit card records for 1.1 million people. “We are showing that the privacy we are told that we have isn’t real,” study co-author Alex “Sandy” Pentland of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said in an email.

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Snowden Documents: CSE Tracks Millions of Downloads Daily

Advocatus Diaboli writes Canada’s electronic spy agency sifts through millions of videos and documents downloaded online every day by people around the world, as part of a sweeping bid to find extremist plots and suspects, CBC News has learned. Details of the Communications Security Establishment project dubbed ‘Levitation’ are revealed in a document obtained by U.S. whistleblower Edward Snowden and recently released to CBC News. Under Levitation, analysts with the electronic eavesdropping service can access information on about 10 to 15 million uploads and downloads of files from free websites each day, the document says.

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Hey, User! Do You Know What Your Apps Are Up To?

privacy It’s International Data Privacy Day, not that most people would likely know that — or, some would argue, care. And therein lies the rub. Privacy, we are constantly told by those with their hands on the levers of power, is not something users are bothered about. Read More

DEA Cameras Tracking Hundreds of Millions of Car Journeys Across the US

itwbennett writes: A U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration program set up in 2008 to keep tabs on cars close to the U.S.-Mexican border has been gradually expanded nationwide and is regularly used by other law enforcement agencies in their hunt for suspects. The extent of the system, which is said to contain hundreds of millions of records on motorists and their journeys, was disclosed in documents obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union as part of a Freedom of Information Act request.

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Mass Surveillance Threatens Digital Security And Human Rights, Says European Report

edward-snowden-nova-1024x575 A 32-page report into mass surveillance by a top European rights body has warned that digital dragnets set up by U.S. government intelligence agencies, and some of the U.S.’ allies in Europe and elsewhere, are endangering fundamental human rights — such as the right to privacy, to freedom of information and expression, to freedom of religion and the right to a fair trial. Read More

Omand Warns of "Ethically Worse" Spying If Unbreakable Encryption Is Allowed

Press2ToContinue writes In their attempts to kill off strong encryption once and for all, top officials of the intelligence services are coming out with increasingly hyperbolic statements about why this should be done. Now, a former head of GCHQ, Sir David Omand has said: “One of the results of Snowden is that companies are now heavily encrypting [communications] end to end. Intelligence agencies are not going to give up trying to get the bad guys. They will have to get closer to the bad guys. I predict we will see more close access work.” According to The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, which reported his words from a talk he gave earlier this week, by this he meant things like physical observation, bugging rooms, and breaking into phones or computers. “You can say that will be more targeted but in terms of intrusion into personal privacy — collateral intrusion into privacy — we are likely to end up in an ethically worse position than we were before.” That’s remarkable for its implied threat: if you don’t let us ban or backdoor strong encryption, we’re going to start breaking into your homes.

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China Cuts Off Some VPNs

jaa101 writes The Register (UK) and the Global Times (China) report that foreign VPN services are unavailable in China. A quote sourced to “one of the founders of an overseas website which monitors the Internet in China” claimed ‘The Great Firewall is blocking the VPN on the protocol level. It means that the firewall does not need to identify each VPN provider and block its IP addresses. Rather, it can spot VPN traffic during transit and block it.’ An upgrade of the Great Firewall of China is blamed and China appears to be backing the need for the move to maintain cyberspace sovereignty.

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China reportedly attacks Microsoft users in apparent surveillance attempt

China-and-outlook

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China mounted a cyberattack on users of Microsoft’s Outlook email service on Saturday, with the apparent goal of spying on their communications, according to a Chinese Internet monitoring group.

On January 17, people within China using email clients to connect to their Outlook, Hotmail or Live accounts were subjected to a “man-in-the-middle” (MITM) attack in which the attacker tried to hijack what’s normally a secure, encrypted connection, according to a report by GreatFire

The activist group believes this is the latest attempt by China to intercept and spy on communications that it can’t easily monitor Read more…

More about Microsoft, China, Privacy, Outlook, and Surveillance

Police Nation-Wide Use Wall-Penetrating Radars To Peer Into Homes

mi writes At least 50 U.S. law enforcement agencies have secretly equipped their officers with radar devices that allow them to effectively peer through the walls of houses to see whether anyone is inside. The device the Marshals Service and others are using, known as the Range-R, looks like a sophisticated stud-finder. Its display shows whether it has detected movement on the other side of a wall and, if so, how far away it is — but it does not show a picture of what’s happening inside. The Range-R’s maker, L-3 Communications, estimates it has sold about 200 devices to 50 law enforcement agencies at a cost of about $6,000 each. Other radar devices have far more advanced capabilities, including three-dimensional displays of where people are located inside a building, according to marketing materials from their manufacturers. One is capable of being mounted on a drone. And the Justice Department has funded research to develop systems that can map the interiors of buildings and locate the people within them.

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Being Pestered By Drones? Buy a Drone-Hunting Drone

schwit1 writes, “Are paparazzi flying drones over your garden to snap you sunbathing? You may need the Rapere, the drone-hunting drone which uses ‘tangle-lines’ to quickly down its prey.” From The Telegraph’s article: It has been designed to be faster and more agile than other drones to ensure that they can’t escape – partly by limiting flight time and therefore reducing weight. “Having worked in the UAS industry for years, we’ve collectively never come across any bogus use of drones. However it’s inevitable that will happen, and for people such as celebrities, where there is profit to be made in illegally invading their privacy, there should be an option to thwart it,” the group say on their website. This seems more efficient than going after those pesky paparazzi drones with fighting kites (video), but it should also inspire some skepticism: CNET notes that the team behind it is anonymous, and that “Rapere works in a lab setting, however there aren’t any photos or videos of the killer drone in action. The website instead has only a slideshow of the concept.”

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