privacy

Help a Journalist With An NFC Chip Implant Violate His Own Privacy and Security

An anonymous reader writes: His wife thinks he’s crazy, but this guy got an NFC chip implanted in his arm, where it will stay for at least a year. He’s inviting everyone to come up with uses for it. Especially ones that violate his privacy and security. There must be something better to do than getting into the office or unlocking your work PC. He says, “The chip we are using is the xNTi, an NFC type 2 NTAG216, which is about the size of a grain of rice and is manufactured by the Dutch semiconductor company NXP, maker of the NFC chip for the new iPhone. It is a glass transponder with an operating frequency of 13.56MHz, developed for mass-market applications such as retail, gaming and consumer electronics. … The chip’s storage capacity is pretty limited, the UID (unique identifier) is 7 bytes, while the read/write memory is 888 bytes. It can be secured with a 32-bit password and can be overwritten about 100,000 times, by which point the memory will be quite worn. Data transmission takes place at a baud rate of 106 kbit/s and the chip is readable up to 10 centimeters, though it is possible to boost that distance.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Help a Journalist With An NFC Chip Implant Violate His Own Privacy and Security

An anonymous reader writes: His wife thinks he’s crazy, but this guy got an NFC chip implanted in his arm, where it will stay for at least a year. He’s inviting everyone to come up with uses for it. Especially ones that violate his privacy and security. There must be something better to do than getting into the office or unlocking your work PC. He says, “The chip we are using is the xNTi, an NFC type 2 NTAG216, which is about the size of a grain of rice and is manufactured by the Dutch semiconductor company NXP, maker of the NFC chip for the new iPhone. It is a glass transponder with an operating frequency of 13.56MHz, developed for mass-market applications such as retail, gaming and consumer electronics. … The chip’s storage capacity is pretty limited, the UID (unique identifier) is 7 bytes, while the read/write memory is 888 bytes. It can be secured with a 32-bit password and can be overwritten about 100,000 times, by which point the memory will be quite worn. Data transmission takes place at a baud rate of 106 kbit/s and the chip is readable up to 10 centimeters, though it is possible to boost that distance.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








US Post Office Increases Secret Tracking of Mail

HughPickens.com writes: Ron Nixon reports in the NY Times that the United States Postal Service says it approved nearly 50,000 requests last year from law enforcement agencies and its own internal inspection unit to secretly monitor the mail of Americans for use in criminal and national security investigations, in many cases without adequately describing the reason or having proper written authorization. In addition to raising privacy concerns, the audit questioned the efficiency and accuracy of the Postal Service in handling the requests. The surveillance program, officially called mail covers, is more than a century old, but is still considered a powerful investigative tool. The Postal Service said that from 2001 through 2012, local, state and federal law enforcement agencies made more than 100,000 requests to monitor the mail of Americans. That would amount to an average of some 8,000 requests a year — far fewer than the nearly 50,000 requests in 2013 that the Postal Service reported in the audit (PDF). In Arizona in 2011, Mary Rose Wilcox, a Maricopa County supervisor, discovered that her mail was being monitored by the county’s sheriff, Joe Arpaio. Wilcox had been a frequent critic of Arpaio, objecting to what she considered the targeting of Hispanics in his immigration sweeps. Wilcox sued the county, was awarded nearly $1 million in a settlement in 2011 and received the money this June when the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the ruling. Andrew Thomas, the former county attorney, was disbarred for his role in investigations into the business dealings of Ms. Wilcox and other officials and for other unprofessional conduct. “I don’t blame the Postal Service,” says Wilcox, “but you shouldn’t be able to just use these mail covers to go on a fishing expedition. There needs to be more control.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








US Post Office Increases Secret Tracking of Mail

HughPickens.com writes: Ron Nixon reports in the NY Times that the United States Postal Service says it approved nearly 50,000 requests last year from law enforcement agencies and its own internal inspection unit to secretly monitor the mail of Americans for use in criminal and national security investigations, in many cases without adequately describing the reason or having proper written authorization. In addition to raising privacy concerns, the audit questioned the efficiency and accuracy of the Postal Service in handling the requests. The surveillance program, officially called mail covers, is more than a century old, but is still considered a powerful investigative tool. The Postal Service said that from 2001 through 2012, local, state and federal law enforcement agencies made more than 100,000 requests to monitor the mail of Americans. That would amount to an average of some 8,000 requests a year — far fewer than the nearly 50,000 requests in 2013 that the Postal Service reported in the audit (PDF). In Arizona in 2011, Mary Rose Wilcox, a Maricopa County supervisor, discovered that her mail was being monitored by the county’s sheriff, Joe Arpaio. Wilcox had been a frequent critic of Arpaio, objecting to what she considered the targeting of Hispanics in his immigration sweeps. Wilcox sued the county, was awarded nearly $1 million in a settlement in 2011 and received the money this June when the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the ruling. Andrew Thomas, the former county attorney, was disbarred for his role in investigations into the business dealings of Ms. Wilcox and other officials and for other unprofessional conduct. “I don’t blame the Postal Service,” says Wilcox, “but you shouldn’t be able to just use these mail covers to go on a fishing expedition. There needs to be more control.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








