timothy

Intuit, Maker of Turbotax, Lobbies Against Simplified Tax Filings

McGruber (1417641) writes “Return-free filing might allow tens of millions of Americans to file their taxes for free and in minutes. Under proposals authored by several federal lawmakers, it would be voluntary, using information the government already receives from banks and employers and that taxpayers could adjust. The concept has been endorsed by Presidents Obama and Reagan and is already a reality in some parts of Europe. Sounds great, except to Intuit, maker of Turbotax: last year, Intuit spent more than $2.6 million on lobbying, some of it to lobby on four bills related to the issue, federal lobbying records show.”

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OpenBSD Team Cleaning Up OpenSSL

First time accepted submitter Iarwain Ben-adar (2393286) writes “The OpenBSD has started a cleanup of their in-tree OpenSSL library. Improvements include removing “exploit mitigation countermeasures”, fixing bugs, removal of questionable entropy additions, and many more. If you support the effort of these guys who are responsible for the venerable OpenSSH library, consider a donation to the OpenBSD Foundation. Maybe someday we’ll see a ‘portable’ version of this new OpenSSL fork. Or not.”

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Netflix Gets What It Pays For: Comcast Streaming Speeds Skyrocket

jfruh (300774) writes “Back in February, after a lengthy dispute, Netflix agreed to pay Comcast for network access after being dogged by complaints of slow speeds from Comcast subscribers. Two months later, it appears that Comcast has delivered on its promises, jumping up six places in Netflix’s ISP speed rankings. The question of whether this is good news for anyone but Comcast is still open.”

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Slashdot Asks: How Do You Pay Your Taxes?

April 15, 2014 isn’t just a full moon: it’s Tax Day in the U.S. That means most American adults have already submitted a tax return, or an extension request, to the IRS and — except for a few lucky states — to their state governments as well. I filed my (very simple) tax return online. After scanning the free options, since I live in a state — Texas — that does not collect personal income tax, I chose Tax Act’s free services. That meant enduring a series of annoying upgrade plugs throughout the process, but I could live with that; I have no reason to think it was better or worse than TurboTax or any of the other e-Filing companies, but I liked Tax Act’s interface, and it seemed less skeevy in all those upgrade plugs than the others I glanced at. The actual process took an hour and 19 minutes once I sat down with the papers I needed. My financial life is pretty simple, though: I didn’t buy or sell a house, didn’t buy or sell stocks outside of a retirement account mutual fund, and didn’t move from one state to another. How do you do your taxes? Do you have an argument for one or another of the online services, or any cautionary tales? Do you prefer to send in forms on paper? Do you hire an accountant? (And for readers outside the U.S., it’s always interesting to hear how taxes work in other countries, too. Are there elements of the U.S. system you’d prefer, or that you’re glad you don’t need to deal with?)

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How Amazon Keeps Cutting AWS Prices: Cheapskate Culture

An anonymous reader writes “Amazon Web Services has cut its prices on 40-plus consecutive occasions, at times leading the charge, at other times countering similar moves by Microsoft and Google. This article at CRN includes some interesting behind-the-scenes trivia about how Amazon keeps costs down, including some interesting speculation — for example, that perhaps the reason Amazon’s Glacier storage is so cheap is that maybe it might be based at least partly on tape, not disk (Amazon would not comment). The article also explains that the company will only pay for its employees to fly Economy, and that includes its senior executives. If they feel the need to upgrade to Business or First Class, they must do so from their own pocket. And instead of buying hardware from an OEM vendor, AWS sources its own components – everything from processors to disk drives to memory and network cards — and uses contract manufacturing to put together its machines.”

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Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

judgecorp (778838) writes “Three weeks after Russia asserted that Crimea is part of its territory, the social networks have a problem: how to categories their users from the region? Facebook and the largest Russian social network, Vkontakte, still say Crimeans are located in Ukraine, while other Russian social networks say they are Russians. Meanwhile, on Wikipedia, an edit war has resulted in Crimea being part of Russia, but shaded a different colour to signify the territory is disputed. Search engine Yandex is trying to cover both angles: its maps service gives a different answer, depending on which location you send your query from.”

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Humans Are Taking Jobs From Robots In Japan

Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes “Bloomberg reports that humans are taking the place of machines in plants across Japan so workers can develop new skills and figure out ways to improve production lines and the car-building process. “We need to become more solid and get back to basics, to sharpen our manual skills and further develop them,” says Mitsuru Kawai, a half century-long company veteran tapped by President Akio Toyoda to promote craftsmanship at Toyota’s plants. “When I was a novice, experienced masters used to be called gods (Kami-sama in Japanese), and they could make anything.” According to Kawai, learning how to make car parts from scratch gives younger workers insights they otherwise wouldn’t get from picking parts from bins and conveyor belts, or pressing buttons on machines. At about 100 manual-intensive workspaces introduced over the last three years across Toyota’s factories in Japan, these lessons can then be applied to reprogram machines to cut down on waste and improve processes. In an area Kawai directly supervises at the forging division of Toyota’s Honsha plant, workers twist, turn and hammer metal into crankshafts instead of using the typically automated process. Experiences there have led to innovations in reducing levels of scrap and shortening the production line and Kawai also credits manual labor for helping workers improve production of axle beams and cut the costs of making chassis parts. “We cannot simply depend on the machines that only repeat the same task over and over again,” says Kawai. “To be the master of the machine, you have to have the knowledge and the skills to teach the machine.”"

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Commenters To Dropbox CEO: Houston, We Have a Problem

theodp (442580) writes “On Friday, Dropbox CEO Drew Houston sought to quell the uproar over the appointment of former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to the company’s board of directors, promising in a blog post that Rice’s appointment won’t change its stance on privacy. More interesting than Houston’s brief blog post on the method-behind-its-Condi-madness (which Dave Winer perhaps better explained a day earlier) is the firestorm in the ever-growing hundreds of comments that follow. So will Dropbox be swayed by the anti-Condi crowd (“If you do not eliminate Rice from your board you lose my business”) or stand its ground, heartened by pro-Condi comments (“Good on ya, DB. You have my continued business and even greater admiration”)? One imagines that Bush White House experience has left Condi pretty thick-skinned, and IPO riches are presumably on the horizon, but is falling on her “resignation sword” — a la Brendan Eich — out of the question for Condi?”

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Bill Would End US Govt’s Sale of Already-Available Technical Papers To Itself

An anonymous reader writes “Members of the Senate have proposed a bill that would prohibit the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) from selling to other U.S. federal agencies technical papers that are already freely available. NTIS is under the Department of Commerce. The bill is probably a result of a 2012 report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) which points out that ‘Of the reports added to NTIS’s repository during fiscal years 1990 through 2011, GAO estimates that approximately 74 percent were readily available from other public sources.’ Ars Technica notes that the term ‘public sources’ refers to ‘either the issuing organization’s website, the federal Internet portal, or another online resource.’”

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AT Black Knight Transformer Hits the Road and Takes a Hop

Zothecula (1870348) writes “Following on from driving tests that wound up in December last year, the Black Knight Transformer prototype demonstrator has taken to the air for the first time. California-based Advanced Tactics, Inc., announced its vehicle, which combines the capabilities of a helicopter and an off-road vehicle, completed its first flight tests last month, being remotely piloted at an undisclosed location in Southern California.”

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