Stephanie Buck

If you don’t believe the rape victim, chances are you’re wrong

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People lie. We lie about liking our in-laws. We lie about our income. We lie to our parents about studying at the library when really we’re smoking weed in the park.

These lies are common. A victim lying about rape is not

Yet Rolling Stone decided Friday to distance itself from its widely read story about a violent sexual assault on the University of Virginia campus. The story, written by Sabrina Rubin Erdely, followed a survivor named Jackie. It documented the subsequent campus investigation into the fraternity brothers who allegedly raped Jackie in 2012.

Problem is, Rolling Stone never actually talked with those accused men. Read more…

More about Media, Crime, Features, Women, and Rolling Stone


38% of Americans have never even heard of Uber

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Of those people who have heard of Uber, 88% have never used it. Really puts our theories about Uber’s downfall into perspective, doesn’t it?

On Nov. 17 BuzzFeed reported that Uber SVP Emil Michael suggested spending $1 million to hire a team to dig up dirt on journalists who spoke against the company. This followed reports of competitor sabotage, sexism and privacy violations by Uber

It’s no surprise that threatening journalists and tracking users erupted in a media frenzy — many reporters penned op-eds threatening to delete the app and suggesting other users do the same. Some business analysts even speculated whether this series of mistakes would lead to a measurable business hit, or at least, investor cold feet. Read more…

More about Travel, Apps, Startups, Features, and Business

6 foods exempt from the FDA’s strict new calorie count rules

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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced stricter calorie count regulations on Tuesday that will require a wider set of American businesses to post calorie information alongside most menu offerings, specifically prepared foods

These regulations not only adhere to businesses larger than 20 chains, but also vending machines, movie theaters, convenience stores and more. They have rolling deadlines, but most will take effect one year from now

FDA commissioner Margaret Hamburg said the new regulations are one additional step toward fighting the United States’ obesity epidemic Read more…

More about Health, Law, Features, Business, and Obesity

Dear Barbie, get it together. Love, female developers everywhere

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Barbie is a smart woman. We know this because Mattel has repeatedly reminded us of her accomplishments (see: all of Barbie’s careers, which span from sign language instructor to world peace ambassador).

Why, then, does she suddenly require the help of two men before she can become a computer engineer?

So says the 2013 children’s book Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer, published by Random House. Reviewed by novelist Pamela Ribbon on Monday, the book follows a flustered Barbie who requires “Steven and Brian” to create a video game (after all, she’s “only the designer,” so they have to finish it up for her) Read more…

More about Books, Features, Tech, Women, and Dev

What we wore to Woodstock

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From Aug. 15-18, 1969, Woodstock — or more formally, the Woodstock Music & Art Fair — took place on a dairy farm in the Catskills region of New York. Promoted as “An Aquarian Exposition: 3 Days of Peace & Music,” the organizers expected around 200,000 to attend. All told, the audience numbered somewhere between 400,000 and 500,000

That crowd battled rain, mud, lack of food and inadequate lavatories, but it did not lose its sense of style. Here are some of the fashions you would have seen on — and off — the backs of the festival-goers. Read more…

More about Fashion, Music, Entertainment, Features, and History


What we wore to Woodstock

Woodstock-full-161

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From Aug. 15-18, 1969, Woodstock — or more formally, the Woodstock Music & Art Fair — took place on a dairy farm in the Catskills region of New York. Promoted as “An Aquarian Exposition: 3 Days of Peace & Music,” the organizers expected around 200,000 to attend. All told, the audience numbered somewhere between 400,000 and 500,000

That crowd battled rain, mud, lack of food and inadequate lavatories, but it did not lose its sense of style. Here are some of the fashions you would have seen on — and off — the backs of the festival-goers. Read more…

More about Fashion, Music, Entertainment, Features, and History


What we wore to Woodstock

Woodstock-full-161

Feed-twFeed-fb

From Aug. 15 to 18, 1969, Woodstock — or more formally, the Woodstock Music and Art Fair — took place on a dairy farm in the Catskills region of New York. Promoted as “An Aquarian Exposition: 3 Days of Peace and Music,” the organizers expected around 200,000 people to attend. All told, the audience numbered somewhere between 400,000 and 500,000

That crowd battled rain, mud, lack of food and inadequate lavatories, but it did not lose its sense of style. Here are some of the fashions you would have seen on — and off — the backs of festival-goers. Read more…

More about Fashion, Music, Entertainment, Features, and History


What do men think of catcalling? A men’s rights activist and a feminist debate

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By now, you’re aware of the Hollaback video that went viral in late October: A hidden camera followed a woman as she experienced more than 100 catcalls, within 10 hours of walking in New York City

What you may not have noticed were the comment sections of this video and the social forums where it was being shared. Some of the most frequent commenters were men who decried this treatment on the one hand, and defended it on the other

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Image: YouTube

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Image: YouTube

If one of the goals of the video was to get men talking, well, it worked

In an effort to synthesize the major pillars of the discussion, we asked two men to tackle some of the video’s biggest strengths and flaws, as well as the definition of “harassment” in general. Introducing Paul Elam, founder of A Voice for Men, a men’s rights news site, and Amani Herron, founder of the Truth From The Basement blog and an advocate against domestic violence. Read more…

More about Features, Women, Debate, Gender, and Feminism


It’s National Adoption Month: 20 surreal photos of foster kids at play

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November is National Adoption Month in the U.S., and photographer Rob Woodcox is helping foster kids act out their dreams in real life. A former foster kid himself, Woodcox volunteers at the Royal Family Kids Camp for children of similar backgrounds. Through his photography, he celebrates their imaginations and facilitates wonder so they can build greater confidence.

“I felt [it] would help them imagine other dreams, rather than forcing them relive their fears, and would be more powerful in helping them overcome their situations,” he tells Mashable.

More about Kids, Photography, Features, Family, and Adoption


Inside the first augmented reality-powered beauty book

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It’s like a coffee table book-slash-video experience

Fashion and beauty photographer Kenneth Willardt compiled some of his most celebrated photographs of celebrities and models into a thick tome called The Beauty Book. Released Nov. 7, the book comes with an AR app of the same name. Point your phone at specially labeled pages in the book, and the photographs animate with sound and video

Willardt’s vivid, suggestive and sometimes haunting photos have moved fans for years, but this is the first time he’s incorporated consumer technology

More about Entertainment, Apps, Celebrities, Art, and Photography