US Post Office Increases Secret Tracking of Mail

HughPickens.com writes: Ron Nixon reports in the NY Times that the United States Postal Service says it approved nearly 50,000 requests last year from law enforcement agencies and its own internal inspection unit to secretly monitor the mail of Americans for use in criminal and national security investigations, in many cases without adequately describing the reason or having proper written authorization. In addition to raising privacy concerns, the audit questioned the efficiency and accuracy of the Postal Service in handling the requests. The surveillance program, officially called mail covers, is more than a century old, but is still considered a powerful investigative tool. The Postal Service said that from 2001 through 2012, local, state and federal law enforcement agencies made more than 100,000 requests to monitor the mail of Americans. That would amount to an average of some 8,000 requests a year — far fewer than the nearly 50,000 requests in 2013 that the Postal Service reported in the audit (PDF). In Arizona in 2011, Mary Rose Wilcox, a Maricopa County supervisor, discovered that her mail was being monitored by the county’s sheriff, Joe Arpaio. Wilcox had been a frequent critic of Arpaio, objecting to what she considered the targeting of Hispanics in his immigration sweeps. Wilcox sued the county, was awarded nearly $1 million in a settlement in 2011 and received the money this June when the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the ruling. Andrew Thomas, the former county attorney, was disbarred for his role in investigations into the business dealings of Ms. Wilcox and other officials and for other unprofessional conduct. “I don’t blame the Postal Service,” says Wilcox, “but you shouldn’t be able to just use these mail covers to go on a fishing expedition. There needs to be more control.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Hackers Are Exploiting Microsoft PowerPoint to Hijack Computers

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Hackers are exploiting a security flaw in Microsoft Office by using PowerPoint to attack Windows users and gain control of computer systems.

Microsoft, in a security advisory on its website, says there have been “limited, targeted attacks” against users through Microsoft PowerPoint. An attacker who successfully exploits the security flaw could gain complete control of the system. With that sort of control, hackers could execute code remotely, alter or delete data and install harmful programs, like malware

The hack affects all supported releases of Microsoft Windows (with the exception of Windows Server 2003), and it’s executed when a computer opens a specially crafted Microsoft Office file that contains a malicious version of what’s called an OLE (or object linking and embedding) object. An OLE object, in this sense, is data that’s embedded in a different file, like an Excel spreadsheet in a Word document, for example. Read more…

More about Microsoft, Security, Privacy, Online Security, and Windows


Hackers Are Exploiting Microsoft PowerPoint to Hijack Computers

Powerpoint_lock

Feed-twFeed-fb

Hackers are exploiting a security flaw in Microsoft Office by using PowerPoint to attack Windows users and gain control of computer systems.

Microsoft, in a security advisory on its website, says there have been “limited, targeted attacks” against users through Microsoft PowerPoint. An attacker who successfully exploits the security flaw could gain complete control of the system. With that sort of control, hackers could execute code remotely, alter or delete data and install harmful programs, like malware

The hack affects all supported releases of Microsoft Windows (with the exception of Windows Server 2003), and it’s executed when a computer opens a specially crafted Microsoft Office file that contains a malicious version of what’s called an OLE (or object linking and embedding) object. An OLE object, in this sense, is data that’s embedded in a different file, like an Excel spreadsheet in a Word document, for example. Read more…

More about Microsoft, Security, Privacy, Online Security, and Windows

Assange: Google Is Not What It Seems

oxide7 (1013325) writes “In June 2011, Julian Assange received an unusual visitor: the chairman of Google, Eric Schmidt. They outlined radically opposing perspectives: for Assange, the liberating power of the Internet is based on its freedom and statelessness. For Schmidt, emancipation is at one with U.S. foreign policy objectives and is driven by connecting non-Western countries to Western companies and markets. These differences embodied a tug-of-war over the Internet’s future that has only gathered force subsequently. Assange describes his encounter with Schmidt and how he came to conclude that it was far from an innocent exchange of views.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Austin Airport Tracks Cell Phones To Measure Security Line Wait

jfruh writes If you get into the TSA security line at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, you’ll see monitors telling you how long your wait will be — and if you have a phone with Wi-Fi enabled, you’re helping the airport come up with that number. A system implemented by Cisco tracks the MAC addresses of phones searching for Wi-Fi networks and sees how long it takes those phones to traverse the line, giving a sense of how quickly things are moving. While this is useful information to have, the privacy implications are a bit unsettling.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Camera-Covered Jacket Is the Ultimate in Sartorial Surveillance

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City streets in London and New York are increasingly tracking crime through the use of public surveillance cameras. But what happens if you’re attacked or robbed in an area that doesn’t have any cameras?

That’s the question a pair of South Korea-based artists attempted to answer when they created the Aposematic Jacket, a blazer festooned with cameras connected to the web

Conceived by Shin Seung Back and Kim Yong Hun, and stitched together by former Giorgio Armani designer Jehee Sheen, the jacket houses nearly 50 cameras pointing in all directions, and conceals a battery pack that powers the system Read more…

More about Fashion, Art, Privacy, Wearables, and South Korea