timothy

Building a Honeypot To Observe Shellshock Attacks In the Real World

Nerval’s Lobster writes A look at some of the Shellshock-related reports from the past week makes it seem as if attackers are flooding networks with cyberattacks targeting the vulnerability in Bash that was disclosed last week. While the attackers haven’t wholesale adopted the flaw, there have been quite a few attacks—but the reality is that attackers are treating the flaw as just one of many methods available in their tool kits. One way to get a front-row seat of what the attacks look like is to set up a honeypot. Luckily, threat intelligence firm ThreatStream released ShockPot, a version of its honeypot software with a specific flag, “is_shellshock,” that captures attempts to trigger the Bash vulnerability. Setting up ShockPot on a Linux server from cloud host Linode.com is a snap. Since attackers are systematically scanning all available addresses in the IPv4 space, it’s just a matter of time before someone finds a particular ShockPot machine. And that was definitely the case, as a honeypot set up by a Dice (yes, yes, we know) tech writer captured a total of seven Shellshock attack attempts out of 123 total attacks. On one hand, that’s a lot for a machine no one knows anything about; on the other, it indicates that attackers haven’t wholesale dumped other methods in favor of going after this particular bug. PHP was the most common attack method observed on this honeypot, with various attempts to trigger vulnerabilities in popular PHP applications and to execute malicious PHP scripts.

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Xen Cloud Fix Shows the Right Way To Patch Open-Source Flaws

darthcamaro writes Amazon, Rackspace and IBM have all patched their public clouds over the last several days due to a vulnerability in the Xen hypervisor. According to a new report, the Xen project was first advised of the issue two weeks ago, but instead of the knee jerk type reactions we’ve seen with Heartbleed and now Shellshock, the Xen project privately fixed the bug and waited until all the major Xen deployments were patched before any details were released. Isn’t this the way that all open-source projects should fix security issues? And if it’s not, what is?

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After Dallas Ebola Diagnosis, CDC Raises Estimate of Patient’s Possible Contacts

As reported by Bloomberg News, The Washington Post, and other outlets, the Liberian patient whose diagnosis of Ebola infection marks him as the first such case to have been first diagnosed within the United States may have had contact with more people than previously estimated, and 80 people in the Dallas area are now believed to have come into contact with him. While Bloomberg reports that this larger group of potential contacts is “being monitored for symptoms,” the Washington Post’s slightly later story says that, in keeping with the best current knowledge about Ebola’s spread, “Dallas County Health and Human Services Director Zachary Thompson said that these [newly identified contacts] are not being watched or monitored and are not showing any symptoms of the illness. Only the immediate family members of the victim are being regularly monitored for Ebola symptoms; they’ve been ordered to stay at home and avoid contact with others.”

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UK Copyright Reforms Legalize Back-Ups, Protect Parody

rastos1 writes A law has come into effect that permits UK citizens to make copies of CDs, MP3s, DVDs, Blu-rays and e-books. Consumers are allowed to keep the duplicates on local storage or in the cloud. While it is legal to make back-ups for personal use, it remains an offence to share the data with friends or family. Users are not allowed to make recordings of streamed music or video from Spotify and Netflix, even if they subscribe to the services. Thirteen years after iTunes launched, it is now legal to use it to rip CDs in the UK. Just as interesting are the ways that the new UK law explicitly, if imperfectly, protects parody.

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How Hackers Accidentally Sold a Pre-Release XBox One To the FBI

SpacemanukBEJY.53u (3309653) writes Earlier this week, an indictment was unsealed outlining a long list of charges against a group of men that stole intellectual property from gaming companies such as Epic Games, Valve, Activision and Microsoft. An Australian member of the group, Dylan Wheeler, describes how it was betrayed by an informant working for the FBI, which bought a hardware mockup of an Xbox One that the group built using source code stolen from Microsoft’s Game Developer Network Portal. The device, which the FBI paid $5,000 for, was supposed to be sent to the Seychelles, but never arrived, which indicated the hacking collective had a mole.

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New OS X Backdoor Malware Roping Macs Into Botnet

An anonymous reader writes New malware targeting Mac machines, opening backdoors on them and roping them into a botnet currently numbering around 17,000 zombies has been spotted. The malware, dubbed Mac.BackDoor.iWorm, targets computers running OS X and makes extensive use of encryption in its routines, Dr. Web researchers noted. What’s even more interesting is that it gets the IP address of a valid command and control (C&C) server from a post on popular news site Reddit. The malware is capable of discovering what other software is installed on the machine, opening a port on it, and sending a query to a web server to acquire the addresses of the C&C servers.

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HP Introduces Sub-$100 Windows Tablet

jfruh writes While Windows-based tablets haven’t exactly set the world on fire, Microsoft hasn’t given up on them, and its hardware partners haven’t either. HP has announced a series of Windows tablets, with the 7-inch low-end model, the Stream 7, priced at $99. The Stream brand is also being used for low-priced laptops intended to compete with Chromebooks (which HP also sells). All are running Intel chips and full Windows, not Windows RT.

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HP Introduces Sub-$100 Windows Tablet

jfruh writes While Windows-based tablets haven’t exactly set the world on fire, Microsoft hasn’t given up on them, and its hardware partners haven’t either. HP has announced a series of Windows tablets, with the 7-inch low-end model, the Stream 7, priced at $99. The Stream brand is also being used for low-priced laptops intended to compete with Chromebooks (which HP also sells). All are running Intel chips and full Windows, not Windows RT.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Matchstick and Mozilla Take On Google’s Chromecast With $25 Firefox OS Dongle

An anonymous reader writes Matchstick and Mozilla today announced their open-source take on the Chromecast: a $25 Firefox OS-powered HDMI dongle. The streaming Internet and media stick will be available first through Kickstarter, in the hopes to drive down the price tag. Jack Chang, Matchstick General Manager in the US, described the device to me as “essentially an open Chromecast.” He explained that while the MSRP is $25 (Google’s Chromecast retails for $35), the Kickstarter campaign is offering a regular price of $18, and an early bird price of $12.

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Interview With Facebook’s Head of Open Source

Czech37 writes Facebook may be the world’s most well-known tech companies, but it’s not renowned for being at the forefront of open source. In reality, they have over 200 open source projects on GitHub and they’ve recently partnered with Google, Dropbox, and Twitter (amongst others) to create the TODO group, an organization committed to furthering the open source cause. In an interview with Opensource.com, Facebook’s James Pearce talks about the progress the company has made in rebooting their open source approach and what’s on the horizon for the social media network.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.